Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > TravelBuzz
Reload this Page >

When you stand up to people who cut in line at the airport, how do they respond?

When you stand up to people who cut in line at the airport, how do they respond?

Old Apr 11, 22, 9:59 am
  #16  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Dallas, TX
Programs: American Airlines
Posts: 27,127
I've heard in Japan people are very disciplined and line up pertinent to their boarding zone. Is this accurate?
trooper likes this.
enviroian is online now  
Old Apr 11, 22, 10:45 am
  #17  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Ontario, Canada
Programs: Aeroplan, IHG, Enterprise, Avios, Nexus
Posts: 7,974
Originally Posted by WeekendTraveler View Post
Yes, it matters. If everyone would take turns and play by the rules, travel would be less stressful and more efficient.
My stress level is reduced by not sweating the small stuff. YMMV.
BlueJayFlyer likes this.
Badenoch is offline  
Old Apr 11, 22, 11:47 am
  #18  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Programs: American Airlines, National Car Rental
Posts: 944
Originally Posted by Badenoch View Post
My stress level is reduced by not sweating the small stuff. YMMV.
That's a fair position and understood. To each his own--lawlessness and disorder and rulebreaking just make me go bonkers. To me, lawlessness and rulebreaking are not "fair"--and in my view, someone who "cheats" on small things will cheat on big things, and neither is acceptable.
WeekendTraveler is offline  
Old Apr 11, 22, 12:56 pm
  #19  
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Back in Reds Country (DAY/CVG). Previously: SEA & SAT.
Programs: Delta DM, AA PLT, UA Gold, Marriott Ambassador, Hilton Gold
Posts: 9,276
Originally Posted by hotelboy View Post
Does it really matter? Everyone on the plane arrives at the same time.
I do realize this problem is caused as much by the airlines as it is passengers between bag fees and cramming as many seats as possible into the aircraft but it matters when I want/need to board and secure overhead space but it matters even more for securing overhead space near my row so when we land and I have a tight connection, I don't have to swim upstream to try to get my carryon bag, further delaying my getting to the next flight and possibly misconnecting. If you're on a nonstop flight or your final flight of the day, maybe less of a big deal.
​​
I also prefer to be in my seat as soon as possible to reduce the chance of a seat poacher taking my seat and then trying to guilt me into moving since they're "already settled in" (and unfortunately FA's can sometimes be compliant in this too).
strickerj likes this.
ATOBTTR is offline  
Old Apr 11, 22, 4:14 pm
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,070
I prefer to board early as I like to get settled in before dealing with any last minute stuff that always seems to occur. And since I don't get to sit in the front very often, it's doesn't hurt to get secure overhead space.

IME, many of these queue jumpers also tend to be middle seaters who want to try to poach a better seat (who often end up having a doubly bad day). I have called a few of them out, usually because they ram into me while trying to push through. Usually get the stinkeye afterwords from them.
Tanic, TPACjv and WeekendTraveler like this.
StuckInYYZ is offline  
Old Apr 11, 22, 4:34 pm
  #21  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Palm Beach/ New England
Programs: AA EXP 3MM, DL GM, Marriott Platinum
Posts: 4,235
Some airlines do better than others at policing the lines. I feel like we have gone over this issue many times, but here are my top points:

-- If your boarding group is called, and "the queue" doesn't move, that means those queued passengers are not a part of the called boarding group. Bypassing that queue to go to the scanner after a few seconds is acceptable.
-- AA often has more of a scrum than a queue. Don't know why, but people often form a mob behind the partitions rather than an orderly line within the partitions. Same rule as above. If the scrum does not move, bypassing it to get to the scanner is acceptable.
-- If there is an orderly queue which is moving along as boarding groups are called, then the correct thing to do is to get in the back of the queue.
-- If you have minimal luggage and especially an aisle seat, it is usually nicer to wait for the masses to board before following suit. You might want to let the gate agent know you are present, but waiting until the jetway is empty.
WeekendTraveler likes this.
fastflyer is offline  
Old Apr 11, 22, 5:46 pm
  #22  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Programs: American Airlines, National Car Rental
Posts: 944
Originally Posted by fastflyer View Post
-- If you have minimal luggage and especially an aisle seat, it is usually nicer to wait for the masses to board before following suit. You might want to let the gate agent know you are present, but waiting until the jetway is empty.
If you're in Group 1, same? Great post--I'm just curious about the sentences above.
WeekendTraveler is offline  
Old Apr 11, 22, 6:18 pm
  #23  
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,070
Originally Posted by enviroian View Post
I've heard in Japan people are very disciplined and line up pertinent to their boarding zone. Is this accurate?
I can't speak for Japan (although it would not surprise me). Taiwanese airlines are usually pretty good at wrangling North American folk into lines. They usually have things set up with people holding up signs with boarding group and people line up behind. The initial mass of wheelchairs goes first (a bit chaotic, but still quite organized). After that, it's kinda like a tour group, you follow the leader.
TPACjv likes this.
StuckInYYZ is offline  
Old Apr 12, 22, 6:13 am
  #24  
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: South Cambridgeshire, UK
Programs: BA, QF, Avis, Marriott
Posts: 33
Ah this pearler.

YMMW - it depends upon airline, country, time of the day. For example, a BA flight from Cairo in the off-season, will tend to have fewer top-tier flyers, compared to, say, a European capital > LHR on a Friday afternoon, when a fair whack of the aircraft will be Golds and above - and therefore all in Group 1. I remember once flying from ARN to LHR around 6:00pm, and I swear well over half the aircraft were Golds. Group 1 was well-behaved, though.

Americans tend to worry about this the most - and, it is understandable, as it is a genuine and very tiresome bun fight for overhead bin space on domestic US flights. As undignified as WN's system is, at least it works.

For me, I tend to let queue jumpers go. If two minutes really means that much to them, let them have it. It is satisfying when the gate agent sends queue jumpers back. QF ground crew are ruthless. It's very satisfying to watch.
TPACjv likes this.
evanstim is offline  
Old Apr 12, 22, 7:03 am
  #25  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: LAX
Programs: AA EP, MUCCI, Proudly BA Blue,.
Posts: 843
There is nowhere better to witness a human’s misplaced sense of entitlement than at the gate of a departing flight. A modern day anthropologist should write a book about it - or better yet, a documentary with hidden cameras.
matinicus rock is offline  
Old Apr 12, 22, 7:08 am
  #26  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: LAX
Programs: AA EP, MUCCI, Proudly BA Blue,.
Posts: 843
Line cutters, scrum, and gate lice are about one thing - securing overhead bin space directly above their seat. All too often, people travel with more cabin baggage than they are allowed, and will do anything to serve themselves by taking advantage of the system in any way they can.
sushanna1 and WeekendTraveler like this.
matinicus rock is offline  
Old Apr 12, 22, 8:22 am
  #27  
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,070
Originally Posted by matinicus rock View Post
Line cutters, scrum, and gate lice are about one thing - securing overhead bin space directly above their seat. All too often, people travel with more cabin baggage than they are allowed, and will do anything to serve themselves by taking advantage of the system in any way they can.
I can't speak for others, but I generally carry just one bag. Occasionally I carry two, usually if I have more delicate stuff that I feel comfortable carrying without jostling. And when I do, it's one up top, one below. That said, often the reason why there is a lack of overhead space is because people buy lots of stuff in duty free or they don't know how to place stuff in the overhead bins. I've had to warn people as they start removing my backpack so they can put their stuff in (sloppily). If they were to put things in there properly, often there is sufficient space (or if they made use of the space in front of them... but that would be asking too much)
TPACjv likes this.
StuckInYYZ is offline  
Old Apr 12, 22, 8:31 am
  #28  
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 144
Originally Posted by hotelboy View Post
Does it really matter? Everyone on the plane arrives at the same time.
I used to think that way too , but not anymore. Today's flyers are ruder and pushier than ever. I'm 50+ at one time I believed in a kinder, gentler traveler. Anyone
tries to cut in front of me, I'll clothesline them! (haha--just kidding ,but it sounds good).

While it really doesn't matter, it does matter if you let yourself get disrespected. That is how I look at it.
TPACjv, strickerj, Spanish and 1 others like this.
RRROOO is offline  
Old Apr 12, 22, 8:37 am
  #29  
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: CMH
Programs: BA Gold, AA Plat, NK $9 fare club
Posts: 660
Originally Posted by matinicus rock View Post
There is nowhere better to witness a human’s misplaced sense of entitlement than at the gate of a departing flight. A modern day anthropologist should write a book about it - or better yet, a documentary with hidden cameras.
We most certainly have scientists on this forum. Perhaps a research project is in order!
TPACjv likes this.
Spanish is offline  
Old Apr 12, 22, 9:06 am
  #30  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: BOS
Programs: UA MM
Posts: 1,524
One that makes me chuckle is the person who tries to board early, is told by the GA that it is not yet his/her time, and then steps back a few feet, now in front of everyone else who has been waiting, to be able to cut everyone when that group is called. Not being willing to wait your turn is simply disrespectful and yes, fighting for the overhead bin space is a zero sum game.
TPACjv likes this.
MojaveFlyer is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread