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British Airways 747 Flight Training FT mini Do – October 2014

British Airways 747 Flight Training FT mini Do – October 2014

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Old Nov 23, 14, 4:24 pm
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British Airways 747 Flight Training FT mini Do – October 2014

British Airways 747 Flight Training FT mini Do – October 2014

Another trip report from me, but something very different this time. It does involve some flights, but the main highlight was a go on one of the full motion BA 747-400 flight simulators which is based at Cranebank next to Heathrow.

The trip itself came out of this thread on the BAEC board.

I would like to add an apology to those who were on this with me, so 12939, Toonfan, and flatlander. I had hoped to do this TR sooner and got part way though a few weeks after, but finishing it got delayed.

Planning
So this is the thread where it started back in March 2014. I had an idea that it might be good to do a FT Do to one of the BA simulators, and I decided to float that idea on the BAEC board to see if anyone might be interested. At the kinds of sums you are paying on those simulators I could only really afford one hour, but my thought was that if we could organise a group then it may be better to go with several people so you have a longer session in the simulator, albeit with the same one hour in total at the controls.

This bit is copied from that thread, but explains my background regarding flying and simulators. I am very enthusiastic/geeky about flying, and I knew a few others on the BAEC board enjoy what happens in the cockpit as well as just being sat in the back enjoying the champagne.

Up until March 2014 my actual flying experience had consisted of one hour in a Cessna 172 which I did in the summer of 2013, and which you can read about here and which I thoroughly enjoyed. I still would like to go for a PPL at some stage, but money and time needed mean it won’t be for at least a year or two yet.

In terms of simulators, as of March 2014 I had been for a couple of Emirates sim sessions at their Aviation Experience near the O2 arena in London. This is very much at the more fun end of simulators. They have two A380 and two 777 simulators. The only things that work on the cockpit are the throttle (inc. reversers), yoke/side stick, rudders, foot brakes, and gear. The primary and navigation displays work but you can't adjust anything on them. There is a speed brake lever and a flaps lever, but neither work. All the buttons shown are just graphics, there are no working buttons. So basically it does feel like a very sophisticated home simulator, kind of FSX but sat in a simplified cockpit. It is not equivalent to a full simulator, and there is no motion. However, if you accept these limitations it is actually very enjoyable for what you pay, usually £45 for 30 minutes.

I also went to Virtual Aerospace near Northampton in February 2014 on their 737 simulator. This is basically a fully workable fixed base cockpit with fsx graphics projected in front. More absorbing and real than the Emirates experience, but still not a full motion or fully wrap-around graphics.

After initially floating the idea for a simulator Do, I had also been on the 737 iPILOT simulators at Westfield in London a few times (I think about 4 in total). The simulator sessions there have been good for me, and after my first visit I was given a discount card which gives me 47% off making a 90 minute session around £165 which is relatively affordable.

More recently I have started to go to a 737 fixed base simulator in Bacup near Manchester. The person who runs it has sessions on Tuesday night to which a few of us go over to and fly around. I have paid for a few sessions there as well. The good thing with this one is that I can go fairly regularly and really start to build on my experience and knowledge, and start to master flows, procedure, the FMC (very much a black box to me until recently), and ATC. I am on a very steep learning curve at the moment, but at least heading in the right direction and getting more experience under my belt. It isn't remotely related to what I do for a living, but I really enjoy it.

In case anyone does want to go for a session sometime at a fixed base simulator my tips would be
  • don't bother doing anything which involves setting a route in the FMC and setting up a flight director at first as it just wastes your time when you only have an hour or so
  • do lots of landings and maybe some circuits
  • try landing somewhere interesting such as at the old Hong Kong Kai Tak airport, or do the Carnasie approach in to JFK
  • do an ILS landing or two with low visibility, Cardiff is a good choice for this
  • don't bother doing gate to gate stuff or setting up the aircraft from cold, I did that first time and it was interesting but during a 1 hour session it does take up too much time

I will also reference another BAFT TR at this stage which I think planted the seed of the idea in my mind, and that is GodAtum’s one he did.

So after quite a lot of planning as you can probably read in the thread, eventually we settled on a date, a time, and that our group would be four strong including myself. I organised the booking with a contact at BA via the BAFT website, and he could not have been more helpful.

The four FT’ers who were doing this were myself, 12939, Toonfan, and flatlander.

Main Costs
Parking at LBA (sentinel) - £26.10
BA, LBA-LHR- LBA (UK Domestic) - £111.74
Doubletree Heathrow Airport - £43.55
BAFT Simulator - £425
Hilton Gatwick - £70.35

LBA & Yorkshire Premier Lounge
Our session was due to start at 1800 so I could get the mid-afternoon flight from LBA (my local airport) to LHR. LBA is around 20-30 minutes drive from where I live in Leeds, but more like 1 hour from where I work. I did have to work on the Friday morning but fortunately I could work at home that morning. I ended up setting off from home around 1230 and getting to the airport just before 1300. The transfer from the car park to the airport was quick, as it typically is with Sentinel, and I was through fast track security in a few minutes and in the lounge.

I have written about the lounge before so I won’t bore you again with all the details or take fresh photos. Basically the Yorkshire Premier lounge run by the airport and used by BA, KLM, and also available for paid entry and priority pass. The lounge is made up of two separate sections, one more family/leisure orientated and the other more business orientated. I went to the business section as normal. I just had my usual diet coke and caught up on some FT messages and threads.

There are some photos of the Yorkshire Premier lounge on my Zurich trip report. Although it is not the best lounge in the world, and does lack any windows, the airport does have a lack of general seating airside unless you want to eat or drink at one of the bars.

I did learn something new about the lounge on this visit though. There is free food in the lounge included sweets, chocolates, tea cakes, bread and a toaster, crisps, olives etc. but no hot food (apart from the toast of course). However, if you want hot food you can go to Saltaire bar which is outside an opposite the lounge to pay and order food there, tell them you are in the lounge, and they will bring it through. There is a menu on the LBA website in case this is of interest to anyone.

British Airways BA1343
LBA-LHR(T5)
G-EUPW, A319-100
UK Domestic, seat 1A
10 October 2014 - 14:40d, 15:50a (scheduled)
Duration - 1h 10m (scheduled)


Boarding was called at 1410. The flight was reasonably full. Pushback was slightly delayed as the flight crew had been asked by Heathrow to wait. We took off from runway 14 and headed south.


Lining up runway 14


View of the terminal as we accelerate down the runway

Drinks and food service was quickly underway less than 10 minutes in to the flight. We landed about 15 minutes late after being held at Bovingdon so ended up landing around 20 minutes late on runway 27L.


View of London City airport

We taxied to the domestic gates at the north end of T5A.

My plan was to go to the Doubletree where I and two of the others were staying, and then head to Cranebank together. There is no bus service from T5 which goes past the hotel so it seemed the best option was to get the tube to T123 (free) and then get either the 105 or 111 bus from the bus station at Heathrow Central (not free).

BAFT – 747-400 Simulator
I met up with Toonfan at the Doubletree and we walked down to Cranebank together which took around 20 minutes. After a brief wait at the security gate our BA contact came out to let us in and we also met up with our instructor for the evening who is a BA 747 first officer (I’ll refer to him as FO throughout). As we were a little early and waiting for the other two to arrive our BA contact offered to show us around the safety training centre which is all part of the same complex at Cranebank.

FT’er BotB has previously organised FT outings to the safety courses at BAFT which you can read about here. He organised one in early in 2014 and he is looking at doing one in early 2015. These are really useful things to do if you are a frequent flyer. I keep meaning to go on one but haven’t been able to attend any of the ones organised by BotB yet. They are also open to the general public to attend.







Couple of shots of the 747 and 737 exteriors. Despite the fact I have sat up in the 747 upper deck a few times now I don’t quite think I appreciated how high it was and therefore how high up the slide is if you did have to evacuate from up there.

We got taken in to the 737 mock cabin where they do a lot of their emergency evacuation training.



They can simulate smoke and alarms going off, which others have told me is very disorientating. We then got to have a go at removing the emergency over wing exit. This is the correct weight in the mock up cabin. What I would say is that the exit is very heavy (hopefully any adrenaline would help with that) and also cumbersome. You need to lean right back in your seat if you are removing it to avoid hitting yourself. Also once removed the action is to rotate it on its side before shoving it out of the hole you have just created – which probably means whacking the person in the middle seat – that person does not have the luxury of knowing what you are about to do. So the conclusion of our little test is that it isn’t a joke when they ask whether you feel able to attend to the emergency exit if you are sat it that row, and don’t sit in the middle seat.







Next we went in to look at the 747 mock up.




I believe this is based on a 747-200 hence the spiral stairs to the upper deck.


Upper deck emergency exit


Upper deck seating, not like the 747-400s!

By this time the other two attendees had arrived so we were up to full strength. We headed off to the simulators.


Passing a 777-200 simulator on the way which was in use – they pretty much get used 24 hours a day


And our simulator for the evening

After a short safety briefing which included an explanation of escape routes we boarded.



12939 offered to go first. The set up in the simulator is that it is all as in real life up to the back of where the two pilots sit. After that there is a simulator control panel on the left which lets you set up lots of different scenarios and various failures. There are three jump seats in the rear half of the simulator, with a central one (where the above photo was taken) and two behind one on each side. You can therefore fit four people in and one instructor. Our FO took up the right hand seat and the rest of us rotated around the captain’s and the three jump seats for the evening.




Upper simulator control panel


Lower simulator control panel


Whole panel

The simulator was set up at the holding point NB2E for 27L at LHR.



Once we were all seated and strapped in (seriously you need to wear your belts in the simulator – it is very real remember!) we were off. First job was for 12939 to taxi on to the runway. On a 747 there is a tiller on each side as shown by this photo which provides for nose wheel steering at taxi speeds.




With a little bit of throttle we were moving


Line up and hold 27L

So as you can see from the photo very realistic. The procedure for take off is to advance the throttles to around 50% and check the engines are stable, then advance the throttle to around 70% before pressing the TO/GA buttons. On the front of the throttles are some small buttons which you press to activate take off power, and once this is done the throttles advance to take off power on their own as they are motorised. The pilot flying then keeps his/her hand on the throttles during the take off roll up to V1 (i.e. the point where you can abort the take-off) and then hands off the throttle.

The one thing that did surprise me was that you really do feel pushed back in to your seat when the aircraft is accelerating down the runway. Apparently the simulator tilts backwards during the take off roll so you get that accelerating feeling, but as the visual reference remains level your brain interprets the movement as if you are feeling the acceleration.

You can also see a SID programmed in on the navigation display (the one on the right immediately in front of the pilot, although we did a right hand circuit instead. After climbing to around 3000ft and turning to the right 12939 levelled off and did a downwind leg before turning back in to land on 27L.



First landing by 12939

You can see in the video that the missed approach course is shown as well on the navigation display, so the magenta line which turns off to the left shows effectively what you would follow if you did a go-around.

Also the video does show some flickering of the graphics, but I think this is due to the mismatch in frame rates between my camera and the projection, there is no flickering visible to the naked eye.

So a very nice take off and landing by 12939. Also just to pre-empt any questions my set up for the photos and the videos was a Canon 5d MkIII, 17-40L 4.0 lens and RODE VideoMic Pro Stereo On-Camera Microphone.

Next I was up in the captain’s seat.


You can see the back of the pedestal here


Forget 1A or 64A, this is the best seat in a 747


Advancing the throttles for take off

One thing I immediately noticed on the 747 was the throttles are actually very wide. I don’t have very wide hands and it was quite tricky to get my right hand so that it was comfortably controlling all four throttles. It was very different to the 737 throttles I am used to. The other thing I noticed was how sensitive the controls were in roll. The yoke was relatively heavy for pitch as you might expect, but in roll you really didn’t need to put much input in to get it to turn. The sensitivity wasn’t a bad thing, but surprising for such a large heavy aircraft. It really flies very nicely and doesn’t need much effort.

You can probably see from this photo our right hand circuit for 27L and not following the SID programmed in- I think it would have been a BROOKMANS PARK 7G SID which is programmed in from looking at the navigation display.




Turning in to line up for landing on 27L


Landing 27L

So here is the video of my first landing. Before you click on it, be aware there is no sound. The external mic I use needs to be turned on, and when I had done the first video I turned it off to conserve the batteries whilst I was just taking photos. Unfortunately when I handed the camera to one of the others to do videos whilst I was flying I forgot to turn the mic back on. Anyway, I noticed this later on so sound returns from video 4 onwards.

First landing by me (no sound)

The other thing I learnt from our FO was that on the 747s they typically do go to manual throttle control on landing which is a bit unusual. I wonder whether this is because the 747 auto throttle is perhaps a bit slow? Anyway I noted this as my understanding is that on most aircraft these days the autothrottle is left in to maintain speed on the approach and only taken out just before touchdown. As pilot flying you would have one hand on the throttles in case the autothrottle failed, but you would normally be relying on the autothrottle to maintain the speed set. The throttle levers are motorised so you would feel them moving, but you would not be moving them.

My second landing (no sound again)

I think the second landing may have been with some wind, or it might not have been and I could have been rubbish. On the first round of landings we all did them in fairly benign conditions, with wind and turbulence coming up in the subsequent rounds.

After two landings one other thing I noticed was that you really need to put more input in to flare well in a 747 than a 737. In a 737 it is quite a small pull back of the yoke whilst in a 747 it is more pronounced. This shouldn’t have surprised me, but perhaps explains why some of my landings were not quite a smooth as they could have been.

So after my turn and two landings we rotated again with flatlander up next.

flatlander’s first landing on 27L, sound from 0:15

flatlander’s second landing on 27L





Sorry about the fuzziness, on the photos, it was due to my lack of skill on the camera rather than flatlander’s flying.

Lastly it was Toonfan’s turn to get in to the captain’s seat so we all rotated around again.


Toonfan lined up and ready for take off





And a few shots of Toonfan coming in for landing






This one really gives you a sense of how realistic it all looks.

Toonfan’s first landing

Toonfan’s second landing

After we had all had a go we were scheduled for a half time break. Time really flew by, and certainly it didn’t feel as if we had been in the simulator for half our time which shows how immersive it really is.


With the simulator powered down, a last shot before heading for our five minute break

Our BA contact was there to meet us of the simulator and we all went for a short break with a coffee or tea, and a chance to do a little debrief part way through.

Coming up though we had lots of low visibility landings, turbulence, winds, and what happens when you stall a 747 (not to be tried in real life!).

So after our break we went back in the simulator and started again. This time though we were going to face less benign conditions than before. Up first was 12939.


Initially we were looking at starting at LAS, but we ended up deciding to go to LHR as before


Gives you an idea of the low visibility conditions we would be facing




Getting ready for the second take off







Just to add to the drama 12939 wanted to try an engine failure on takeoff.

12939 handles an engine failure after V1 on takeoff

One thing you can see in this video at 0:06 is you can hear and see the autothrottle advance the motorised throttle levers to take off power (TO/GA setting) after 12939 has pressed the TO/GA buttons. So actually the pilot doesn’t push the throttles all the way forward but instead this is done by the autothrottle.

The engine failure happens after V1 which is the last opportunity to abort the takeoff and be able to stop on the runway. After V1 you take the failure in to the air and deal with it there. You can hear the thud at 0:30 when engine 1 fails. 12939 continues with the takeoff and tries to counteract the asymmetric thrust with yoke and rudder since there is now far more thrust coming from the right side of the aircraft than the left – you can see how much loss of an engine affects the aircraft. Also you can see at 0:50 the FO advises 12939 to use the rudder trim wheel at back of pedestal which 12939 then reaches for. This is a wheel which basically allows you to adjust the rudder so that you get a set amount of yaw and you don’t have to keep continually applying rudder with the rudder pedals to counteract the engine failure.

12939 landing with the engine failure

Even more impressively 12939 then landed with the engine failure in low visibility and with some turbulence and winds – and did a pretty good job of it.

So after that excitement I was in again. I had the same low visibility, and some turbulence and winds, but no engine failure.


Me getting settled back in to the captain’s seat


Trying to work out a hand hold so I can move four throttles


First landing in low visibility

Low visibility landing with turbulence and cross winds

As you can see from the camera shake, there was a lot of turbulence. Basically in those low visibility conditions you are using the instruments to bring the aircraft down on the correct approach profile, and you have indications on your displays which show the lateral and vertical position of the aircraft compared to where you should be. There is no point looking up as there is nothing to see. I think I only looked up at around 100ft when the runway comes in to view. Annoyingly after a good approach I still didn’t get that flare right.


Not quite on the centreline

Next flatlander was up to having a go with the poor conditions.



I think you really get an impression of how much simulated turbulence there was

Go-around

As you can see from the second video flatlander did a go-around as he wanted to see how that felt. The go-around happens at approximately 300ft, flatlander presses the TO/GA button on the throttles, the FO quickly puts the gear up and put flaps from 30 for landing to I think 15.

And back around for landing

We also asked the FO to show us landing in those conditions, and he does so with a bit of a commentary as well.

How to do it – our FO makes it look easy

Finally, back up again was Toonfan again having a go at landing in poor conditions.





Videos of Toonfan’s landings with lots of turbulence and wind.

First landing

Second landing

Back up again was 12939 and this time he was eager to see what happens when you stall a 747.

Takeoff by 12939


Bit of a close up of the displays


Another close up of the displays

Reducing speeds at altitude in preparation for the stall

Stall

So you can see in the stall video that you get the stick-shaker and the stall warning noise. This is not the stall but it is the warning that you are approaching a stall and should take corrective action to avoid it (nose down and push the throttles up). Despite the FO’s encouragement 12939 wanted to see exactly what happens at the stall so kept the throttles back and nose up. He does apply the throttle and nose down and also gets a secondary stall after attempting to level off.

For the last landing of the evening the FO set up 12939 coming in to LHR, but with severe turbulence and a very strong crosswind – although he may not have quite told 12939 that was what he was doing

Last landing of the evening

As you can see though 12939 handled it very well and did a good job of getting us down.

So there you go, end of the session and we made our way out. The four hours really did go quickly, but doing it as a group was a good way to enjoy the simulator. Our FO really was excellent and our BA contact was also really helpful both organising it and on the night.


Me at the end outside the simulator

After that we retreated to the Doubletree bar and had a post simulator drink and debrief.

Last edited by KARFA; Nov 26, 14 at 4:09 am
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Old Nov 23, 14, 4:28 pm
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Saturday
Come Saturday I had a bit of a lazy morning. However, one of the advantages of the Doubletree which is towards the end of 27R at LHR is that if you have a south facing room you can do a bit of plane spotting, so here are a few photos mostly from the comfort of my room.













The rest of the day I made my way in to London and saw the first two of the James plays at the National Theatre.

Sunday
On Sunday I made my way to the RAF Museum which is in north London near Colindale tube station on the northern line. It was a really enjoyable museum to look around and well worth the trip there.


At the entrance


Spitfire and Hurricane models outside




Gloster Meteor – first British jet fighter


And the engine which made it possible


Harrier


The rotatable thrust outlets to enable the Harrier to perform its party tricks




Tornado GR4 with a Buccaneer behind




Lancaster bomber




Even a BA mock up cockpit for a Tristar




F-4 Phantom & cockpit


Wessex helicopter of the Royal Squadron


Gazelle helicopter

They do have a Vulcan bomber but unfortunately it is pushed in to a corner of one of the buildings which means you can’t see it very well.








Look at that huge wing on the Vulcan


English Electric Lightening – an incredibly fast jet, but poor range

So after an excellent few hours at the museum I headed off to Heathrow for my flight home.

LHR & CCR
On arrival at Heathrow I went through south security and in to the CCR using the secret door. I had something to eat and a glass of champagne (Laurent-Perrier Grand Siècle), and the gate for the LBA flight eventually posted at 1830 so I headed off shortly after.





Wine list




Menu


Salmon starter


Rib-eye steak


Affogato dessert


Photo of a relatively quiet CCR

British Airways BA1344
LHR(T5)-LBA
G-EUPO, A319-100
UK Domestic, seat 1A
12 October 2014 - 19:20d, 20:20a (scheduled)
Duration - 1h (scheduled)


Nothing really to report for this short domestic flight. It was pleasant enough and I just had a coffee to pass the time.

Conclusion
I really hope you enjoyed this trip report and get a sense of how realistic the simulator is. I honestly could spend a whole day on it. Talking to the others afterwards in the bar the comments were extremely positive about the experience and how much we enjoyed it. The full motion simulators clearly aren’t cheap at £400+ for 1 hour, but if you are interested they are definitely worth the money. If you do want to do a full motion simulator I would recommend having one or two session in a fixed based first just so you can get used to a few things in a cheaper simulator and really get good value from the more expensive full motions ones. I will probably organise another trip to Cranebank in late 2015 so perhaps this will become an annual outing

Thank you to my fellow simulator pilots, we had a good group and doing this as a group really made it very enjoyable. Also thank you to BA and both our BA contact and our FO.

Last edited by KARFA; Dec 10, 14 at 3:56 am
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Old Nov 23, 14, 9:46 pm
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What a fun report! Very jealous you had that experience. Also, I liked the RAF Museum pictures, I've been there at least a half a dozen times but not since 2001 so it was nice to see it again. Thanks for posting
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Old Nov 24, 14, 1:17 am
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Excellent report! Thanks for shaing!
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Old Nov 24, 14, 2:39 am
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Originally Posted by CMK10 View Post
What a fun report! Very jealous you had that experience. Also, I liked the RAF Museum pictures, I've been there at least a half a dozen times but not since 2001 so it was nice to see it again. Thanks for posting
Thanks CMK10. It really was challenging and good fun. I will organise it agaiin next year and if you are over in the UK at the time you are welcome to come. I had been meaning to go to the RAF Museum for a while now but only just got around to it, certainly worth going to.

Originally Posted by kniesel View Post
Excellent report! Thanks for shaing!
Thanks kniesel, glad you enjoyed it.
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Old Nov 24, 14, 4:30 am
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Wow, what an awesome experience, KARFA!

Love the photo's at the RAF Museum too, especially the might Vulcan.
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Old Nov 24, 14, 4:48 am
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Brilliant report KARFA, the videos look excellent and give a real sense of the experience. Well done for organising and thanks again for sharing!
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Old Nov 24, 14, 5:10 am
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Good one, KARFA!!

Apart from the 'flying' aspects, you really put that TR together very nicely indeed. No wonder it took a while to get it published.
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Old Nov 24, 14, 5:48 am
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Excellent report! It's great to see something really new and interesting.

You've had the chance to do something that I've always wanted to. Next time around please count me in!

One thing to note about the overwing exit simulator, on the A320 the hatch is much smaller as it doesn't have the large surround on it. Hopefully that would make things a little easier in real life. As I understand it, the hatch weighs about 20kg, so not light at all.

The mock ups are used for new cabin crew training but also existing cabin crew and not just BA either. Qantas used to use them, I'm not sure if they still do now. "SEP" on the front of the 747 mock up stands for 'Safety and Emergency Procedures'.
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Old Nov 24, 14, 9:11 am
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Really enjoyed reading this KARFU! Thanks for posting such a detailed report.

I'd definitely be up for doing this if you ever organise another.

Stuart
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Old Nov 24, 14, 9:22 am
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Originally Posted by KARFA View Post
I would like to add an apology to those who were on this with me, so 12939, Toonfan, and flatlander. I had hoped to do this TR sooner and got part way though a few weeks after, but finishing it got delayed.
Don't worry, I haven't been clock-watching

Unfortunately when I handed the camera to one of the others to do videos whilst I was flying I forgot to turn the mic back on. Anyway, I noticed this later on so sound returns from video 4 onwards.
I shall not be giving up my day job to pursue a career as cameraman anytime soon.
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Old Nov 24, 14, 9:27 am
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Originally Posted by DanielW View Post
Wow, what an awesome experience, KARFA!

Love the photo's at the RAF Museum too, especially the might Vulcan.
Thanks DanielW. I don't think I have stood that close to a Vulcan before. It is a shame the Museum have put it facing in to a corner though.

Originally Posted by crazy8534 View Post
Brilliant report KARFA, the videos look excellent and give a real sense of the experience. Well done for organising and thanks again for sharing!
Glad you enjoyed the TR crazy8534.

Originally Posted by T8191 View Post
Good one, KARFA!!

Apart from the 'flying' aspects, you really put that TR together very nicely indeed. No wonder it took a while to get it published.
Thanks T8191. I had hoped to finish TR a few weeks after our session but I got about half way through and didn't have the time to finish it off. I was at home the weekend just gone so spent most of yesterday evening completing the TR.

Originally Posted by matthandy View Post
Excellent report! It's great to see something really new and interesting.

You've had the chance to do something that I've always wanted to. Next time around please count me in!

One thing to note about the overwing exit simulator, on the A320 the hatch is much smaller as it doesn't have the large surround on it. Hopefully that would make things a little easier in real life. As I understand it, the hatch weighs about 20kg, so not light at all.

The mock ups are used for new cabin crew training but also existing cabin crew and not just BA either. Qantas used to use them, I'm not sure if they still do now. "SEP" on the front of the 747 mock up stands for 'Safety and Emergency Procedures'.
Thanks matthandy and for the comments on the cabin safety simulators. I will organise it for around the same time next year. I deliberately didn't really advertise it beyond the BAEC board this time just to keep it relatively small and see how it went. As it seemed to be a success I shall see if we can get a bigger group next year.

Originally Posted by FastTrak2Elite View Post
Really enjoyed reading this KARFU! Thanks for posting such a detailed report.

I'd definitely be up for doing this if you ever organise another.

Stuart
Glad you enjoyed it FastTrak2Elite. There will definitely be one next year so watch out for it, you would be more than wlecome to join.
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Old Nov 24, 14, 10:22 am
  #13  
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Southampton
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Brilliant!

looks like a superb few hours guys, gutted i couldn't commit in the end! Will endeavour to make it next year!!
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Old Nov 24, 14, 12:29 pm
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Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: England
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Great TR, the RAF Museum at Hendon is excellent, I remember that Harrier flying at Guetersloh when I was there. If you haven't been to Cosford Cold war museum, that is worth a visit.
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Old Nov 24, 14, 12:36 pm
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Join Date: Apr 2009
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Brilliant KARFA - nice to read something out of the ordinary every now and again.
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