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London Underground ghost stations

London Underground ghost stations

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Old Jun 7, 11, 2:18 pm
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Originally Posted by Mizter T View Post
A web page of some vintage will enlighten you regarding the Charing Cross/Strand/Embankment conundrum.
I had picked up a bit from Wikipedia earlier, but now I must curse you for that link and all of its linked goodness My evening is probably now shot learning about all the idiosyncrasies of my daily commute. (Why the northbound Northern Line platform at Embankment has such a wicked curve, the legacy "Mind the Gap" announcement there, etc., etc., etc.)
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Old Jun 7, 11, 2:34 pm
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I've linked this in the past, a must for anyone interested in the tube

http://districtdave.proboards.com/index.cgi
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Old Jun 8, 11, 4:52 am
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Probably bunkers down there somewhere.
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Old Jun 8, 11, 5:13 am
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Originally Posted by mtkeller View Post
I just happened to notice a very old LU map outside of Temple yesterday on my way home (after months of commuting to/from that station) and then saw this thread. Looked today, and it's labelled as a 1932 LU map. It shows the old Aldwych station and has the present Charing Cross labelled as Strand. Wanted to get home without too much of a delay tonight, so didn't spend too much time checking it out. Will have to give it a closer look one of these days.
I'm sure you could buy one from the London Transport Museum store.
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Old Jun 8, 11, 5:20 am
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There's quite a few here.
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Old Jun 8, 11, 5:49 am
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Originally Posted by stut View Post
There's quite a few here.
Interestingly, the one at Temple isn't on that site. It's a geographical version, but definitely different to the ones posted.
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Old Jun 8, 11, 9:11 am
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Originally Posted by stut View Post
There's quite a few here.
I had no idea that the Metropolitan Line used to go past Amersham to Aylesbury.

http://www.clarksbury.com/cdl/maps/tube51.gif

Good Lord, that must have taken about a year to get into London.
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Old Jun 8, 11, 9:24 am
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The District Line ran from Ealing Broadway to Windsor Central in the 40s, too.
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Old Jun 8, 11, 9:28 am
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Originally Posted by stut View Post
The District Line ran from Ealing Broadway to Windsor Central in the 40s, too.
....and to Southend in the 20's.

The Met used to offer a pullman car service before the second world war too. All the way from Verney Junction which is a very long way from London!
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Old Jun 8, 11, 10:16 am
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I was reading Sherlock Holmes recently, and was amused/surprised about how he used trains to get around (even if not quite the underground - i think he might have used it once!).

This thread also reminded me about a tv programme (I'd hesitate to call it a documentary) about ghosts on the underground - you've all been reading about disused stations, I've been scaring myself with ghost stories :O
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Old Jun 8, 11, 1:39 pm
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Originally Posted by Swanhunter View Post
... Verney Junction ...
Ah yes, Verney Junction, mentioned in John Betjeman's wonderful TV film 'Metro-land' in 1973. However, according to Wikpedia:
... Verney Junction, near to the Claydons, the most distant outpost of the Metropolitan, closed since 1936, which, by the 1970s, had largely been reclaimed by nature. Betjeman appeared to close the programme here with the words, "Grass triumphs. And I must say I’m rather glad", although the scene was in fact filmed at Shipton Lee, some five miles to the south of the former terminus.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metro-land_%28TV%29

IIRC, Betjeman said that there had been plans for trains from Verney Junction direct to the Continent. Gosh!

Anybody remember the film Death Line (aka Raw Meat):
There's something pretty grisly going on under London in the Tube tunnels between Holborn and Russell Square. When a top civil servant becomes the latest to disappear down there Scotland Yard start to take the matter seriously.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068458/

It's a long time since I saw the film, and I somehow thought that it was supposed to take place between Holborn and British Museum stations. Survivors of an underground disaster trapped in the tunnels had become cannibals, especially when there were just the one or two passengers waiting for the last train. (Those were the days ...) In my formative years, I noted that the monsters spoke the only words they got to hear - 'Mind the doors' - as they prowled.

'Stand clear of the closing doors' doesn't have the same impact.

Last edited by Roger; Jun 9, 11 at 1:39 am Reason: cannibals, not carnivorous
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Old Jun 8, 11, 2:48 pm
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including"ghsahhhhhhh, what a lovely way to while away a layover at a shiny but dull monochromatic airport......looking at colorful tube maps of yesteryear!

An elder techie colleague reminds me that back-when computers/storage devices had to be installed in long rows, the devices would get names of tube stations in the order of one of the longer London Underground lines...... which reminds me of a Brit Lit professor whose college required monthly computer password changes so she had a tube map in her desk drawer and just ticked off the next station name on the Picadilly Line.....including "ghost stations" would just be so brilliant!

Last edited by peersteve; Jun 8, 11 at 3:18 pm Reason: just more babbling
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Old Jun 9, 11, 3:35 pm
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I used to use Aldwych station when I worked near the RCJ, usually at the end of the day when too lazy to walk to Holborn

Last year the station opened to the public for a week, with lots of How We're Improving Your Tube information, but most people seemed more interested in the actual station itself. Visitors weren't allowed down to the platforms (shame, that) but it was very satisfying to one's inner anorak to revisit an old haunt.

And to add to stut's list of videos made at Aldwych a favourite from this year's Meltdown director.
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Old Jun 10, 11, 5:51 pm
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Originally Posted by xenole View Post
Probably bunkers down there somewhere.
Well the most famous is the Defence Crisis Management Centre (Which is under the MOD - oops) and you can see some of it here

http://www.wired.com/rawfile/2011/01...unker/?pid=625

There is a Russian site with a translation of the original Daily mail article from 2008 but I'm not sure how safe that site is so I'm not posting a link but it's easily found via Google.

Also have a look through the air vent grills at the QE2 Centre which are at street level. Through one of these grills you can see some stairs and an 'interesting' notice on the wall.

Last edited by Jimmie76; Jun 10, 11 at 6:01 pm
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Old Jun 13, 11, 11:42 am
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There are a number of now-abandoned stations on all the main systems London, Paris, New York, etc. They are over 100 years old now and have had many changes over time so this is inevitable.

A map showing everything, current and abandoned, of London, Paris, and many other European cities is here, both on-screen and downloadable pdf, from a French website :

http://carto.metro.free.fr/metro-tram-london/

There was a fascinating book I bought about 30 years ago, now up in the attic with all the aviation books, something like "Subterranean Secret London", self published by the author and very detailed for its time, but the author was paranoid about every abandoned platform, mysterious passage at a station, wartime tunnels, etc, being part of a grand conspiracy theory about MI5's activities in London. The technical research was spot on, but the ludicrous conclusions were a real hoot.

Originally Posted by Jenbel
I was reading Sherlock Holmes recently, and was amused/surprised about how he used trains to get around (even if not quite the underground - I think he might have used it once!).
Conan Doyle was well known as a great train buff (maybe Stut's predecessor ?) and wrote other stories entirely about trains, eg "The Lost Special". His stories are well known for always having slight variances from reality, for example he often left from the "wrong" London station for where he was going to, but this was just his well-informed deliberate little joke. He knew his stuff.

http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-st...s/LosSpe.shtml

He incorporated so much of Victorian railways in his stories that there have been whole articles in train buff magazines picking them all out. And in "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans", a key Holmes story, the Metropolitan Line is right in the centre of the story. The Underground as such did not exist as an organisation when he was writing.

Last edited by WHBM; Jun 13, 11 at 11:47 am
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