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not a single passenger death on a commercial JET aircraft anywhere in 2017 (?)

not a single passenger death on a commercial JET aircraft anywhere in 2017 (?)

Old Jan 1, 18, 3:13 pm
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not a single passenger death on a commercial JET aircraft anywhere in 2017 (?)

Saw on Twitter "not a single passenger death on a commercial JET aircraft anywhere on earth in 2017"

(I'm assuming that the poster means due to accidents, and not other causes)

is this true? If so, that's awesome.

* adding that the I believe the last major accident on a US airline was in 2001, 17 yrs ago, which I think is a great record for safety *
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Old Jan 1, 18, 3:20 pm
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Originally Posted by closetasfan View Post
Saw on Twitter "not a single passenger death on a commercial JET aircraft anywhere on earth in 2017"

(I'm assuming that the poster means due to accidents, and not other causes)

is this true? If so, that's awesome.

* adding that the I believe the last major accident on a US airline was in 2001, 17 yrs ago, which I think is a great record for safety *

Colgan 3407 in 2009. Maybe not a pure "jet" but 50 fatalities none the less.
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Old Jan 1, 18, 3:35 pm
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Originally Posted by tinkicker View Post
Colgan 3407 in 2009. Maybe not a pure "jet" but 50 fatalities none the less.
Not a jet at all. It's a prop plane.
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Old Jan 1, 18, 4:08 pm
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Originally Posted by txflyer77 View Post
Not a jet at all. It's a prop plane.
Propellers do not necessarily mean the plane lacks a jet engine. The Dash 8 that was involved in that incident is in fact a turboprop, with jet engines driving propellers.

Presumably the OP saw a reference to articles such as this:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a...-idUSKBN1EQ17L
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Old Jan 1, 18, 5:44 pm
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news.aviation-safety.net/2017/12/30/preliminary-asn-data-show-2017-safest-year-aviation-history/
five were passenger flights
aviation-safety.net/database/hpbarometer_gallery.php?year=2017
docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1SDp7p1y6m7N5xD5_fpOkYOrJvd68V7iy6etXy2cetb8/
to70.com/to70s-civil-aviation-safety-review-2017/
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Old Jan 2, 18, 8:50 am
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Originally Posted by txflyer77 View Post
Not a jet at all. It's a prop plane.
You'll have to argue that with the Aviation Safety Network, as they state
The United States last recorded a fatal airline passenger jet crash in February 2009, when Colgan Air Flight 3407 crashed
It is powered by a combustion turbine engine. The devices moving the air just happen to be in open air vs. contained in the nacelle as with a turbofan. I don't think there are any commercial "pure" turbojet engine-powered aircraft around, but I may be mistaken.
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Old Jan 2, 18, 9:24 am
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The stat, upon which this the original post is based, clearly excludes turboprop flights.
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Old Jan 2, 18, 9:57 am
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Originally Posted by Kagehitokiri View Post
news.aviation-safety.net/2017/12/30/preliminary-asn-data-show-2017-safest-year-aviation-history/

aviation-safety.net/database/hpbarometer_gallery.php?year=2017
docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1SDp7p1y6m7N5xD5_fpOkYOrJvd68V7iy6etXy2cetb8/
to70.com/to70s-civil-aviation-safety-review-2017/
From the ASN links above, taking into account turboprops as well, there were 10 fatal accidents (half on cargo flights, half on passenger flights). Two in the US, one in Canada, rest in various other countries. One was a 747 cargo flight. Several Cessna Grand Caravans (popular for small cargo). ATR-42 and a Shorts 330. Plus some others.

Aviation Safety Network > Database > Fatal airliner accidents 2017

http://news.aviation-safety.net/2017...ation-history/
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Old Jan 2, 18, 9:59 am
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Originally Posted by closetasfan View Post
Saw on Twitter "not a single passenger death on a commercial JET aircraft anywhere on earth in 2017"

(I'm assuming that the poster means due to accidents, and not other causes)

is this true? If so, that's awesome.

* adding that the I believe the last major accident on a US airline was in 2001, 17 yrs ago, which I think is a great record for safety *

Well there was a Turkish 747 crash that killed 39 but it was a cargo plane. Most of the 39 were on the ground but the rest were crew. I would call cargo "commercial" because..well, commerce. And of course, it was run by a commercial airline:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkis...es_Flight_6491
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Old Jan 2, 18, 10:17 am
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Originally Posted by Proudelitist View Post
Well there was a Turkish 747 crash that killed 39 but it was a cargo plane. Most of the 39 were on the ground but the rest were crew. I would call cargo "commercial" because..well, commerce. And of course, it was run by a commercial airline:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkis...es_Flight_6491
The statement is no PASSENGER deaths. The cargo aircraft don't have passengers.
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Old Jan 2, 18, 10:37 am
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Originally Posted by LarryJ View Post
The statement is no PASSENGER deaths. The cargo aircraft don't have passengers.
Even if you include them you come to the same conclusion: Aviation is extremely safe. The 39 dead in the 747F crash, the passenger that perished in the West wind crash and the numerous people that died in GA incidents during 2017 are dwarfed by the number of people dying in car accidents in a large city each year.
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Old Jan 2, 18, 12:49 pm
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Meh...that's a headline in search of a news story. (ie, clickbait)
It's factually accurate to say 2017 was the safest year on record for airline passenger service...which is what ASN stated in their study. Nothing more.
I've met Harro Ranter (he runs ASN), and he's a level-headed, factual guy. (He's Dutch, after all!).
While flattered with being noticed by the POTUS, I'm sure he's pulling his hair out with all the inquiries stacking up in his inbox. (ASN is a two-person operation).

The fact is, traveling above 5 miles per hour and/or 5 feet above the ground brings with it the risk of injury or death.
The amount of effort, money, time, money, and more money to safely operate an airline is staggering.
But after Trump's tweet, the topic immediately becomes political and polarized...and pointless.
The left starts churning the stats to prove Trump wrong; the right churns the stats to prove the left wrong.
Pointless.

Fly safely, folks.
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Old Jan 2, 18, 1:14 pm
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Originally Posted by airmotive View Post
Meh...that's a headline in search of a news story. (ie, clickbait)
It's factually accurate to say 2017 was the safest year on record for airline passenger service...which is what ASN stated in their study. Nothing more.
I've met Harro Ranter (he runs ASN), and he's a level-headed, factual guy. (He's Dutch, after all!).
While flattered with being noticed by the POTUS, I'm sure he's pulling his hair out with all the inquiries stacking up in his inbox. (ASN is a two-person operation).

The fact is, traveling above 5 miles per hour and/or 5 feet above the ground brings with it the risk of injury or death.
The amount of effort, money, time, money, and more money to safely operate an airline is staggering.
But after Trump's tweet, the topic immediately becomes political and polarized...and pointless.
The left starts churning the stats to prove Trump wrong; the right churns the stats to prove the left wrong.
Pointless.

Fly safely, folks.
I think the question after Trump took credit for air safety in 2017 is whether he credits Obama with flight safety for the 8 previous years. It's not really political. It's a character issue. Taking credit for things you don't deserve credit for and hypocritically withholding the same consideration for someone else. That's not R or D. It's childish.
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Old Jan 2, 18, 10:15 pm
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Originally Posted by LarryJ View Post
The statement is no PASSENGER deaths. The cargo aircraft don't have passengers.
Believe me, at the time of impact, the crew were nothing but passengers along for the ride.
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Old Jan 2, 18, 11:48 pm
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Originally Posted by LarryJ View Post
The stat, upon which this the original post is based, clearly excludes turboprop flights.
This is FT. Don't let facts get in the way of a pedantry.
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