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Hotels throttling down water flow in room bathrooms

Hotels throttling down water flow in room bathrooms

Old Jan 14, 20, 3:10 am
  #16  
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Originally Posted by backprop View Post
It's interesting. In hundreds of nights of travel over several years, I've never - not once - lacked the water pressure to 'comprehensively' rinse myself and my head of hair off in less than 30 seconds. I must be extremely lucky!
Same. I just get out and say to my husband "crap water flow" but it doesn't restrict me from washing my long hair and thoroughly rinsing all the shampoo and condition off before I get out.

Why is it every time I think of low flow I think of the Seinfeld hairdos because of the low flow!
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Old Jan 15, 20, 1:45 am
  #17  
 
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Having worked in luxury hotels for 20+ years, I think you will find that in many regions the bathroom water consumption for larger/branded hotels is a very small part of their utilities costs. The kitchens, plant equipment/back of house is where the biggest consumption is usually found.

In my experience, international hotels may use a device that comes with the bathroom fittings to keep water flow consistent. If the water flow is much lower than that it is usually either a infrastructure issue or someone has gone too far trying to control it.
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Old Jan 15, 20, 10:39 am
  #18  
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Originally Posted by nzed View Post
Having worked in luxury hotels for 20+ years, I think you will find that in many regions the bathroom water consumption for larger/branded hotels is a very small part of their utilities costs. The kitchens, plant equipment/back of house is where the biggest consumption is usually found.

In my experience, international hotels may use a device that comes with the bathroom fittings to keep water flow consistent. If the water flow is much lower than that it is usually either a infrastructure issue or someone has gone too far trying to control it.
Sure, at times. But it doesn't mean that hotels don’t go targeting guest room water consumption for financial reasons. They do that too.

Low flow bathroom features are the call of the day:

https://texaslodging.com/6-ways-to-r...ion-in-hotels/

And low-flow bathroom “features” are the cheap fruit of the day for hotel owners to get and eat at the expense of some guest experience:

.... they started reducing consumption by beginning with the "low hanging fruit." Installing inexpensive aerators in faucets and showers helped minimize water consumption significantly, as an example.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.wat...s%3fformat=amp

Originally Posted by Annalisa12 View Post
Originally Posted by backprop
It's interesting. In hundreds of nights of travel over several years, I've never - not once - lacked the water pressure to 'comprehensively' rinse myself and my head of hair off in less than 30 seconds. I must be extremely lucky!
Same. I just get out and say to my husband "crap water flow" but it doesn't restrict me from washing my long hair and thoroughly rinsing all the shampoo and condition off before I get out.

Why is it every time I think of low flow I think of the Seinfeld hairdos because of the low flow!
You can shampoo and conditioner your head/hair, possibly soap down parts of your body, and get it all washed out in 30 seconds with “crap water flow”? Why do I believe that your idea of a “crap water flow” is as different as our clocks.

Last edited by GUWonder; Jan 15, 20 at 12:05 pm
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Old Jan 15, 20, 11:29 am
  #19  
 
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In this day and age, restricting water flow might be a great sales argument if advertised properly.
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Old Jan 15, 20, 12:00 pm
  #20  
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Originally Posted by vanaema78 View Post
In this day and age, restricting water flow might be a great sales argument if advertised properly.
Suppliers of goods and services to hotels do just that and have it as part of sales pitches to hotels. And hotels marketing their greenwashing ways to customers already takes place and has had some customers take the bait, hook, line and sinker.

Home sellers and their agents often seem to prefer that the prospective buyers don’t get a lot of time to see how the water flow works in the home, and they hope for a quick inspection helping them to pass muster with prospective buyers. Hotels are probably counting on this same kind of thing from its hotel guests.
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Old Jan 15, 20, 3:32 pm
  #21  
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In my 1000's of room-nights, I don't think I've ever encountered a room where I couldn't take a good shower because of some sort of new water-flow restrictive device.

I've definitely stayed in hotels with crappy showers and low water pressure, but I don't believe I was a victim of some sort of grand water-restriction conspiracy. They were just crappy hotels.

If low-flow has hit the mainline business hotels I use often in North America and Europe, it has not affected my ability to shower. If a hotel can reduce water usage without affecting me, I don't have a problem with it. In some parts of the world, that might be a meaningful environmental benefit. In others, it probably doesn't matter beyond the hotel's bottom line.
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Old Jan 15, 20, 4:38 pm
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I have not noticed it myself, but if I was a hotel owner in my city, with our outrageous water rates, I think that is exactly what I would do. I would cut costs on water by using environmentally friendly fixtures. I would also try to get a tax credit for doing so.

The city might even have environmental initiatives placed on hotels to get them to cut back on water usage, either by penalties, or by incentives.

Either way, if I was a hotel owner, I would make full use of those fixtures as water costs are significant, and the majority of guests either don't seem to mind, or they put up with it.

I suppose its like leg room on planes, or paying to check bags. Its a revenue generator by the business, and either it works and it doesn't impact the number of guests, or it doesn't work and people leave your hotel in droves.

I personally have gone all in on low flow products. Shower heads, new toilets, water efficient dishwasher, water efficient washing machine. My water usage is absurdly low and my water bill is also pretty low. I have really not found a negative in doing so. But unfortunately, it impacts you more negatively. But I suppose its the nature of revenue management. I suppose you could fill the tub up with water and use a bucket, but I don't think that would be a very pleasant shower.
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Old Jan 15, 20, 6:04 pm
  #23  
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Originally Posted by pinniped View Post
In my 1000's of room-nights, I don't think I've ever encountered a room where I couldn't take a good shower because of some sort of new water-flow restrictive device.

I've definitely stayed in hotels with crappy showers and low water pressure, but I don't believe I was a victim of some sort of grand water-restriction conspiracy. They were just crappy hotels.

If low-flow has hit the mainline business hotels I use often in North America and Europe, it has not affected my ability to shower. If a hotel can reduce water usage without affecting me, I don't have a problem with it. In some parts of the world, that might be a meaningful environmental benefit. In others, it probably doesn't matter beyond the hotel's bottom line.
Check out the Hyatt ORD but come clean enough that you and the fam don’t need a major shower during your stay there. Many of the rooms there don’t have tubs.
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Old Jan 16, 20, 3:27 pm
  #24  
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I don't think I've ever used a standard bathtub in a hotel room. (That is, to fill it up and take a bath.) I'd prefer just a shower stall to be honest...depending on the tub height it can be awkward to step into and out of it to shower.
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Old Jan 16, 20, 3:39 pm
  #25  
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Originally Posted by pinniped View Post
I don't think I've ever used a standard bathtub in a hotel room. (That is, to fill it up and take a bath.) I'd prefer just a shower stall to be honest...depending on the tub height it can be awkward to step into and out of it to shower.
Stayed at a very new Hampton Inn last year and we were delighted to have a fairly-big shower stall instead of the usual small, shallow bath tub and clingy shower curtain.
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Old Jan 16, 20, 3:55 pm
  #26  
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Originally Posted by pinniped View Post
I don't think I've ever used a standard bathtub in a hotel room. (That is, to fill it up and take a bath.) I'd prefer just a shower stall to be honest...depending on the tub height it can be awkward to step into and out of it to shower.
I don’t care to use the bath tubs for baths most times — probably used them at a rate of less than once per thousand hotel nights — but I mentioned the tubs because pooling water in the tub may be some people’s means to a workaround for the very low water flow from shower heads and even faucets.

Hotels have been on a trend to remove bathtubs for reasons that are not limited to just reducing water usage and that trend has preceded the present wave of throttling water flow rates in hotel bathrooms.

Most hotel guests don’t take baths in the tub and just shower in the showers/tubs if they end up using the full-size bath towels in the room. I have to assume that a large segment of hotel guests shower once during the guest’s stay. This all means that tub removal/elimination affects fewer hotel guests and affects guests way less than the water throttling that prompted this thread.

Last edited by GUWonder; Jan 16, 20 at 4:03 pm
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Old Jan 16, 20, 9:16 pm
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'Throttling down' seems a most peculiar term in this context.

To me, throttling down means taking your foot off the gas.

But in this thread, hotels are being accused of buying new taps etc to reduce water flow.

Surely, if this is the case, hotels are applying the brakes rather than 'throttling down'!
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Old Jan 16, 20, 9:35 pm
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"The lady doth protest too much, methinks"
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Old Jan 16, 20, 9:36 pm
  #29  
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Originally Posted by cargueiro View Post
'Throttling down' seems a most peculiar term in this context.

To me, throttling down means taking your foot off the gas.

But in this thread, hotels are being accused of buying new taps etc to reduce water flow.

Surely, if this is the case, hotels are applying the brakes rather than 'throttling down'!
Would it make you happier to call it “choking down” the water flow with new tap and shower-head purchases? The terms can be rather synonymous in some contexts, including at least this one.

The customers’ shower experience in the hotel rooms has been considered pretty important even for hotel execs:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/trave...ls/2154259002/

Hotels big-brothering with room thermostats/temperatures seems to have been such a sensitive topic for some hotel apologists that some in hotel management even wanted to try to avoid discussing the issue:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/its-not...ged-1485371225

Is discussing the hotels’ big-brothering with the hotel room shower experience — an experience considered so critical historically that hotels have gone to great lengths to improve it — any different than the issue with hotel room temperatures/thermostats?

Last edited by GUWonder; Jan 16, 20 at 9:57 pm
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Old Jan 17, 20, 5:57 am
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
Would it make you happier to call it “choking down” the water flow with new tap and shower-head purchases? The terms can be rather synonymous in some contexts, including at least this one.
To be honest, I am not that keen on either term - 'choking down' or 'throttling down'. I prefer 'reducing water pressure'.

But it isn't that important. I just wasn't aware of these expressions...
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