Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > TravelBuzz
Reload this Page >

What are things you do when you travel that you are surprised others do not do?

What are things you do when you travel that you are surprised others do not do?

Old Apr 18, 18, 8:03 am
  #121  
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 987
Originally Posted by jybrick View Post
Sanitizing wipes for the tray tables. I don't know that I've ever seen anyone else actually doing it. Hasn't everyone seen pictures by now of what your fellow flyers are doing on these tables sometimes?
I've done it. Usually only during peak flu season. Not just the tables but also the arm rests. I'm usually fairly close to first in Group 2 so I do it immediately when I get to my seat.
Kensterfly is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 8:09 am
  #122  
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 987
Originally Posted by BenA View Post


Once you exceed about a week, itís time to do laundry rather than to pack more stuff. My wife and I went on an entire three week honeymoon with only a carryon, and it wasnít a problem at all. If youíre gone for that length of time, itís likely at least some of your accommodations will be apartment rentals they have laundry facilities (and if not, you should be able to find a laundromat with minimal effort).

And to preempt the next objection, we spent half the trip in Fiji and half in New Zealand - about as far apart at the time as climates could get. Careful layering is the name of the game for flexible packing. And if you donít get it right, itís usually easy to buy something extra at your destination - I will cop to buying a souvenir All Blacks jacket to cope with Windy Wellington

If you or someone you travel with is having trouble editing down the clothing selection, Iíd recommend ExOfficioís products. They arenít cheap, but unlike most travel outfitters many of their pieces are stealthy enough to cover you from daytime travel to nighttime dinner reservations without a problem. Choosing good footwear is important too - for ladies, in particu
lar, limiting to a max of 1-2 packed pairs that are versatile in addition to wearing your bulkiest on the plane is smart.
My bride and I do two week long European River Cruises with a 22 inch carry on and small tote each. And we don't do laundry. Enough Socks and underwear to change every day. Couple pairs of khakis and a few shirts. Accessories for her lets her mix it up for dinner every night. Everyone else on the ship does the same thing. No one notices, or cares, if you are seen wearing the same clothes more than once.

And we've never sailed without our luggage due to the airline losing it.
Kensterfly is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 8:10 am
  #123  
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,905
Originally Posted by jrl767 View Post
that becomes a static map (digital version of paper) ... it doesnít update in real time, which I think is what Annalisa12 was referring to
A digital version of paper except you can zoom in and out, and there is a dot showing you where you are and which direction you are facing.

Look, I love paper maps and often carry one with me when travelling, but an offline version of google maps (or any other digital mapping product) is very different, with different strengths and weaknesses.

Also, try carrying a map of London in your pocket! Another key difference.
threeoh is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 8:16 am
  #124  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Boulder
Programs: AA Plat, CX Silver
Posts: 2,347
Originally Posted by Kensterfly View Post


Surely people donít really change into pajamas on flights? What is this? A Pulman berth on a 1953 California Zephyr?
Many airlines hand out pajamas to first class passengers, so, yeah. I still have a set of JL pajamas that I sometimes wear around my apartment.
txflyer77 is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 8:32 am
  #125  
Moderator: UK and Ireland & Europe, and Carbon Conscious Travel
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Biggleswade
Programs: SK*G, Lots of Blue Elsewhere
Posts: 13,455
Originally Posted by threeoh View Post
Also, try carrying a map of London in your pocket! Another key difference.
See, I'm old enough (not that old) to remember when everybody living in London had one of these:

Amazon Amazon
stut is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 8:57 am
  #126  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 19
Originally Posted by nerd View Post
I am dumbstruck when people don't realize that maybe you built in 20 minutes for traffic/subway delays, 15 minutes for bag check delays, 30 minutes for TSA fustercluck, and an additional 10 minutes to get food b/c your 6pm flight has only pretzels, and yes -- this is why you might have arrived 2h prior.
Late to the party so maybe this was already mentioned, but OP talking about the "provided pajamas" on AA leads me to think he/she doesn't have the same concerns about only being served pretzels after 6 pm, or waiting in long bag check lines, because first class px don't experience such inconveniences. 😏
Zeeb likes this.
makasha21 is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 9:18 am
  #127  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Programs: M&M FTL (*Silver), KLM/AF blue
Posts: 275
Well Ryanair does do charge for printing boarding passes at the airport. About 30 USD...
Key8 is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 9:26 am
  #128  
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Programs: AAdvantage, Skymiles
Posts: 140
Originally Posted by jybrick View Post
Sanitizing wipes for the tray tables. I don't know that I've ever seen anyone else actually doing it. Hasn't everyone seen pictures by now of what your fellow flyers are doing on these tables sometimes?
I'm one of those that believes that as long as you're living within generally accepted conditions of Western civilization (fully cooked meats, no dead bodies left to rot on your front lawn, etc....), then the extra sanitizing doesn't help much, if at all.
ajGoes likes this.
mdkowals is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 9:47 am
  #129  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,808
Originally Posted by visalli View Post
I always prefer printed boarding passes.
Since I've been collecting all boardings since 1989, I prefer to have paper boarding, not digital.
In the case of boarding pass printed on thermal paper I make a copy in regular paper when I arrive at home and file together with the others.

This.

BP's on the phone only cause trouble because inevitably, someone forgets where it is, or has trouble calling it up, and then it won't scan etc etc and it holds up the line. If people used them properly, this would be less of a problem, but they never do.

Paper is easier. And it is not dependent on keeping the phone charged, entering a PIN or any of the other extra steps needed for this technology that supposedly makes things easier.
Disneymkvii likes this.
Proudelitist is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 9:50 am
  #130  
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 23
I'll chime in. I am surprised when i'm going to TSA Pre how many people are completely bewildered by the who situation and freeze like a deer in the headlights. These days I don't bother saying anything and just walk around them.
Disneymkvii is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 10:21 am
  #131  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Central Colorado
Programs: Delta, United, American, Norwegian, Southwest
Posts: 124
(8) Ok now a weird thing...when packing I usually just take shirts, pants, etc. on their hangers and fold them loosely into my suitcase in one big bundle. I don't take them off the hangers or fold them individually. When I arrive on the other end I just open my suitcase and everything is ready to hang up super easily. I find things don't get any more wrinkled than they do when folding individually, and I'm more likely to hang things up quickly upon my arrival (and I don't have to go hunting for hangers, etc.). Things too dirty to be worn again go in the suitcase off-hanger (but I keep the hanger around), so every place I stop I just re-create a mini version of my closet at home basically.

You may think it's weird but I've been doing this for many years.

My thing: Bring something to read. Totally amazed at people who will sit through even a short flight either (a) doing nothing, (b) engaging the person next to them in unwanted conversation, or (c) relying on IFE which may be broken or full of crap.
NotSoFrequentColorado is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 10:41 am
  #132  
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: VPS
Programs: IHG Spire, Delta Silver
Posts: 4,044
I am willing to say "Hi, I'm clueless. What do I need to know about...?" rather than trying to bluff my way through a situation with uncertain decision trees.

Lots of times, there's an assumption in travel that everyone else there is a road warrior or has at least done This enough times to know exactly what you're supposed to do and what expectations are. Plenty of interactions go a lot smoother when the other person learns you're coming from a position of ignorance on how to operate a subway fare card reader or go through immigration in an unfamiliar place or what's expected as a different security checkpoint instead of assuming you're a 'the rules don't apply to me' kind of person.

For international flights- try to make a toilet stop between getting off the plane and hitting an immigration line. You may not have to really go yet, but better to empty things out as much as possible before the point of much standing and waiting.
beachmouse is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 11:31 am
  #133  
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,905
Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
For international flights- try to make a toilet stop between getting off the plane and hitting an immigration line. You may not have to really go yet, but better to empty things out as much as possible before the point of much standing and waiting.
I'm the opposite. I try to go before landing so I don't get stuck behind an entire 777 worth of passengers. I'm a fast walker and even in Y I can usually overtake much of the plane on my way to the immigration line (assuming an airport with a long walk to immigration). If I stop to go to the bathroom, that guarantees that 80-90% of the plane (could be 200-300 people) will be in front of me.
threeoh is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 11:59 am
  #134  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 19
Originally Posted by hinsopa View Post
Next week will be my first time going thru precheck and I have researched it. I purchased this primarily because I have a disablility and felt bad taking moretime. What kind of things are are you referring to when you say people are unprepared?
Some people seem to have no clue that they will need their ID and boarding pass when entering the TSA checkpoint, nor that they'll need to empty their pockets of change, phones, metal objects once they reach the conveyor and detector. There's generally plenty of time while waiting in line to consolidate one's belongings in a purse or carry on rather than spending 2 minutes at the far end of the bin area scrambling and dropping things, and holding up those behind you who are ready to breeze through. Exceptions for those who don't travel often at all, (and I'm not excusing those who are rude to infrequent travelers, there's no call for that), but people should at least glance up from their personal bubble to observe what those ahead of them in line are doing in preparation.
makasha21 is offline  
Old Apr 18, 18, 12:02 pm
  #135  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 19
Originally Posted by darthbimmer View Post
That's something I wonder about when I travel overseas. "Stand right, walk left" makes sense in the US because it's the same as our driving etiquette-- slower traffic keep right, pass to the left. Obviously in countries where driving is done on the left rather than right side of the road, driving etiquette is the reverse. But is walking etiquette also reversed? My experience in some driving-on-the-left countries has been that pedestrians still use stand-right etiquette.
It doesn't really matter much either way as long as those walking are fluid enough to move left or right, and those standing aren't totally blocking the entire walkway with their belongings or their companion(s). 😁😁
makasha21 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: