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Traveling from US to UK and back, Dual Citizen question

Traveling from US to UK and back, Dual Citizen question

Old Nov 19, 15, 2:58 am
  #1  
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Traveling from US to UK and back, Dual Citizen question

Sorry if this is in the wrong forum, please move if appropriate.

I am a UK citizen that lives in the US and I will (hopefully) also soon be a US citizen.

Shortly after that, I have to take a trip back to the UK. I'll be flying PVD-EWR-MAN-EWR-PVD.

I'm a little confused about which passport I would use at each point of my journey. Obviously by law I just enter and exit the US using my US passport and obviously I want to enter the UK using my UK passport, so I'm not sure which passport to use/show at each point, starting with booking the ticket at united.com.

I have read a few guides to traveling as a dual citizen online, but they all seem to offer slightly differing advice.

Are the any US/UK dual citizens on flyertalk who travel between the two countries regularly that could walk me thought their process?

Thanks.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 4:15 am
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Originally Posted by swiftaw View Post
Sorry if this is in the wrong forum, please move if appropriate.

I am a UK citizen that lives in the US and I will (hopefully) also soon be a US citizen.

Shortly after that, I have to take a trip back to the UK. I'll be flying PVD-EWR-MAN-EWR-PVD.

I'm a little confused about which passport I would use at each point of my journey. Obviously by law I just enter and exit the US using my US passport and obviously I want to enter the UK using my UK passport, so I'm not sure which passport to use/show at each point, starting with booking the ticket at united.com.

I have read a few guides to traveling as a dual citizen online, but they all seem to offer slightly differing advice.

Are the any US/UK dual citizens on flyertalk who travel between the two countries regularly that could walk me thought their process?

Thanks.
You can either one at either portal, but you will need to carry both if you mix. UK will stamp your U.S., so if the US doesn't see a stamp,they may ask why.

They are used to dual nationals in this melting pot of a world.

Both of passports can be used with GEOS by the way.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 5:26 am
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I have US/UK citizenship. They tell you that you have to use your US passport at all times, which I have done Maybe it is best to stick to your US passport and just suck it up if the immigration lines are too long (I'm looking at you CDG).

When I checked in using the iPhone app it asked me which documents I was using. I added my US passport and had to take photos using the app. As I recall it was a bit hit and miss. I might have had to show my new passport at the counter , I can't remember.

If you have Global Entry on a green card attached to your UK passport then that is a bit of a pain. I showed up at the downtown NYC processing center and wasn't allowed into the building without an appointment. I tried to make an appointment but found it was only for new applications. I tried to change my documents online (new passport) but that only works for US->US passport changes. Eventually I went to EWR a few hours before my next flight as they take drop ins. After 35 minutes of hanging around in front of a sign saying "do not approach this door" and being roundly ignored by everyone inside the glass walled office I approached the door, got yelled at, but eventually got processed (after a lecture on security).
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Old Nov 19, 15, 5:49 am
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I never had a problem arriving in the US on my US passport and arriving in the UK on my UK passport. UA can keep both in its profile.
I once tried to. Enter the UK on my US passport and the Immigration officer was not happy: he made me produce my UK passport and told me always to enter on that.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 5:53 am
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Originally Posted by lhrsfo View Post
I never had a problem arriving in the US on my US passport and arriving in the UK on my UK passport. UA can keep both in its profile.
I once tried to. Enter the UK on my US passport and the Immigration officer was not happy: he made me produce my UK passport and told me always to enter on that.
This.

Always enter a country using that country's passport if you have it. You can leave the US on a US passport (no real checks anyways) and enter the UK on the UK one from the same flight. It is what you're supposed to do.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 7:06 am
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Originally Posted by swiftaw View Post
. . . I am a UK citizen that lives in the US and I will (hopefully) also soon be a US citizen. . .
You cannot keep your other citizenships if you naturalize in the US. You have to renounce them.

Of course, DHS and DoS almost never check, so this is hardly ever enforced. However, if you're employed in certain fields (politics, legal, etc.), it's highly advisable to play by the book.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 7:51 am
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Originally Posted by ont View Post
Originally Posted by swiftaw View Post
. . . I am a UK citizen that lives in the US and I will (hopefully) also soon be a US citizen. . .
You cannot keep your other citizenships if you naturalize in the US. You have to renounce them.

Of course, DHS and DoS almost never check, so this is hardly ever enforced. However, if you're employed in certain fields (politics, legal, etc.), it's highly advisable to play by the book.

That is true - the US will require that you renounce. However, if you are a UK citizen they consider that to be a renouncement under duress which is ineffective. It is possible to maintain your UK citizenship. Not something they will tell you how to do - but possible.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 7:59 am
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Originally Posted by ont View Post
You cannot keep your other citizenships if you naturalize in the US. You have to renounce them.

Of course, DHS and DoS almost never check, so this is hardly ever enforced. However, if you're employed in certain fields (politics, legal, etc.), it's highly advisable to play by the book.
Totally false!!!!!
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Old Nov 19, 15, 8:03 am
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Originally Posted by ont View Post
You cannot keep your other citizenships if you naturalize in the US. You have to renounce them.

Of course, DHS and DoS almost never check, so this is hardly ever enforced. However, if you're employed in certain fields (politics, legal, etc.), it's highly advisable to play by the book.
That's not true. The US allows dual citizenship, there is no requirement to renounce. Other countries may not allow dual citizenship, but certainly between the UK and the US dual citizenship is perfectly allowed and quite common.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 12:46 pm
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So which passport would I use for API? UK one on the outbound flight, and US on the return? Or does it matter?

Last edited by swiftaw; Nov 19, 15 at 12:58 pm
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Old Nov 19, 15, 2:06 pm
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Originally Posted by ont View Post
You cannot keep your other citizenships if you naturalize in the US. You have to renounce them...
That changed several decades ago.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 2:15 pm
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Originally Posted by FirstInFlight View Post
That is true - the US will require that you renounce.....
Not so according to US Department of State.

U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one nationality or another.
...................
Most U.S. nationals, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by the foreign country to use its passport to enter and leave that country. Use of the foreign passport does not endanger U.S. nationality.
http://travel.state.gov/content/trav...tionality.html
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Old Nov 19, 15, 2:16 pm
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Originally Posted by swiftaw View Post
So which passport would I use for API? UK one on the outbound flight, and US on the return? Or does it matter?
You are required to leave and re-enter the US on your US passport so you need to use that for API. The airline will check on departure and both the airline and CBP on return. You can use the UK passport for entry to the UK. I haven't yet had Border Force ask why I do not show as having been on an incoming flight and they don't ask for that information whereas CBP know and check.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 7:04 pm
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This is a topic that often leads to confusion. If you are a U.S. citizen and you wish to become a citizen of another country you are not required to renounce your U.S. citizenship unless the other country requires it.

However, if you are a foreign national and you wish to become a U.S. citizen you do in fact have to renounce your other citizenship. Here is the oath you must take to become a U.S. citizen:

"I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God."

http://www.uscis.gov/us-citizenship/...states-america

If you were born in the U.S. you take no oath.

As noted above, U.S. law does not recognize dual nationality - but doesn't prohibit it either. U.S. law is simply silent on the issue. So there is a double standard - if you were born a U.S. citizen and wish to add a second citizenship, unless the new country requires otherwise, you can be a citizen of both (and in some circumstances more than two). However, if you are a foreign national and you want to become a U.S. citizen you must renounce all other citizenships.

However, in the case of a U.K. national, the U.K. deems such renounciation to be made under duress and ineffective. Thus, from the U.S. perspective you renounced but from the U.K. perspective you did not do so effectively and you can maintain a U.K. passport. And since U.S. law is silent on the issue you can exist in that ambiguous state.
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Old Nov 19, 15, 7:33 pm
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Originally Posted by ont View Post
You cannot keep your other citizenships if you naturalize in the US. You have to renounce them.
Not exactly right. Renouncing loyalty to other countries is part of the oath. But US courts have ruled it meaningless. You can have dual citizenship in the US.
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