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The Economist - upcoming Airline Technology

The Economist - upcoming Airline Technology

Old Jun 1, 15, 2:14 am
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The Economist - upcoming Airline Technology

http://www.economist.com/news/techno...you-fly-flying


Windows out, video windows in. Lighter seats, which move and change shape depending on how much you pay. More composites to make the aircraft lighter. And a return to supersonic travel (but only at mach 1.6 rather than mach 2).
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Old Jun 1, 15, 2:51 am
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Interesting stuff. The industry is conservative enough, I suspect actual adoption of the more interesting things there is a long way off, but some of the more incremental options may be here sooner.
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Old Jun 1, 15, 6:07 am
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The industry is indeed conservative but it will move fast when there's money to be saved
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Old Jun 1, 15, 9:06 am
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LOL, most of the stuff in the first few paragraphs will not happen during any of our lifetimes. The industry, both airlines and the FAA, simply do not move that fast.
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Old Jun 1, 15, 12:58 pm
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Originally Posted by lhrsfo View Post
The industry is indeed conservative but it will move fast when there's money to be saved
Originally Posted by planemechanic View Post
LOL, most of the stuff in the first few paragraphs will not happen during any of our lifetimes. The industry, both airlines and the FAA, simply do not move that fast.
Unless it can have a monetary payback within the life-span of the aircraft.
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Old Jun 1, 15, 4:47 pm
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Originally Posted by Worcester View Post
http://www.economist.com/news/techno...you-fly-flying


Windows out, video windows in. Lighter seats, which move and change shape depending on how much you pay. More composites to make the aircraft lighter. And a return to supersonic travel (but only at mach 1.6 rather than mach 2).
SAS tried the moveable seats in the 1990s. On TATL flights, they offered FC and business class in the same cabin. If someone bought a FC seat, apparently the mechanics would remove two rows of business class and replace them by a much bigger FC seat, almost lie flat. AFAIK the service and F&B were the same. I thought it was strange.
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Old Jun 1, 15, 5:32 pm
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I wouldn't voluntarily board a plane without windows. I want to see what's going on outside - with my own eyes, not just on a screen. I don't even like the 787's electrochromic windows that much because I can't look out if the crew decides to dim them.
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Old Jun 2, 15, 3:59 pm
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I am among those that would refuse to board a plane without windows, no matter how good the video screens are. And while I respect The Economist as a source of business and financial reporting, some of their technological predictions are way left field. Even if some of the predictions make financial sense, most of the concepts presented in the article are just that. The actual costs incurred from various stages of the product from design all the way to certification and installation are very expensive, and many products never make it to market if the manufacturers realize there is not sufficient interest to offset the development costs.
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Old Jun 2, 15, 4:06 pm
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I'm of the school that all window shades should be up for takeoff and landing so that rescue personnel can see inside and so that in daylight there's natural light to help passengers escape in an accident. [At night, flood lights can be aimed at aircraft windows.] So to me, having windows is a safety issue.
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Old Jun 2, 15, 4:46 pm
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Originally Posted by MSPeconomist View Post
I'm of the school that all window shades should be up for takeoff and landing so that rescue personnel can see inside and so that in daylight there's natural light to help passengers escape in an accident. [At night, flood lights can be aimed at aircraft windows.] So to me, having windows is a safety issue.
Fairly sure that electrochromic windows, like LCDs, default to "clear" in the event of an electric failure.
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Old Jun 3, 15, 1:25 pm
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I agree that windows are both a good idea and a very important safety item.

But, seeing that on the vast majority of flights I am now on most of the window shades are down, what is the big deal? Why bother with video screens at all? People won't be looking at those - they are more interested in the 7in screen in front of them.
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