Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Community > Trip Reports
Reload this Page > A Honeymoon to Remember: Hong Kong, Thailand, and Japan in Style

A Honeymoon to Remember: Hong Kong, Thailand, and Japan in Style

Reply

Old Jan 11, 18, 6:05 pm
  #61  
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Tokyo
Programs: SPG LT Plat ANA Plat
Posts: 596
Living in Japan I can only say dont judge Tsukiji if you have never been, like anywhere feel free to have an opinion. I personally think it is a unique experience and soon if they ever move, not to be repeated
at least in the same environment. I have helped many many people go and they loved it, of course you can find great sushi all over Tokyo and at more social hours, but its the experience that is important.

I encourage visitors in the next few months to go, it will be your last chance.
BRITINJAPAN3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 18, 6:37 pm
  #62  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 105
@Annalisa12 - Thank you so much! The Siam was incredible! I know it gets a lot of flak here due to its location, but I personally think it's exceptional.
@BRITINJAPAN3 - Thanks for the feedback. Again, it's my opinion, but it is in my capacity as a Japanophile and frequent visitor to Japan. The fact that I have never been to Tsukiji shouldn't have any bearing on my opinion that it's not worth the effort to visit. I've never been to the JELL-O Museum in New York, but I wouldn't recommend going either. I'm curious what exactly people have loved at the market? If it's the food, there is better elsewhere. Is it seeing dead fish? Go to Sea World (Blackfish joke). Is it seeing an auction? Ebay can sate your itch. I think if you are living in Tokyo and have seen all there is to do, then sure maybe go to the market. But, if you're a tourist, there are much better things to do with your limited time. My point, although it was sarcastic, is that I believe the only reason people go to the market is because at some point it became an IT thing to do. People go only because they are told to go. And, if that's the sole basis for people going, I just find it pointless. It would be as if I started a trend for foreigners visiting NYC to get up early and visit the Gowanus Canal and watch EPA workers cleaning it. Again, if your a tourist who for whatever reason desire to see the market, by all means go. You are correct that it is permanently moving, so this will be your last chance (although again this furthers my point that this is a thing to do solely because it's an IT thing to do). But, if you are on the fence and contemplating a 5 am tour through a fish factory, maybe think twice.
Anlun is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 11, 18, 11:07 pm
  #63  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: New York
Programs: AA EXP, Marriott Gold, SPG & HH Gold
Posts: 646
This is how I felt after seeing the Robot show in Tokyo. I now lose a little respect for anyone who tells me how much they loved going there.

I did however enjoy the fish market, but that is because I liked seeing all the fish/seafood on display and the orderly chaos involved. FWIW, I think the better comparison for NYC would be something like Ellis Island - Unique to the city, a pain logistically and people will either love its history or be bored out of their mind.

Also, congrats on the wedding / honeymoon and great trip report!

Last edited by uclabruin82; Jan 12, 18 at 9:41 am Reason: to add an additional thought
uclabruin82 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 12, 18, 7:25 pm
  #64  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 105
Originally Posted by uclabruin82 View Post
This is how I felt after seeing the Robot show in Tokyo. I now lose a little respect for anyone who tells me how much they loved going there.

I did however enjoy the fish market, but that is because I liked seeing all the fish/seafood on display and the orderly chaos involved. FWIW, I think the better comparison for NYC would be something like Ellis Island - Unique to the city, a pain logistically and people will either love its history or be bored out of their mind.

Also, congrats on the wedding / honeymoon and great trip report!
Hah, I debated using the Robot show as my initial point, but the sushi theme fit better so I used the market. Both I feel have a similar critique. Good point on Ellis Island. I was trying to think of an analogy involving people in NYC doing a typical days work while being gawked by tourists. Thanks for the well wishes. Next update should be coming soon. It will mostly detail our time staying at the Asaba ryokan.
Anlun is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 13, 18, 5:29 pm
  #65  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Racine, WI/VCE
Programs: AA EXP, MR and SPG LT Plat, Arise Mucci des Hommes de Fer
Posts: 1,043
Originally Posted by Anlun View Post
Previously on A Honeymoon to Remember, this daring duo braved the elements, Bangkok traffic, and risked their very lives to savor the wondrous culinary creations at Gaggan. So was it worth it, you may ask? The answer is…. sort of. We arrived at the restaurant breathless, but within the time limit given. I only had a moment to sneak a quick pic of the restaurant’s façade before rushing in, but it really stands out from its surroundings. Gaggan is located in a narrow alleyway across from a hotel, but you could not tell from the picture. The façade evokes an old world colonial style, but with a modern edge. The old world white with the glass and metal creates a powerful first impression, and makes you look forward to what awaits. It actually reminded me of our hotel, The Siam.




Inside, we were seated in a nice alcove, and we were introduced to Vlad, who I think was the sommelier. Vlad was incredibly knowledgeable and friendly, making conversation about how a Russian ended up working in Bangkok, how he loved New York, and, of course the wine. We wanted a wine that was both light but would assert itself with each of the many different courses. We let me him know that we are big fans of Alsace whites. He recommended a great option, which we will probably be buying the near future.

I would characterize Gaggan’s menu as the ....... love child of Willy Wonka and Eric Ripert. The dishes are inventive and unique, and when they work, they really work. However, Gaggan also toes the line between quirky and kitschy. I believe that if you are going to make the eater participate in some unique way with your course, it should add something to the meal, and not simply be something that is done simply for the sake of having it done. This is my first critique of Gaggan. Some of the dishes were presented as an ‘event’ and involved eating it in a cheesy way that detracted from the actual course itself. My second critique is precisely what we feared. Gaggan’s menu is no longer an homage to his Indian roots. It can now be best characterized as Indian-Japanese fusion. Perhaps others won’t be bothered by this change, and I appreciate that he is incorporating new techniques taken from Japanese cuisine into his cooking, but that really isn’t what we were looking for here.

Gaggan’s menu consists of 25 small distinctive courses, but the menu itself is not a menu in the traditional sense. Instead, you are given a translucent sheet filled with 25 emojis, each of which represent the course. Gaggan invites the diner to try and guess what each course is before revealing it to you. See what I mean about toe the line? Yet, in this respect we enjoyed the guessing and it made the overall experience fun, and the meal interactive.





The first course had a watermelon emoji, but the plate consisted of what at first glance, appears to be an oyster with a pearl. In fact, the dish was a bright and refreshing watermelon flavored gelatin. It was a great starter and made for a powerful first impression.




Course two had an explosion emoji, and we characterized it as yogurt explosion. On first impression, the dish looks like a soft-boiled egg, and the texture was similar, but it was made of yogurt. The dish tasted like a mix between egg yolk and a lassi. It was delicious.




Course three is where the kitsch goes too far. The emoji consists of a tongue, and it was quite literal because we were presented with a plate of black truffle puree designed in the shape of a tongue, and the words “Lick it up” made from a pea puree. The presentation of the dish was accompanied by a small speaker with Kiss’s Lick It Up playing. Needless to say, you are meant to eat this dish by licking up the plate. The course itself was delicious, and we did not get any of the normal overt richness that normally accompanies black truffle dishes. The pea puree was herbaceous and complimented the earthiness of the truffle well. But the licking ruined it for me. It was too cute, and like I said, it added nothing to the course.

Course four had a shrimp emoji and was a play on the traditional tom yum goong. This dish was killer, and the presentation was very cool. It was a one bite, dehydrated shrimp head that ate like a potato chip, wrapped by what I can best describe as a coconut fruit roll up. There were strong notes of lemongrass and the coconut was very forward, complimenting the shrimp flavor well. For a one biter, all the flavors of tom yum goong were prevalent.



Course five had a flower emoji and was nicknamed “flower power.” The reveal stated “goat brain” but we tasted curry with hints of avocado. The texture was crunchy and similar to a rice cake.




Course six and seven were served together and had an eggplant and chili emoji. The eggplant course was an eggplant tart, made with eggplant and garnished with powdered burnt eggplant. The eggplant was prevalent, but there was a strong sweetness that I think fought with the seventh course, the chili. The chili course was a white chocolate bonbon with a chili pepper liquid inside. It was more sweet than spicy, and had this been served on its own at the end of the meal, it would have been great. But there was simply too much sweetness going on here.



Course eight had a rice emoji, and consisted of a rice sponge cake with an Indian curry foam. This was very innovative and delicious, tasting almost identical to a yellow curry with rice.



Course nine had a banana emoji and consisted of a torched banana cake with a foie gras mousse. The sweetness of the banana played well with foie gras,



Course ten had a fish emoji and was a play on granola bars. The dish consisted of granola and sea bass, and tasted of milk and fish, but it was surprisingly well balanced and enjoyable.



Course eleven had a martini glass emoji and was a play on a gin and tonic. It consisted of horseradish ice cream with a gin and tonic foam and a dill cone with uni. Here, the chef could have used a little restraint as I felt there was a too much going on. The flavors paired well, but it the uni slightly overpowered the other more subtle notes.




Course twelve had a sushi emoji and consisted of medium fatty tuna with a dashi meringue and wasabi. This is evidence of my point about the Japanese fusion. This was a tasty dish, but I just don’t think it went well with the theme of the courses. It just sticks out in an obvious way, giving the impression that the chef just wanted to throw in some Japanese.




Course thirteen had carrot emoji and consisted of a carrot “waffle” with a foie gras cream filling. The waffle was sweet and crispy and paired well with the savoriness of the foie gras.



Course fourteen had a green tea emoji and was the chef’s take on a traditional Japanese matcha green tea serving. This was interesting in that the waiter came out and performed a similar ceremony to what is typically done in Japanese matcha green tea ceremonies, but the “matcha” consisted of green tomato, apple, and celery. Floral and herbaceous, this dish worked as a great palate cleanser, and contrasted well with the overall heaviness of the other course.



Course fifteen had a pork emoji and consisted of a deep fried curry pork tempura with Japanese mustard.

Course sixteen had a stew pot emoji and was the chef’s take on a curry. It consisted of a coconut ice cream curry, with a hot red pepper curry, served atop a raw scallop.




Course seventeen was a hot dog emoji and was a play on mango chutney. The dish was plated like a hot dog frank inside a potted plant. It consisted of a heavily spiced lamb, cooked in a mango leaf. I am not sure why it was served in a potted plant, but it was interesting. It tasted exactly like a mango chutney.




Course eighteen had a chicken emoji and consisted of fried chicken skin flavored like thai green curry.



Course nineteen had a fire emoji and was Gaggan’s mother’s recipe. The dish was sea bass cooked in a banana leaf with cilantro and wasabi. The wasabi was perfectly balanced and not overpowering, but there was a slight rolling heat towards the end. With the other bold flavors throughout the meal, this dish contrasted well in that it was lighter and more subtle in flavor.





Course twenty had a charcoal emoji and was a crispy lotus stem. The taste was reminiscent of lentils or a good samosa, but slightly more floral.




Course twenty-one had a taco emoji and consisted of a lobster curry with young coconut and coriander.




Course twenty-two had a rose emoji. My notes are a little off here because the plating was impressive. The server brought out two hollow books, and opened them two reveal two roses made of some sort of licorice on some sort of cookie. It was tasty and visually stunning.







Course twenty-three had a champagne emoji and consisted of a Chinese mooncake filled with a grape and Riesling syrup. The mooncake was made of coconut. The dish was served cold, and had a chewy texture. My wife did not care for the filling and noted that it tasted like artificial grape cough syrup. I didn’t mind it as much, but it was not one of our favorites.



Course twenty-four had a lemon emoji and consisted of a coconut ricotta with yuzu white chocolate served on a stick, similar to a Mexican paleta or an ice cream bar. Ricotta and chocolate were prevalent on the front, with the yuzu coming up towards the back.




Course twenty-five had an Indian flag emoji and was a “taste of India”. It consisted of a rice cracker with spiced mango.



Somewhere around the fifteenth course, we finished our wine and decided to get some cocktails. My wife ordered a “smokin’” old fashioned, and I ordered the coconut lassi (gin based I believe). The presentation was impressive. My wife’s drink came covered with a glass dome to seal in the smoke. My drink was served in a coconut, sitting on a wooden box, filled with dry ice. Both drinks were delicious.







Service throughout the meal was spot on, with servers constantly filling our glasses, making small talk, and overall being very attentive. At the end of the meal, the servers brought over a second menu for us to keep. This one had a one or two word summary accompanying the emojis, to help remind the diner what they ate.



In sum, I think what I found most impressive was the amount of flavor Gaggan was able to pack into such small bites. We left incredibly full, and for the price, you can’t beat the value. Overall, Gaggan is an excellent restaurant, and definitely the highlight of our time in Bangkok. I can’t wait to see how he does when he moves to Tokyo.

Following our dinner, we retired for the night, our stomachs full, and hearts brimming with anticipation as we headed the next day to Amanpuri. Paradise awaited us.
Looks lovely and congratulations! What did this meal coast in USD?
TheAAdmiral is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 18, 10:16 am
  #66  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: CLT
Programs: AA Plat, SPG Gold, Hilton Plat
Posts: 128
Re: Harutaka...I've eaten there a few times and the sushi is astounding! I do not know whether their recent relocation had any effect on their Michelin star status.

Tsukiji market can be very illuminating if oyu can be with someone who can fill you in on details regarding the season you are visiting in and what fish to pay attention to. I've felt no urge to try and be there by 3AM to line up for the tuna auction. Admittedly, short of that, you cannot enter the inner market until 10AM when much of the action is done. That being said, the outer market has a wealth of things to see on its own.
Besides, the market is very close to Turret coffee!
I'm going to have to look into Bar Benfidich but my go to has been Bar Gen Yamamoto...you get what is basically a tasting menu of 4 or 6 cocktails made from what is fresh at the time.
davidgrahammd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 18, 11:20 am
  #67  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 105
@TheAAdmiral Gagann was $604 USD, including two cocktails and a bottle of wine. I think the bottle was a higher end Trimbach Riesling, and that was about 50 USD or so, maybe a little more.
@davidgrahammd Definitely go to Benfiddich. We considered heading to Yamamato, but I read a lot of reviews and the consensus seemed to be that the drinks were pretty but not great. The drink tasting intrigued us, but the price, amount of the drink, and the overall reviews turned us off from it. How was your experience at Yamamato?

Last edited by Anlun; Jan 14, 18 at 8:39 pm
Anlun is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 18, 7:33 pm
  #68  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: CLT
Programs: AA Plat, SPG Gold, Hilton Plat
Posts: 128
I guess I have to admit that I don't get the criticism about the amount of the drink. He uses cocktail glasses (gorgeous in and of themselves - he gets a lot of them from Sokichi in Asakusa). It strikes me like arguing about portion size at a restaurant. While there are certainly places that portion size is a selling point, there are others who's tasting menus have smaller portions so you can try more things. You do not go to Ben's to get buzzed. You go to have a flavor specialist (he will not use a liquor whose ingredients are not clearly stated) combine things in ways you might not have imagined.

I apologize if this sounds strident (I don't mean for it to be but maybe my communication isn't the best here)
but think of Gen's like one of the higher end restaurants you enjoyed and not like a "bar"
davidgrahammd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 14, 18, 8:43 pm
  #69  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 105
Originally Posted by davidgrahammd View Post
I guess I have to admit that I don't get the criticism about the amount of the drink. He uses cocktail glasses (gorgeous in and of themselves - he gets a lot of them from Sokichi in Asakusa). It strikes me like arguing about portion size at a restaurant. While there are certainly places that portion size is a selling point, there are others who's tasting menus have smaller portions so you can try more things. You do not go to Ben's to get buzzed. You go to have a flavor specialist (he will not use a liquor whose ingredients are not clearly stated) combine things in ways you might not have imagined.

I apologize if this sounds strident (I don't mean for it to be but maybe my communication isn't the best here)
but think of Gen's like one of the higher end restaurants you enjoyed and not like a "bar"
No apology necessary, I agree with your take on it. I didn't mean to imply that we wanted to go to Yamamoto to get buzzed. When I mentioned the amount, it was more that some of the reviews I read referenced that the portion was so small you couldn't really taste the alcohol. I'm glad to hear that's wrong. We will have to make a trip to Yamamoto next time we are in Tokyo then and give it a shot! Thanks for your comment, next portion should be out tomorrow.
Anlun is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 15, 18, 1:21 pm
  #70  
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: YEG
Programs: TK*G, AC
Posts: 298
Great report, thanks for taking the time to write it.

Originally Posted by Anlun View Post
@estnet Hah yes definitely cognitive dissonance. I don't care if the Emperor himself is visiting that market and offering me the best tamago in all of Japan, I don't think I would wake up at 5 a.m. to go. With all there is to see in Japan I just can't fathom the allure of a fish market. That's like saying "when you come to New York City, make sure to got to the Nathan's hot dog factory store and see how they make there hotdogs!" No one wants to see how the sausage is made.
Even though I also find it a bit dull, I feel the need to defend visiting the fish market. If you're coming from North America you'll likely be up at 5 AM the first day and there's not a hell of a lot else to do at that time, so a visit to Tsukiji is about your only option. If you're arriving in Tokyo from elsewhere in Asia and jetlag isn't an issue, as in your case, I agree that getting up at a godawful hour to look at fish is a terrible idea.
Tifosi is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 15, 18, 3:19 pm
  #71  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 105
Mrs. Anlun and I are not a superstitious bunch, but it has become a tradition for us to visit Sensoji Temple and get our fortunes each time we go to Japan. I initially was averse to this idea, because, as my hero Billy Zane from the movie Titanic would say, "a real man makes his own luck." However, the last time we visited, I ended up getting "The Best Fortune" while Mrs.Cleo over here got "The Worst Fortune" and had to tie it to a tree, less it follow her home like a stray dog you fed scraps to. It should be noted that my "best" fortune stated I would find many treasures by boat. Two years later, and I'm still waiting for my damn treasure! Thus, with the prospect of a second chance to tease her over a bad fortune, we trekked to the temple to see what our futures would hold. Japanese fortunes are derived by shaking a shaker filled with numbered sticks. The stick that falls out has a number corresponding to a cabinet, wherein your respective fortune is held. Apparently it’s a down year for me. I went from the "best" fortune, to just a "Regular" fortune. Mrs. Anlun really improved. She went from "worst" to "regular." SUCCESS!


Mrs. Anlun's second fortune


Both of my fortunes.

Riding our fortune high, we made our way to Rikugien Gardens. It’s a little farther out of the city center, and a little less popular than the main gardens, but it’s definitely worth visiting. The beautiful autumn leaves, tranquil lake, and scenic bridges, offered us a bucolic stroll in an otherwise hectic city. At times, we felt like we were the only ones in the park, until we would pass by a retired couple just enjoying their time together. The park also has an area with various food stands. Seeing older women handing out food on sticks, we mad our way there and devoured another serving of dango, this time it was a shoyu flavored option. It was great, but seeing as the proprietor was a sweet old women who talked our ear off, we knew that going in.























Although I got my daily dango fix, I still wanted to visit a confectionery store I had read about. Unfortunately, the owner was off on vacation and thus the place was closed. Curse you fortune gods! We made our way back to the metro, me walking like an extra in Charlie Brown, Mrs. Anlun consoling me by reminding me I’ve had plenty of good dango. While true, my fomo was in full swing, and thus no consoling could ease my broken heart. As fate would have it, it started to rain while we were walking, the first time it rained on our trip. My Google-fu showed there was a faster path by taking a narrow alleyway to the Metro. As we made our way through the alley in the rain, what to my wondering eyes did appear, but a small storefront selling dango! And inside, was the sweetest oldest woman yet! Without even looking at me, Mrs. Anlun took me inside, and my Cheshire grin lit up the room. The owner seemed shocked that any foreigners would come into her shop. She asked us where we were from, what brought us to Japan, and congratulated us on our honeymoon and thanked us for celebrating it in Japan. She told us she was ninety two years old, and planned on working for as long as possible. She offered us the best mitarashi dango I’ve ever had (keeping true to my age/taste theory), and she threw in some additional daifuku as a present for our wedding. My spirits restored, I privately said a thank you prayer to the fortune gods and we made our way back to the city center.


I had read that Burberry has a special clothing line unique to Japan. It used to be called Blue Label, but now it has branched out into its own company called Crestbridge. We decided to make a stop there to get a gift for a special friend of ours, and so Mrs. Anlun and I can do some shopping. We lucked out that the store was located in Omotesando, and near the restaurant we intended to eat at. Omotesando is one of the many shopping districts in Tokyo, and one can spend an entire day just going from store to store. Thus, I was cautious watching Mrs. Anlun as we ventured through the area towards Crestbridge. Luckily, she was not in a shopping mood, so we made it with my wallet intact. We really liked the offerings at Crestbridge. Mrs. Anlun got herself a lovely plaid wool cape, and I purchased a nice burnt orange cardigan and scarf.

Following our shopping trip, we made our way back to the Ritz. Seeing as we still had some time to kill before dinner, we made our way to the club and decided to have afternoon tea with some champagne. We were very impressed with the club’s afternoon tea offerings, to the point where my wife even exclaimed it was the best offering we’ve had to date (Aman would later cause us to revise this statement).



Our dinner this night was at Ometesando Ukatei. Ukatei is a refined teppanyaki restaurant offering three different set menus for you to choose from, each ranging in price and quality. We make a habit of going to Ukatei each time we come to Tokyo, and it has never disappointed. In classic teppanyaki style, you sit in front of the chef as he cooks your meal. That is were the similarities end. Ukatei offers an innovative menu with refined ingredients from kobe beef, to abalone. Overall the meal was exquisite as usual. After the meal, you are escorted to the parlor, where you can choose from an array of desserts and order coffee if you wish. The parlor has floor to ceiling windows and wonderful city views. It was a great way to finish our meal.


















We intended to walk back to the hotel to see the city a little more, but due to the rain, we just had the restaurant call us taxi back to the hotel. Upon arrival, I took one last trip to the steam room, packed, and went to bed. We would be leaving early the next day to Asaba Ryokan, aka ‘Holy hell is this place real!’


Next Time on A Honeymoon to Remember: Asaba, I Hardly Knew Ye!
nequine and TimeFlyer like this.
Anlun is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 15, 18, 10:58 pm
  #72  
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: bay area, ca
Programs: UA plat, spg plat, aa plat, marriott plat
Posts: 2,553
Nice pictures - when were you there?
Sounds like you speak Japanese - is that right? Might want to consider Le Sputnik for a meal next time
estnet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 16, 18, 7:33 am
  #73  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 105
Originally Posted by estnet View Post
Nice pictures - when were you there?
Sounds like you speak Japanese - is that right? Might want to consider Le Sputnik for a meal next time
Thanks! We were there end of November-December 3. November and December are our favorite times to visit Japan. I speak a little Japanese but it's not great. It's enough to get a "oh wow you speak Japanese!" from the older generation, but not enough to really understand what is going on without context clues. We will definitely hit up Le Sputnik next time we go.
Anlun is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 16, 18, 8:21 pm
  #74  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Singapore
Programs: Krisflyer PPS Club, BA Silver, Marriott Gold
Posts: 96
[QUOTE=Anlun;29186444]
//The ride to The Siam from the airport took about an hour. I have read a number of FT posts about The Siam’s location, but honestly, we didn’t mind. However, for those reading and considering a stay, I will say that The Siam is located on the river, but farther north than the city center. In a normal city, with a well-funded public transportation system, and policies to limit traffic, this would not be a problem. Bangkok is not one of those cities. The skyrail system only goes to a few locations, and does not have many stops that go northwest (none close to the Siam). The Siam, like all the hotels located by the river, offers free boat ferries to any pier location on the river, and there is a skyrail stop about 30 minutes down river. Thus, if you want to go southeast from The Siam, you would likely take the boat for 30 minutes, then walk for approximately 10 minutes from the pier to the skyrail, and then take the skyrail. This is obviously not ideal for people who have reservations (read on for our harrowing journey to Gaggan), or need to be somewhere quickly, but for us it typically wasn’t a problem, and the benefits of staying at the Siam more than make up for its location.//

Apologies if I am being a knob about this - we have a reservation at Gaggan in May and planning on staying at the Siam. Just to clarify, this is the Anantara Siam? Because I'm looking at Google Maps and the distance is about 2.3 miles (3.7km). Walking directions show ~1.5km. Am I missing something? Gaggan doesn't seem to be 5.5 miles away from the hotel. Also, i don't really see Siam as being on the river. This is the address, right?

Anantara Siam Bangkok Hotel, 155 Ratchadamri Rd, Khwaeng Lumphini, Khet Pathum Wan, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10330, Thailand
chandu2013 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Jan 16, 18, 8:30 pm
  #75  
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 202
Enjoyed reading the report so far. Are reservations for Ukatei difficult to make?

Also, some clarification regarding Burberry in Japan: up until 2015, there was a Blue Line and Black line sold under the Burberry brand exclusive to the Japanese market but really had nothing to do with Burberry. The Blue and Black lines were produced under a licensing deal by a Japanese company which ended in 2015. Burberry is now selling it's products in Japan directly.
GiantCow is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread