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What are things you do when you travel that you are surprised others do not do?

What are things you do when you travel that you are surprised others do not do?

Old Apr 9, 18, 10:56 am
  #31  
 
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Originally Posted by jrl767 View Post

and if your phone inexplicable disappears or dies? paper BP is a pretty good backup
Because boarding pass can't go missing?? This is just technophobia. You can just go to the gate agent and ask them to reprint your boarding pass...not so difficult.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 11:14 am
  #32  
 
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I get the appeal of the mobile boarding pass, but I save all my BPs, so I like a printed copy. Never check bags unless it can't be avoided (traveling with athletic equipment for example).
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Old Apr 9, 18, 11:45 am
  #33  
 
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Originally Posted by PAX_fips View Post
I stopped doing the ...-thing -- which so many, also in here at FT, do.
It's people, some maybe on their first flight ever or just on holiday crazee, or the entitled ones pushing others around?
Many levels where I was feeling dumbstruck.

Chill out! Unless actual harm (physically) could be at stake, I will just come along.

Relaxed travels.

Agreed. Go with the flow and adapt as necessary.



Originally Posted by jrl767 View Post

and if your phone inexplicable disappears or dies? paper BP is a pretty good backup
I like to keep one on my phone, but also have a paper backup. Either from a printout, or from an agent.


Originally Posted by Offshore171 View Post
1. When booking a multi sector long haul, pay close attention to the layover times for each option. Sometimes the booking engines serve up options that are crazy tight, even if they are technically legal. Eg, 70 minutes at Dubai or 65 at Heathrow.

No way I'll take one of those, your contingency is gone. Give me a 2.5 hour layover.
Same here. I'd rather spend an extra hour or two and play it safe, than to risk a miss and waste much more time. Even on the odd chance you make it most of the time, still not worth it to me either.



Originally Posted by CPRich View Post
Deadbolt/chain/latch my hotel door so I don't have to post a "walked in on naked" thread.
This for sure.


Originally Posted by CPRich View Post
Realize the "remove your belts, remove your watches" isn't really needed, at least for what I've worn through security hundreds of times.
Definitely. I grabbed a belt that's got a carbon fiber buckle and no metal at all. Use it all the time, and never have to take it off.



Originally Posted by CPRich View Post
Move to the right, with my bag in front of or behind me so others can walk up the escalator if needed.
Stand right, walk left.
Definitely this.

Last edited by thunderlounge; Apr 9, 18 at 4:24 pm
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Old Apr 9, 18, 11:52 am
  #34  
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Originally Posted by jspira View Post
This random thought crossed my mind

In my case, since I never check bags, I am often shocked when I travel with someone who checks a bag (yes, I admit I simply should be more selective about travel mates). I always have some kind of lounge/sleepwear for bedtime in case the pajamas provided aren't terribly nice (and I'm really shocked when some people say how nice they are, an example being the original AA pajamas), and unless there's a lounge that I really want to spend time in, I tend to arrive at the airport pretty close to departure time (and am dumbstruck when people tell me they are arriving two or three hours prior).

Good that you note it was a 'random thought' rather than a 'thought out before posting' thought. LOL

Obviously as another poster has noted, how you perceive something always depends on the individual and their circumstances, etc. I can't say anything I encounter when travelling actually 'shocks' me. That's a pretty strong word to use. There are things I notice other people doing or not doing when I travel but none of it even surprises me never mind shocking me. Some of the things I notice do sometimes amuse me though.

Since I chose to no longer need to work for a living, I notice how so many people are in a rush in every possible way. Caught up in the Rat Race and so sure that their 'need' to rush should trump anyone's lack of such a need. I stroll through the airport, on the walkways, down the aisle of the plane, etc. I have plenty of time to check a bag and retrieve it at leisure. I don't have to concern myself with having some disallowed item in my carry-on, everything is checked except my documents, a book to read, etc. I can arrive at the airport early or not as it suits me, I live to no schedule other than my own wishes.

If you just take a minute in any busy airport to just stand and watch the people, you will see how fast they are moving. Why? Instead of being surprised by people who check bags, you might want to consider why you don't have time to check bags.

If anything actually surprises me in what I see others doing, I suppose it is how few seem to realize that "the mass of men live lives of quiet desperation" as Thoreau wrote. I always remember an acquaintance who once said to me over lunch, that he was 'so busy living the life, he had no time to live life.' It might be worth thinking about.

You might find this article provides some food for thought in that regard. https://www.artofmanliness.com/2017/...t-desperation/
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Old Apr 9, 18, 12:03 pm
  #35  
 
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Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post
If you just take a minute in any busy airport to just stand and watch the people, you will see how fast they are moving. Why? Instead of being surprised by people who check bags, you might want to consider why you don't have time to check bags.
I walk fast in airports because I like the exercise and it helps me sleep better afterwards. (My 70+ long retired mother likes to power walk terminals even faster) It's also good to get in as much gentle movement as possible before long haul flights to reduce the risk of blood clots and other health concerns.

Why don't people who have the time between flights walk more given the health benefits? Seems like there are times when I have the rainforest tunnel or 'history of Georgia' murals at ATL almost to myself.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 12:38 pm
  #36  
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Maybe I'm weird but I'm one of those people who normally goes to the bathroom during boarding.

At somewhere like JFK (my home airport) I don't know how long it'll be from pushback until I'm in the air and able to go. Given I'm usually in F I'll head up once boarding has finished, or the stream of boarding is light. I've had several occasions where it's been more than 2hrs from pushback to being in the air just due to it being early evening rush hour so I'll go as late as possible.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 1:27 pm
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Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
I walk fast in airports because I like the exercise and it helps me sleep better afterwards. (My 70+ long retired mother likes to power walk terminals even faster) It's also good to get in as much gentle movement as possible before long haul flights to reduce the risk of blood clots and other health concerns.

Why don't people who have the time between flights walk more given the health benefits? Seems like there are times when I have the rainforest tunnel or 'history of Georgia' murals at ATL almost to myself.
I feel the same way about walking quickly in airports (and elsewhere). As long as I'm not running into other people, pushing them out of the way, or cutting into their path, I really don't see why other people should have a problem with it.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 2:27 pm
  #38  
 
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Originally Posted by CPRich View Post
Realize the "remove your belts, remove your watches" isn't really needed, at least for what I've worn through security hundreds of times.
I have only ever removed a watch when asked by security. When I've worn it through, I've always been fine. But one of my belts always sets off metal detectors, even though the buckle can't be more metal than a watch. Just a weird thing.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 2:33 pm
  #39  
 
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Surprised how few people have their own luggage tag with their flight details on their checked baggage.

Given that airline luggage tags come adrift now and again, therefore leading to missing luggage, it can make the difference between the airline printing you a new tag and your luggage accompanying you on the plane; or ending stuck in a corner of the baggage handling shed.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 2:56 pm
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Conversely, things I do that other people don't get:

Get to the airport very early - and I mean crazy early, as in 4 hours. Yes, I spend a lot of time sitting around (usually in lounges eating free food and drinking free coffee/beer, etc.), but a million miles and I've never missed a flight.

Book 23-hour layovers. A taste of another city for the price of an airport hotel. The flight is usually no more expensive with sub-24hr layovers - I find this a great way to extend my travelling experience.

Carry cash - and I mean 4-figure sums - in at least 2, preferably 3 hard currencies. I actually use cash as little as I possibly can (no points or miles), but I feel a lot better having it with me, knowing that if the brown stuff really starts flying I can dump a few hundred bucks on a hotel counter or even a couple of grand on an airline counter if I really have to. You never know when credit cards are going to get hacked, etc.

Now the big one, that I expect some debate on:

Fly economy class. I could afford business or even first class if I really wanted to, but I feel I can get much better value on the ground. I have flown long haul business before (never actually paid for it) and I have to say I wasn't impressed enough to fork out thousands that I feel could be better employed by staying longer at my destination or taking another trip later.

I am breaking this rule later this year and flying UK-USA-UK in first at a greatly reduced price (2,300GBP MAN-LHR-ORD//MIA-LHR-MAN) as a matter of curiosity, to see if F actually makes the difference and if it's worth blowing my stack of miles on. I don't think it will spoil me - I've already booked a long haul Y flight for 2 months after my F flight.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 3:10 pm
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Originally Posted by Giggleswick View Post
I feel the same way about walking quickly in airports (and elsewhere). As long as I'm not running into other people, pushing them out of the way, or cutting into their path, I really don't see why other people should have a problem with it.
Same here, which is why I also second the point that was made on situational awareness. On some days I really wish I had a speaker on me that would play "Excuses me" in an endless loop. I respect that people want to move more slowly than I do, but on the other hand don't see any reason why they should prevent others from moving faster where possible. It's give and take. (Unless people are in a wheel chair or a less able to move - I would always respect that.)
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Old Apr 9, 18, 3:56 pm
  #42  
 
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Originally Posted by The_Bouncer View Post
Conversely, things I do that other people don't get:

Get to the airport very early - and I mean crazy early, as in 4 hours. Yes, I spend a lot of time sitting around (usually in lounges eating free food and drinking free coffee/beer, etc.), but a million miles and I've never missed a flight.

Book 23-hour layovers. A taste of another city for the price of an airport hotel. The flight is usually no more expensive with sub-24hr layovers - I find this a great way to extend my travelling experience.

Carry cash - and I mean 4-figure sums - in at least 2, preferably 3 hard currencies.
1. Early arrival - I'll go for two to three hours early, 4 just seems like an incremental increase to me. Not odd at all to me.
2. Overnight layovers - I love these and book whenever the opportunity arises. For exactly your reasons.
3. I have an ATM accessible no fee, no currency exchange fee account that I use only for international travel. Before leaving, I load that account with the appropriate amount - more than I need, but not so much that I'd be anywhere near penniless if I lost the card and had that account drained. I also carry maybe a couple of hundred dollars in US currency (which I've never had to use except when I return to the US).

I'm going to leave the whole class of travel for others, because even though I fly l/h premium - often paid for - I can't really argue with your approach. I can go 5, maybe 6, hours in steerage. And using your exact logic, that's what I do.
But more than that and I'm just dealing with back problems when I arrive.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 4:14 pm
  #43  
 
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Originally Posted by mikew99 View Post
I'm surprised that so many people don't print out their boarding passes on paper. (At least, this is my assumption based on how many people scan their phone to board.)

I always go to great lengths to check in for my flight in advance and have a paper boarding pass to show. Among other things, this avoids having to maneuver an app on an expensive, battery-powered device with carry-on bags in tow. And unlike my phone, if I drop it, ruin it, or lose it, it's no big deal.

FWIW, I also print out my hotel and transportation confirmations for my entire trip, but I consider my boarding pass to be far more important to print out than any of those.
Absolute opposite. Everything is on the phone. More convenient, everything in one place and it's always in my pocket. Theoretically, if I were to lose the phone or the battery die it's super easy to get a new BP, but those two things are pretty much never an issue for me.

Also for others who talked about early arrival. That's gonna be a no for me dawg, unless it's international travel.
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Last edited by adunker; Apr 9, 18 at 5:02 pm
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Old Apr 9, 18, 6:59 pm
  #44  
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Originally Posted by jspira View Post
This random thought crossed my mind

<snip> unless there's a lounge that I really want to spend time in, I tend to arrive at the airport pretty close to departure time (and am dumbstruck when people tell me they are arriving two or three hours prior).
We frequently make the drive from San Diego to LAX for international flights, since it's more practical to catch a flight from LAX than it is to drive to SAN and get a connecting flight to LA. If you don't build in a 2-3 hour "what if there's traffic on the freeway" buffer, you may well miss your flight. I left with 4 spare hours on a recent flight, and the traffic was so horrendous that it took 4 hours instead of 2. I made it with time to spare. I find rushing and near misses too stressful. It's easier to plan ahead for the worst, and, if it happens, it's no big deal. It also gives me a chance to count my blessings... all those poor people who have to commute on the freeway. I feel for them.
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Old Apr 9, 18, 7:14 pm
  #45  
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Originally Posted by dulciusexasperis View Post
If you just take a minute in any busy airport to just stand and watch the people, you will see how fast they are moving. Why? Instead of being surprised by people who check bags, you might want to consider why you don't have time to check bags.
Some of us tend to walk fast even if we aren't in a hurry.
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