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Travel for the over 60 gang

Travel for the over 60 gang

Old Jan 5, 18, 12:42 pm
  #16  
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I apologize if I offended anyone relating my own disability to my age. Since I had polio at age 3 months, I am well aware of the limitations at all ages. I was trying to be somewhat specific in listing my physical difficulties an example, but that is not all the issues I deal with. I have found the women’s forum helpful (since writing this post) and also felt that good info could be found in a place for those my age. This site has been my “go to” source for learning and finding excellent recommendations. The only issue I have struggled with is that sometimes issues reach across lines and it’s hard to know where to start. I, frankly, fine it a bit intimidating.
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Old Jan 5, 18, 7:55 pm
  #17  
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My wife has never been one for a long day and it's become more so as she gets older but other than that it's not an issue at all. Trying to think of something we would have done 20 years ago but not now I'm drawing a blank. She joined the Medicare crowd some years back.
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Old Jan 5, 18, 11:33 pm
  #18  
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While I agree we likely don’t need a “ seniors” forum

There’s things I think about as an older person I wouldn’t of thought about 20 years ago. This place is I probably won’t visit now – places that but have to get a lot of inoculations, or the risk of disease is just too great.
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Old Jan 6, 18, 11:21 pm
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The biggest issue will probably be travel insurance. It starts becoming more expensive at about 70+ and prohibitive at some stage in the early 80s.
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Old Jan 7, 18, 2:40 pm
  #20  
 
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Originally Posted by squeakr View Post
There’s things I think about as an older person I wouldn’t of thought about 20 years ago. This place is I probably won’t visit now – places that but have to get a lot of inoculations, or the risk of disease is just too great.
We also now pay attention to distance/time to real medical care.

Unfortunately, "now" is the time we have the means for some of the more exotic travel.

We did have a medical emergency on a cruise ship a few years ago, and we were mighty impressed with the care. All ended well, thank goodness.
Fortunately, we were already docked. So as things seemed to be getting worse rather than better (it wasn't immediately obvious if this was really potentially life-threatening), just as I was about to suggest calling an ambulance, the doctor announced that he had just called for one.
The ER said that the ship medical team had "done everything we would have done, so we'll just keep him for observation for a while"; they gave us extra supplies of some of the meds used. Our specialists back home at a major teaching medical center said "that's exactly what we'd have done here", with a nod of approval.

However... that really did give us pause.
What if it had been more serious?
What if the doctor/team hadn't been quite so competent; there was no backup, no one else to "consult".

Obviously, if something really acute and immediately life-threatening occurs, well.... Life happens. Death happens.
But we aren't camping out in the ER waiting room for the rest of our lives.
(Maybe someday there will be *real* Virtual Reality, but until then... )

But will we take that cruise to Antarctica, where even evacuation is going to take a lot longer, even to get started?
That's a discussion we are having, and there are a few other dream trips with similar considerations.

The other thing is that we waited until later in life to start those dream trips.
There are some things we can't easily do now, or can't do at all. We are sorry we waited, very sorry. We are trying to catch up

And our regular meds and backup/emergency meds now just take up space.

Originally Posted by lhrsfo View Post
The biggest issue will probably be travel insurance. It starts becoming more expensive at about 70+ and prohibitive at some stage in the early 80s.
​​​​​
As for the cost of travel insurance going up with age, as long as we can *get* the right policies, we'll just include that in the total trip cost, within reason, of course.
(The one we worry about just slightly is MedJetAssist. They don't just increase rates, but at 75, they require modest medical underwriting. We think at this point it would be surprising if they gave us a "no", but if it did, that would affect our destinations. Our regular travel insurance will write the policy if one is "able to travel" on the day the policy is started. And we've had some claims, and know that they pay.)

GC
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Old Jan 7, 18, 9:12 pm
  #21  
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Originally Posted by GeezerCouple View Post
But will we take that cruise to Antarctica, where even evacuation is going to take a lot longer, even to get started?
You also may want to think about the cost of a cruise to Antarctica, versus seeing similar stuff elsewhere for a lot cheaper.

You can find plenty of icebergs and such in coastal Canada, Greenland, etc, not to mention on glacier lakes in Alaska, etc. All way easier and cheaper to get to than Antarctica if you're based in the USA.

And the majority of penguin locations in the world have no ice: Penguins are found in South Africa, Argentina (way up the coast from the cold tip), and Peru (not that far from the equator!), among other non-Antarctican places. (Last year I saw penguins near Cape Town and a family of lions blocking my road in Kruger NP on the same trip. This year I'm planning to see penguins a couple hours south of Lima and Machu Pichu on the same tirp. What can you see on the same Antartica cruise trip besides ice and penguins and stormy seas tossing your boat around?)

I mean, another issue facing older people is the lack of "new" money coming in the way it used to. So conserving money while traveling (so you can do more travels rather than using up that money on fewer travels) may be more important once you're retired than when you're steadily working. What you have in trade is time, so things that take more time but cost less money are more practical. But Antarctica cruises are expensive even when short!

Last edited by sdsearch; Jan 7, 18 at 9:21 pm
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Old Jan 7, 18, 10:32 pm
  #22  
 
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Originally Posted by sdsearch View Post
You also may want to think about the cost of a cruise to Antarctica, versus seeing similar stuff elsewhere for a lot cheaper.

You can find plenty of icebergs and such in coastal Canada, Greenland, etc, not to mention on glacier lakes in Alaska, etc. All way easier and cheaper to get to than Antarctica if you're based in the USA.

And the majority of penguin locations in the world have no ice: Penguins are found in South Africa, Argentina (way up the coast from the cold tip), and Peru (not that far from the equator!), among other non-Antarctican places. (Last year I saw penguins near Cape Town and a family of lions blocking my road in Kruger NP on the same trip. This year I'm planning to see penguins a couple hours south of Lima and Machu Pichu on the same tirp. What can you see on the same Antartica cruise trip besides ice and penguins and stormy seas tossing your boat around?)

I mean, another issue facing older people is the lack of "new" money coming in the way it used to. So conserving money while traveling (so you can do more travels rather than using up that money on fewer travels) may be more important once you're retired than when you're steadily working. What you have in trade is time, so things that take more time but cost less money are more practical. But Antarctica cruises are expensive even when short!
Really?

I'm not sure if you are among "older people" yet, but as someone approaching that category all too quickly (and we'd be considered by many to long be members), I can assure you that what clearly seems to be in short supply is *time*, and especially time when we can travel comfortably and *do* things. Already, there are restrictions due to health concerns.

Let us worry about whether money is in any short supply for our travels, or other choices, and also *where* we are hoping to travel. As already mentioned above, now is when we *do* have the means for this travel.

What we actually do NOT have "in trade is time", as you phrased it.
Time is what is in increasingly short supply. Healthy, active time? Even shorter supply. Some level of that is already in the past... and gone...

GC
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Old Jan 7, 18, 10:40 pm
  #23  
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Originally Posted by sdsearch View Post
You also may want to think about the cost of a cruise to Antarctica, versus seeing similar stuff elsewhere for a lot cheaper.
here’s an upcoming event unique to Antarctica
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Old Jan 8, 18, 8:53 am
  #24  
 
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Originally Posted by jrl767 View Post
here’s an upcoming event unique to Antarctica
Thanks for this link.

We've been interested in eclipses (in many unusual natural phenomena, actually).

We'll be watching to see if other cruise lines pick up on this, as schedules get set.

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Old Jan 8, 18, 4:10 pm
  #25  
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Originally Posted by jrl767 View Post
here’s an upcoming event unique to Antarctica
Well, a total solar eclipse is not unique to Antarctica. Only that particular one is.

There's another total solar eclipse sooner, much easier to get to: July 2, 2019 in parts of Chile and Argentina. In fact, that's an even more unique total solar eclipse IMHO, since (in parts of Argentina) it occurs close enough to sunset that the whole transition (before and after the totality) is safe to watch (without staring continuously, of course) without filter glasses and safe to photograph without any special lens filters.

Of course, as with any eclipse, neither of these are guaranteed to see it. The weather might or might not be favorable. (At the 2012 annular eclipse at sunset, I was a dozenish miles south of Lubbock TX where I at least got peeks of the "ring of fire" between the clouds, while everyone gathered at the official Lubbock viewing location was clouded out completely. So even small amounts of distance can sometimes make a big difference in viewability. But I doubt the boat near Antarctica has that much ability to run around looking for breaks in the clouds at eclipse time.)

Last edited by sdsearch; Jan 8, 18 at 4:22 pm
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Old Jan 8, 18, 4:15 pm
  #26  
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Originally Posted by GeezerCouple View Post
Really?

I'm not sure if you are among "older people" yet, but as someone approaching that category all too quickly (and we'd be considered by many to long be members), I can assure you that what clearly seems to be in short supply is *time*, and especially time when we can travel comfortably and *do* things. Already, there are restrictions due to health concerns.

Let us worry about whether money is in any short supply for our travels, or other choices, and also *where* we are hoping to travel. As already mentioned above, now is when we *do* have the means for this travel.

What we actually do NOT have "in trade is time", as you phrased it.
Time is what is in increasingly short supply. Healthy, active time? Even shorter supply. Some level of that is already in the past... and gone...

GC
I meant more time per year, not more time per lifetime.

Ie, I, like many people, am restricted (by my employer) to a few weeks of travel (ie, time off from work) a year (not counting weekend travel). Once someone retires, they no longer have that restriction.

I can't travel two months of the year right now no matter how cheap that travel or how much money I have to spend, while employed. (My employer won't let me take extra time off without pay.) The moment I retire, assuming I'm still healthy/etc enough by then, I'll be able to spend many months of the year traveling, but only if I can afford it.

Of course, this only applies to people who have to work full-time before they retire, and have limits on how much time they can take off per year. Obviously, some types of self-employed work don't have such restrictions even while you are working, and for those people the "extra" time available for travel per year in retirement might not be as big of a change.

Last edited by sdsearch; Jan 8, 18 at 4:26 pm
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Old Jan 11, 18, 9:51 am
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Originally Posted by hinsopa View Post
I plan to travel to London and am very excited. I was just feeling a bit confused as to where to start.
The Transport For London website has very helpful information about accessibility - I travel there frequently and try to avoid steps, so I stumbled on it one day while trying to determine if a particular station had a lot of stairs: https://tfl.gov.uk/transport-accessi...voiding-stairs
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Old Jan 11, 18, 7:30 pm
  #28  
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Thank you , Shoparound, that’s just what I needed.
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Old Jan 12, 18, 11:58 am
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Overseas Medical insurance

My friend and I are doing a Tokyo and Shanghai Disney trip in March. We are both 58 (So close enough to 60), she has coverage worldwide thru Blue Cross, I am under the VA, so no coverage other than related to my service connected disability. My biggest concern is what they count for pre-existing conditions. No problem if I am hit by a truck, but what if my arthritic knee that I had an xray for last month flares up and I can't walk, would that be rejected? Most have a 180 day to 2 year lookback period. Anyone have experience with this?​​​​​ Not worried about trip interruption as that would be covered under the different cards I used for the taxes and bookings. As a side note, with miles and points, I have booked 3 airlines and 4 hotels over 2 weeks with a retail of $11403 for a total out of pocket of $84.02 in taxes!! And people think I am crazy for all the mile stuff I do!!

Cheers!
JudyJFLA

Last edited by JudyJFLA; Jan 12, 18 at 12:28 pm
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