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Do you "dress up" to fly premium cabin?

Do you "dress up" to fly premium cabin?

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Old Feb 14, 16, 8:25 am
  #91  
 
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Originally Posted by wendyg View Post
I grew up in a time when girls had to wear skirts to school and people dressed up to go to the theater, out to dinner, or even, in my mother's case to go into "the city" (ie, Manhattan). When I was 10 or 11, it occurred to me that people who live in Manhattan probably didn't dress up just to be there, and since I was sitting next to a kid who lived there, I asked her. No, she said, of course not. That's when I began to jettison the notion of dressing up to go places. By the time I was 16 I was going to the theater and nice restaurants in jeans, like many others around me. My attitude now, so many years later, is that a place that imposes a dress code is not somewhere I want to spend my time. It strikes me as anti-democratic.

I would far rather the people around me on a plane - especially in economy, where you're squashed so closely together - were comfortable and relaxed than trying to impress other people with how they look. They're likely to be much pleasanter that way.

wg
Some of us like the way we look in formal clothes. I bought some custom suits in grad school a few years ago. I rarely use them because now, everyone has gone casual and I rarely see people in suits.

I don't mind so much seeing casual clothes, but I don't want to see someone's thong or butt crack.

You don't have to be rich to dress nicely. Almost anyone can afford a nice pair of slacks and a dress shirt.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 8:30 am
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Dressing for flights

This author makes some interesting points about dressing on flights at
http://www.businessinsider.com/why-y...a-plane-2015-9
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Old Feb 14, 16, 8:55 am
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Originally Posted by CaliforniasCentralCoast View Post
This author makes some interesting points about dressing on flights at
http://www.businessinsider.com/why-y...a-plane-2015-9
Too short. I'm afraid it won't convince many readers.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 9:23 am
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Originally Posted by CaliforniasCentralCoast View Post
This author makes some interesting points about dressing on flights at
http://www.businessinsider.com/why-y...a-plane-2015-9
Looks like another Business Insider load of nonsense to me.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 9:32 am
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Originally Posted by zitsky View Post
Too short. I'm afraid it won't convince many readers.
Unconvincing.

Back in the days before a computer hidden deep in a salt mine determined all the upgrades, I didn't have any trouble getting upgrades wearing jeans or shorts and a t-shirt. I still get the occasional upgrade, and it gets determined long before any airport staff ever see what I'm wearing. I've also generally gotten fine service from the FA's, both in Y and in the occasional up front seat, regardless of what I'm wearing - good enough that I'm often amazed at the number of complaints that people have about FA's, because I really don't see much bad service.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 9:57 am
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Interesting discussion. I guess I tend to dress up more than most when I fly, but that's because I tend to dress nicely most places I go. I don't do it to impress anybody; I just like to look presentable and I feel good about my self-image when I feel like I look my best. Unless it's the middle of summer, my go-to travel trousers are a pair of wool slacks that are softer than pajamas.

I still think it's tacky to wear gym shorts or sweatpants in public, and flip flops are for the pool/beach. Some days I'm convinced that Americans won't be satisfied until they can wear their underwear in public. Planes get so cold, so I can't understand how bare legs, bare arms, and bare feet can be comfortable.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 10:21 am
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Originally Posted by violist View Post
Looks like another Business Insider load of nonsense to me.
"Load of nonsense" is the dressed up for First Class version of "total crock".

Upgrades are passed out by status, not footwear. This article was written by some stuffed shirt flunky who resents still having to wear a suit and tie while the rest of the world passed him up.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 10:35 am
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Flipflops and simiilar open shoes (or high heels) aren't wise from a safety viewpoint. There was a plane crash (and fire IIRC) where the investigators determined that a bunch of female SQ FAs would have lived if they had been wearing footwear other than the little slippers that go with their uniforms. Ever since then, they are required to wear sturdy closed black shoes for takeoff and landing.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 10:40 am
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Generally, comfort rules. Loose, comfortable clothing that breathes, doesn't wrinkle easily. Perhaps a track suit for a very long haul / long haul red eye. Comfortable, easy to don and doff hard sole tie shoes - safety considerations require those and clothing that is natural fabric, not synthetic plastic, which is nasty in fire conditions. (Habits from the days I was a pilot, for one thing.)

For would be self-appointed fashion police who might try imposing their standard on me or comment negatively on my choices, given I don't care or comment about theirs, I'd offer two words - and you may properly guess they're not "merry Christmas " or "happy birthday..

Last edited by JDiver; Feb 14, 16 at 10:47 am
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Old Feb 14, 16, 2:16 pm
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Originally Posted by CurbedEnthusiasm View Post
I guess I tend to dress up more than most when I fly, but that's because I tend to dress nicely most places I go. I don't do it to impress anybody; I just like to look presentable and I feel good about my self-image when I feel like I look my best. Unless it's the middle of summer, my go-to travel trousers are a pair of wool slacks that are softer than pajamas.
For me at least, this addresses it nicely. There are near 7 billion people on the planet and it's 2016, not 1969. Times and attitudes about public presentation have changed amongst many - but not all. And that's fine.

That said, I actually support establishments such as restaurants or clubs that have a dress code. While such a code would be inappropriate onboard an airplane, in the case of a restaurant or club it's the right of the establishment to promote the ambience they prefer, and often those preferences are mirrored by a majority of the patrons. Those who disagree are welcome to take their business to the many other options available to them.

I do think the assumption that all or most well dressed flyers are DYKWIA types reflects an immature world view. To each their own.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 2:23 pm
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I dress the same wether I am flying DL Y to DCA or CX F to SIN.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 2:25 pm
  #102  
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
Flipflops and simiilar open shoes (or high heels) aren't wise from a safety viewpoint. There was a plane crash (and fire IIRC) where the investigators determined that a bunch of female SQ FAs would have lived if they had been wearing footwear other than the little slippers that go with their uniforms. Ever since then, they are required to wear sturdy closed black shoes for takeoff and landing.
First of all, none of those flight attendants died because of their shoes. The issue arose over PR concerns that the f/as panicked and couldn't help the passengers and that some said it was because of shoes.

Secondly, it seems a little silly to choose your footwear on the very unlikely event you might get into a survivable crash in which shoes make a difference.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 2:31 pm
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Interesting question for our modern times.

When I flew with my parents growing up, my mother always made sure I was in suit and tie as a child. Of course, those were the Pan Am days.

As an adult, when I travel for business, I'll just wear my business suit. Unlike most business travelers, I always keep my jacket on and never hang it up. I have things in my jacket pockets that I'd prefer to keep on my persons during the flight.

For non-business travel, I just wear a sports coat and slacks, but without the tie.
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Old Feb 14, 16, 3:22 pm
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Originally Posted by JDiver View Post
For would be self-appointed fashion police who might try imposing their standard on me or comment negatively on my choices, given I don't care or comment about theirs, I'd offer two words - and you may properly guess they're not "merry Christmas " or "happy birthday..
You seem pretty defensive. What does it matter to you what someone says about your clothes?

I guess I get pretty tired of all the people that dress down who seem to think they deserve a pat on the back for doing it. If you dress down, then just do it. Most of the time I wear jeans and a t-shirt in coach but I do, occasionally dress up a little for business/first. But I like seeing people who are dressed up. I hate flip flops because I can hear you walking and I can smell your sweaty feet.

People may not think clothing matters but I bet they agree on standards when the person next to them smells like a pile of garbage or like a perfume bottle. What happens to personal choice then?
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Old Feb 14, 16, 3:40 pm
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Originally Posted by zitsky View Post
People may not think clothing matters but I bet they agree on standards when the person next to them smells like a pile of garbage or like a perfume bottle. What happens to personal choice then?
These days, I think it's more important to avoid offending another's olfactory senses than what we wear.

Admittedly, once upon a time, I probably felt it was more appropriate to adhere to more formal dressing, but not anymore. Now, I think it's fine to wear whatever is comfortable, though I prefer people to refrain from going barefoot.

It's a personal choice, I think. I just feel more comfortable in sports coat & slacks, never wearing a cap/hat in a restaurant, and in a suit & tie when traveling for business.

Equally, I'm perfectly comfortable with whatever others choose to wear around me (so long as they have shoes of some kind!).
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