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YOU travel? How the one-in-a-million girl rolls…

YOU travel? How the one-in-a-million girl rolls…

Old Jul 3, 12, 9:11 am
  #76  
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
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Thumbs up brilliant

the world recently lost one of the best writers, Nora Ephron. She wrote about everyday things, but with wit and clarity, and more than a soupcon of devilish mischief. Jen, you are a brilliant writer, IMHO on the level of Nora Ephron, and if you are not already, I can see a long publishing career in your future. Thanks for sharing with us!
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Old Jul 3, 12, 9:15 am
  #77  
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
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Originally Posted by bowdenj View Post
Such a hilarious line!!!!
I chortled, too!

Thanks, jenpdx, for allowing us into your life (and your boyfriend's).
I find myself looking forward to your updates.

Last edited by dahorns; Jul 3, 12 at 9:40 am Reason: darn typos
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Old Jul 3, 12, 1:02 pm
  #78  
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Santa Barbara, CA, USA
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Great TR - could be a blog

Wonderful TR. This would be a wonderful blog. Great information and experiences that non-flyertalk folks would enjoy and should read too. Some editing would be needed though in regards to non-frequent fliers and what we sometimes think of them.
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Old Jul 3, 12, 2:21 pm
  #79  
formerly known as lady1964
 
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This is just an amazing TR. So informative it doesn't need pictures, I can get images in my mind of Jen waiting in the security line, boarding, aboard the aircraft and in HKG, everything is described so well and with humour and a great sense of not wanting pity or sympathy from anyone. At the risk of offending and I seriously don't mean any, I am so full of admiration for disabled people who take life by the horns and just get on with life.

Thank you Jen for taking the time & trouble to write this, you have an amazing memory (or do you keep notes on a pad to help you remember the smallest detail?).

I am so looking forward to reading the rest of your report and once again, I thank you
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Old Jul 3, 12, 2:39 pm
  #80  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: The People's Republic
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Brava! Thank you (!) for posting such witty and informative Trip Reports.

While I don't face the level of challenge you do, back in the day I was a disabled student at the local Univ and served on the Program Accessibility Committee. I remember the group having to over justify and fight for every curb cut and automatic door opener.

I'm going to pass this thread along to that office, where the students and staff will appreciate your wonderfully engaging writing style, your humor, and the message that it is very possible to travel the world.
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Old Jul 3, 12, 2:56 pm
  #81  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
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Thank you for taking the time to do this fabulous trip report.

You are my new HERO!. I am in awe of your strength.

You are indeed ... one in a million!!
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Old Jul 3, 12, 4:00 pm
  #82  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
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Originally Posted by jenpdx View Post
I know this is a touchy subject, so I should clarify what I mean when I use terms like “truly disabled” and “faker.” There are a surprisingly large number of Americans who are deeply convinced that their ingrown toenails limit their ability to perform activities of daily living to the point of rendering them disabled, and who might take issue with someone like me doubting their status. I already talked about the enormous fraud involving handicap parking placards -9% of Oregon drivers assert being unable to walk 200 feet-, but the imaginary disabilities don’t stop there. In a 2004 survey, almost 25% of respondents self-identified as disabled, and in one of my volunteer jobs I recently encountered a guy who attended a rock concert, dove off a stage, bit off a piece of his tongue, and wanted help filing a disability claim. Call me crazy, but from where I sit, all this looks a little bit ridiculous.

At the same time I recognize that there are plenty of people who have a tough life even though they are not as severely disabled than I am. People who suffer from arthritis, had recent chemotherapy, have chronic pain, etc - all this stuff makes life hard, and it may well be appropriate for someone without a visible disability to pre-board. In fact, it doesn't irk me at all when others pre-board; it's really an issue of efficiency, how do we get the plane loaded as quickly as possible? If the current trends continue, maybe some day we'll see zone pre-boarding ("Let me acquaint you with our boarding procedure. First, we will be boarding disabled passengers assigned to zone one, then disabled zone two, followed by disabled zone three. Then, families with young children, followed by active members of the military and those seated in First class. Diamond and Platinum elites, followed by Gold and Silver, or if you're seated in row 6 or one of the exit rows. Then, elite members of our airline partners. Finally, Mr and Mrs Smith in seats 37AB will be invited to board once general boarding is called.)"

Where the abuse becomes hard to stomach is in cases where people like me suffer. Parking is a good example. 9% of Oregonians have a placard (my hunch is that no more than 2-3% qualify under the law), and although many may only use their frivolous placards to park for free on the streets of downtown Portland (where on workdays 20-25% of street parking is taken up by placard holders, who may save in excess of $2000 per year in parking charges), some also take up handicap spots at stores etc. This is unfortunate because only 1.8% of parking spots are designated as handicap, creating a serious shortage. I can't tell you how often I've circled around looking for parking (and in a few cases even returned home when I couldn't find parking at all). I don't care about people scamming free parking (although it's poor policy to grant free parking to such a huge chunk of the population & to make it available basically for the asking), but the marked handicap spots ought to be reserved for those who truly need them. However, this problem is caused by an element of scarcity, which isn't an issue with pre-boarding.
You need to move here. I go up to my local Lowes and there are 4 parking rows 10 spaces deep right in front of the store for handicap parking, in a parking lot that may only have 300 parking spaces. lol
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Old Jul 3, 12, 7:12 pm
  #83  
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Thanks jenpdx, your writing is wonderful.
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Old Jul 8, 12, 8:52 pm
  #84  
 
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Jen, come back! I just can't wait for your next installment!

You are a very good writer. Entertaining and informative at the same time!
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Old Jul 9, 12, 3:25 pm
  #85  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
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This is such an eye opening trip report. Really fantastic. As an architecture major I'm always interested in making life easier for people with various disabilities, and this report was excellent in that regard. Keep it up.
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Old Jul 9, 12, 11:34 pm
  #86  
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
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Originally Posted by jenpdx View Post
I know this is a touchy subject, so I should clarify what I mean when I use terms like “truly disabled” and “faker.” There are a surprisingly large number of Americans who are deeply convinced that their ingrown toenails limit their ability to perform activities of daily living to the point of rendering them disabled, and who might take issue with someone like me doubting their status. I already talked about the enormous fraud involving handicap parking placards -9% of Oregon drivers assert being unable to walk 200 feet-, but the imaginary disabilities don’t stop there. In a 2004 survey, almost 25% of respondents self-identified as disabled, and in one of my volunteer jobs I recently encountered a guy who attended a rock concert, dove off a stage, bit off a piece of his tongue, and wanted help filing a disability claim. Call me crazy, but from where I sit, all this looks a little bit ridiculous.
I have always wanted in my heart to believe that people like that didn't exist. It was an 'ignorance is bliss' attempt at retaining my faith and humanity. Recently I found out that my aunt used disability services to get a wheelchair ride and preboarding at LAX. Her reasoning was that her cat, which she brought on board, was to heavy for her to carry by herself. So she put on an old air cast from a sprained ankle a year ago and took advantage. She was proud of herself. What the hell is wrong with people like that? I understand the annoyance of being asked about your real disability, but the cynic in me wonders if it being more acceptable to ask might scare a few of the fakers into the background afraid of the potential for shame.

Anyways, thank you for writing I am enjoying it immensely and really find the window into how others travel always interesting.
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Old Jul 11, 12, 3:04 pm
  #87  
 
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I'm really enjoying your trip report. It reminds me of my first trip to Asia many, many years ago. I stayed at the IC (then the Regent) and well remember the thick carpeting in the halls to this day. And the thrill of opening the curtains and seeing the HK skyline.

Your reports should be mandatory reading for more than travelers! I worked with a quadripalegic and it was amazing how little people understood about accessibility. I had to call site services several times to complain that he could not get in the handicapped doorway because there was a 4-inch high sill. And he could not use the long ramp from the basement to the first floor because it was too steep and long (and he had to rest and feared rolling backwards all the way to the bottom). And the handicapped spot was not big enough for his wheelchair lift to lower outside of the van. We've come a long way, but still have far to go. Someone like you, with your grace and good humor, will have a positive impact. Keep up the travel and writing; it will make us all more sensitive and aware.
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Old Jul 15, 12, 12:46 pm
  #88  
 
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This is by far the most entertaining thing I've read on FlyerTalk.
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Old Jul 16, 12, 12:18 am
  #89  
 
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Originally Posted by jenpdx View Post
The woman manning the turnstiles is very helpful, and insists on breaking a HK$100 bill so we can buy a token instead of using our Octopus stored value cards, “so you can enjoy discount.” Disabled people can save HK$.60 (US$.08) off the HK$2.00 (US$.25) fare, and who’d pass on that, especially if it only comes at the cost of missing a ferry and ending up with a pocketful of change, specifically HK$98.60 in mostly HK$2 and HK$5 coins?
This is to a regular, local HK-person perfectly normal. They will bend over backwards if it retains cents in their pockets. Ms Viking is from HK, so I have seen first-hand cash-saving behaviours that continue to surprise and amaze even to this day. And very few things can put a swifter smile on a local HKers face than the realisation that they just saved 60 HK cents. As the old story goes: Stick two dirt-poor HKers in a cave and seal it for five years; then open and watch them drive out in their Mercedes cars, bought with profits they made while trading each other rocks.
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Old Jul 16, 12, 12:14 pm
  #90  
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
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Thank you so much for this brilliant write-up. I enjoyed every second of it.

Looking forward to your next post.
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