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Global Entry Kiosks Declarations and Food Questions

Global Entry Kiosks Declarations and Food Questions

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Old Sep 14, 19, 4:37 am   -   Wikipost
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Global Entry kiosks typically ask a yes/no question about whether you are bringing "food" into the country. The question is broader than on the deprecated blue form that asked about fruits, vegetables, meats, etc.

CBP answers the question of whether you must declare all "food" on its website:

Must I declare food items or products when using the Global entry kiosk?

Yes, all food items and products must be declared when entering the U.S.

You may be able to bring in food such as fruits, meats or other agricultural products depending on the region or country from which you are traveling.
General consensus is that the best practice is to declare any "food", include candies, cookies, snacks, etc. and then inform the CBP agent about your food. Experience has been that in nearly all cases the agent will wave you through with extremely minimal delay. As explained elsewhere, the primary focus of the question is to prevent importation of fruits, vegetable, and meats that could cause harm to the American food supply, but it is safest to allow the CBP agent to make the determination.

There is some debate as to whether items one can ingest for non-nutritive reasons (e.g., gum, toothpaste, medicine) should qualify as food. There does not appear to be an answer from CBP or experience showing the proper categorization of such items.
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Old Jun 13, 19, 4:46 pm
  #961  
 
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Arrived at LAX today from Japan. Selected yes to the food question, got the circle and “report to baggage control” as usual.

I was stopped after collecting my bags but before approaching the customs lanes by a CBP officer for a “random” questioning, as I sometimes see happen to other passengers.

He asked what was in the bag on the top of my cart, and I said “mostly food, but only snacks like candies and cookies.”

He looked at my GE printout slip and said “it’s good that you said yes to food, because even if you don’t declare something small like candy you could lose your global entry.

I know this, so I just smiled and said “yes, that’s why I always say yes to that question.”

I’ve read that many people have encountered officers who are annoyed for declaring such small things - things that aren’t prohibited at all like candy - but I’ve never encountered one myself. Today is the first time, however, that I’ve encountered someone so explicit about it though. Usually I just get a “thank you for declaring” or “welcome home.”
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Old Jun 13, 19, 4:57 pm
  #962  
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Originally Posted by sethb View Post
Machine didn't ask any questions, or even want to see my passport, yesterday. Just took a photo of my face and gave me a slip. The agent asked questions.
That is Global Entry 2.0, which integrates facial recognition technology into the Global Entry kiosks.

For indexing and future search purposes, please continue this discussion in the relevant thread:
Global Entry 2.0 - Facial Recognition Pilot
Thank you,

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Old Jun 16, 19, 3:00 pm
  #963  
 
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The food answers have been very informative. What is the GE process now if you declare to have jewelry/clothes/wine over the $800 exemption? And can you combine exemption limits with: a live-in girlfriend, relatives that you don't live with, a long-time girlfriend who works and lives in a different city?

Also, would it be wise to have researched the tariff guide and tell the officer what you think you owe or wait for them to figure it out (at the risk of them figuring it higher than you—the categories are very confusing).
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Old Jun 16, 19, 3:23 pm
  #964  
 
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You can combine limits with the people you are travelling with. That said, minors cannot be used concerning alcohol and tobacco product limits.
https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det...cbp-form-6059b
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Old Jun 16, 19, 3:36 pm
  #965  
 
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Originally Posted by EQDsSUCK View Post
The food answers have been very informative. What is the GE process now if you declare to have jewelry/clothes/wine over the $800 exemption? And can you combine exemption limits with: a live-in girlfriend, relatives that you don't live with, a long-time girlfriend who works and lives in a different city?

Also, would it be wise to have researched the tariff guide and tell the officer what you think you owe or wait for them to figure it out (at the risk of them figuring it higher than you—the categories are very confusing).
There's a separate question that asks if you're over your duty free exemption. Note that the $800/1L alcohol isn't fixed and depends on how long you've gone and where you've traveled to and such.

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det...cbp-form-6059b

So for family allowances: Possibly. No. Possibly not.

I wouldn't bother. A) supposedly they're experienced enough, trained enough, and have the tools to make accurate duty assessments, B) the attitude of too many CBP agents is to escalate a situation if encountering any pushback or challenge. Unless the assessment is extremely off, better to either just eat or file an appeal later imo. My personal experience is most agents will waive duty when exceeding the exemption limits, seemingly rather than go through the hassle of doing so. If you're bring in clearly more than personal use or excessively high value items, I think that would have a different outcome.
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Old Jun 16, 19, 9:02 pm
  #966  
 
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Originally Posted by rustykettel View Post
So for family allowances: Possibly. No. Possibly not.

I wouldn't bother. A) supposedly they're experienced enough, trained enough, and have the tools to make accurate duty assessments, B) the attitude of too many CBP agents is to escalate a situation if encountering any pushback or challenge. Unless the assessment is extremely off, better to either just eat or file an appeal later imo. My personal experience is most agents will waive duty when exceeding the exemption limits, seemingly rather than go through the hassle of doing so. If you're bring in clearly more than personal use or excessively high value items, I think that would have a different outcome.
SO, if you declare that you have jewelry or a watch or whatever that exceeds to exemption limit by thousands, the CBP officer might just waive you through?

Regarding non-spouses sharing allowances, its a little confusing. In the first part it sets three conditions. Then it provides a definition of "domestic relationship" but it is unclear to what this is referring since that term isn't used in the three conditions.

FROM CBP:

In accordance with 19 CFR 148.34(b) member of a family residing in one household includes all persons who meet the following three conditions:

1. Are related by blood, marriage, or adoption;

2. Lived together in one household at their last permanent residence; and

3. Intend to live together in one household after their arrival in the United States.

"Domestic relationship" would be defined to include:
- foster children, stepchildren, half-siblings, legal wards, other dependents, and individuals with an in loco parentis or guardianship relationship;
- two adults who are in a committed relationship including, but not limited to, long-term companions and couples in civil unions or domestic partnerships where the partners are financially interdependent, and are not married to, or a partner of, anyone else.
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Old Jun 18, 19, 7:17 pm
  #967  
 
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Originally Posted by EQDsSUCK View Post
And can you combine exemption limits with: a live-in girlfriend, relatives that you don't live with, a long-time girlfriend who works and lives in a different city?
just a note that currency reporting limit ($10k) cannot be combined...

https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det...-into-or-leave

However, if a person or persons traveling together and filing a joint declaration (CBP Form 6059-B) have more than $10,000 in currency or negotiable monetary instruments, they must fill out a "Report of International Transportation of Currency and Monetary Instruments" FinCEN 105 (former CF 4790).
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Old Jun 18, 19, 11:29 pm
  #968  
 
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Originally Posted by EQDsSUCK View Post
SO, if you declare that you have jewelry or a watch or whatever that exceeds to exemption limit by thousands, the CBP officer might just waive you through?

Regarding non-spouses sharing allowances, its a little confusing. In the first part it sets three conditions. Then it provides a definition of "domestic relationship" but it is unclear to what this is referring since that term isn't used in the three conditions.
It's apparently up to the CBP agent's discretion or non-publicized agency policy. I don't know where they draw the line. I do know that I've brought back items over the limit (~3-4L alcohol or several hundred over the $800 pp exemption) and was just waived after declaring.

CBP deleted domestic relationships from the first clause. The linked CFR has it as

1) Are related by blood, marriage, domestic relationship, or adoption;
which makes more sense than the CBP website version.
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Old Aug 31, 19, 8:08 pm
  #969  
 
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Interesting tangential note: Just in Mexico, and the customs card has a "food" box phrased basically like the US one -- fresh fruits, agricultural items, food, etc. I typically have checked "no", but thought, hey, I have food (nuts, candy) and a half case of wine (food to me), so checked yes. After inspection (which would have happened anyway due to the wine), I mentioned how I checked yes due to "food" and she said "oh, no, that's just for fresh vegetables, meat, etc." Go figure.
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Old Aug 31, 19, 10:04 pm
  #970  
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Folks,

It is time for the periodical reminder that the Trusted Travelers forum is informational. Members come here to share experiences and offer practical advice about applying for and using the various Trusted Travelers programs so that they can travel with minimum hassle and maximum benefits.

Please limit your responses here to facts, experiences, data points and practical suggestions.

Opinions, rants and commentary belong in the Checkpoints and Borders Policy Debate forum.

Posts have been deleted.

Thank your for understanding,

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Old Sep 14, 19, 11:07 am
  #971  
 
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Global Entry - Question about entering the US with food

I have Global Entry. I will be returning to the US in a few days and I have a lot of foods. These include things like snacks, chips, fruit jelly, cup noodles, and dried fruit. I don't have any fresh produce or meat products. Do I need to declare all of these when entering the US? If yes, how would I do that? I have never declared anything before (only got GE this year) and I don't know the English equivalent for a lot of these products.
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Old Sep 14, 19, 12:38 pm
  #972  
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Welcome to FlyerTalk @tuxtuxtux1!

I merged your question into the relevant thread.

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Old Sep 14, 19, 2:17 pm
  #973  
 
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Originally Posted by tuxtuxtux1 View Post
I have Global Entry. I will be returning to the US in a few days and I have a lot of foods. These include things like snacks, chips, fruit jelly, cup noodles, and dried fruit. I don't have any fresh produce or meat products. Do I need to declare all of these when entering the US? If yes, how would I do that? I have never declared anything before (only got GE this year) and I don't know the English equivalent for a lot of these products.
Just select yes to the food question if it's the old style kiosk and hand the receipt to the officer for the declaration. You'll get an O on the receipt which indicates there's a customs declaration. The new style Global Entry 2.0 will match your photo with your facial features and print a receipt without prompting declarations on the screen, but the officer will ask about declarations when you hand in the receipt. Just respond with what you have.

You may be waved through or sent to agricultural inspection where they'll x-ray your bags if they need a closer look. I imagine some of the items you've listed like fruit jelly, cup noodles (which can contain meat bases or flavor packets), and dried fruit might default you to the ag inspection to determine admissibility of the items. Even with an x-ray or manual inspection of food and beverage items, it's never taken me more than a minute or two.
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Old Sep 14, 19, 2:24 pm
  #974  
 
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Originally Posted by tuxtuxtux1 View Post
I have Global Entry. I will be returning to the US in a few days and I have a lot of foods. These include things like snacks, chips, fruit jelly, cup noodles, and dried fruit. I don't have any fresh produce or meat products. Do I need to declare all of these when entering the US? If yes, how would I do that? I have never declared anything before (only got GE this year) and I don't know the English equivalent for a lot of these products.
I always write a list of the food I have, broken into two columns: Food I am re-importing and food that I acquired overseas. I hand the slip to CPB. I find that making this list in advance, before jet lag sets in, gives me peace of mind that I haven’t forgotten anything.
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Old Sep 14, 19, 4:40 pm
  #975  
 
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Originally Posted by tuxtuxtux1 View Post
I don't know the English equivalent for a lot of these products.
I would use a dictionary or google for the English name. If you don't know the name of the product in any language, or if CBP doesn't recognize the English name, you can reply "it's a type of {fruit, vegetable, sweet snack, salty snack}."
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