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Freaking out passenger forces plane back to gate

Freaking out passenger forces plane back to gate

Old Feb 14, 13, 1:19 pm
  #31  
 
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Unhappy

Originally Posted by wrp96 View Post
As to the luggage, I don't know about you but if somebody is to the point of screaming "we're all going to die" and forces her way off the plane, then I definitely DON'T want her luggage remaining onboard with me. For an international flight, it would be required to remove her luggage, for a domestic flight it would be the smart thing to do as well.
As much as I hate to miss connecting flight onwards, etc.
I agree I do not want her luggage sitting somewhere in the same airplane with me.
I feel so sorry for you and the fellow passengers who had to endure this event.
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Old Feb 14, 13, 1:22 pm
  #32  
 
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Originally Posted by nrr View Post
There were a few FA's going back to NY but they "suddenly realized" they were needed in Paris.
This is very funny. I've never heard of this.
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Old Feb 14, 13, 1:32 pm
  #33  
 
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Exactly the same scenario happened to me
in year 2000 on a CO flight from Brazil to Newark.
It took at least 2 hours to offload the containerized luggage.

We never knew the exact reason for the pax change of heart,
pilot said "passenger doesn't want to go, we dont want him onboard".
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Old Feb 14, 13, 8:08 pm
  #34  
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I don't think the pilot handled it very well. He should have simply said "we have a medical emergency" rather than "someone has decided they don't want to fly with us tonight".

I can sympathize with her, but unless this was the woman's first panic attack, she may have been able to have some medication on hand. Then again, she may not.

If I were the airline, I would ban her until she produces a doctor's note stating that her condition has been addressed and she can fly safely.
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Old Feb 15, 13, 3:18 am
  #35  
 
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The discussion here shows that there is still a massive amount of ignorance about mental disorders. "Pull her sh** together"? Wow!

It's a goddamn disorder that can attack suddenly without any notice. How would YOU pull your sh** together if you slipped in the plane lav and broke your hip, or had a stroke during a flight?

How do we know if this was first attack, or she was taking or not taking meds. You can have an attack even if you are taking meds.
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Old Feb 15, 13, 4:16 am
  #36  
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Originally Posted by FN-GM View Post
Its been a rule since lockerbie, if the pax leaves so do the bags.
Actually, the US never implemented total baggage reconciliation The rest of the world did, but it was not implemented on US domestic flights. I'm not sure if it was brought in post 911 when it was realised terrorism can occur in the US too or not.

Originally Posted by alanh
All luggage is supposed to have advanced screening, so (for domestic flights at least) positive bag matching is not required. A few years ago I had a bag leave without me (there was a huge backup at security), to DCA no less.

And there's various operational issues where your bag may miss your flight and take another one.
Relying on advanced screening however does not allow for operational mistakes. Hence why in Europe, total baggage reconciliation is still the norm. If you have a bag which misconnects, it gets additional screening before it is allowed to fly unaccompanied.
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Old Feb 15, 13, 7:07 am
  #37  
 
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I think words from the last statement, "banning people.." isn't necessary, it really is an inconvenience but sometimes we don't know that a reason behind more than what we know, but I know its out of our business but a little understanding from everyone of us would help.
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Old Feb 16, 13, 5:01 pm
  #38  
 
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I say you get one free pass for the first panic attack. After that either take drugs to feel happy or sleepy, or drive. If it happens a second time the airline should require a medical release for you to fly with them again.
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Old Feb 17, 13, 12:23 am
  #39  
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Originally Posted by claireflyer View Post
but a little understanding from everyone of us would help.
How about a little understanding of logistics and cost? How about understanding that the needs of the one do not outweigh the needs of the many? I find it difficult to feel understanding at this high a price...especially for an irrational panic. People could miss interviews...be late on the first day...miss the death of a loved one...miss a connection..ruin a holiday not to mention the costs to the airline and schedule.

No, there is too much damage.

Big picture.
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Old Feb 18, 13, 10:31 pm
  #40  
 
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
How about a little understanding of logistics and cost? How about understanding that the needs of the one do not outweigh the needs of the many? I find it difficult to feel understanding at this high a price...especially for an irrational panic. People could miss interviews...be late on the first day...miss the death of a loved one...miss a connection..ruin a holiday not to mention the costs to the airline and schedule.

No, there is too much damage.

Big picture.
^ Agreed. There is so much that needs to go into account when they decide if they should go back for one passenger or not. People need to learn how to suck it up.
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Old Feb 19, 13, 12:36 am
  #41  
 
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Originally Posted by Medic1 View Post
Here's a follow up question: What if this woman had demanded to get off 10 minutes after wheels up? Do you turn around, or do you physically restrain her (if necessary) for the duration of the normally scheduled flight?
My wife was on a MCO - ORD flight some years ago. About 20 min's into the flight a FA got on the PA and asked if "medically trained persons" could come to the front of the aircraft - my wife and I are both Paramedics. She volunteered, evaluated a patient that was having a cardiac event, was asked several times if the patient could "make it" to Chicago which was still over 2 hours away. She said, in her opinion, "No", and the captain turned the plane around and returned to Orlando.

Tough situation all the way around and makes us not want to be involved or offer an opinion when there are so many interests effected. My wife did receive some negative comments from some pax but most were just concerned for the patient. She also received a personalized letter from UA's medical director and a $300 voucher for assisting on the flight.
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Old Feb 19, 13, 1:26 am
  #42  
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Originally Posted by CubsFanJohn View Post
^ Agreed. There is so much that needs to go into account when they decide if they should go back for one passenger or not. People need to learn how to suck it up.
Or, remember that scene in "Airplane!" when they line up to strike/slap the hysterical woman? Yeah. That.
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Old Feb 19, 13, 6:11 am
  #43  
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
How about a little understanding of logistics and cost? How about understanding that the needs of the one do not outweigh the needs of the many? I find it difficult to feel understanding at this high a price...especially for an irrational panic. People could miss interviews...be late on the first day...miss the death of a loved one...miss a connection..ruin a holiday not to mention the costs to the airline and schedule.

No, there is too much damage.

Big picture.
In almost all instances you mention, it would behoove the person to travel earlier than the last possible minute. When I travel, I always travel the day before I'm needed so as to not have to worry about schedules, even if that means travelling on a sunday.
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Old Feb 26, 13, 11:56 am
  #44  
 
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Originally Posted by Medic1 View Post
Was leaving PHI last night and we were taxiing for takeoff. Suddenly the pilot stomps on the brakes and gets on the PA, "Sorry folks, someone has decided they don't want to fly with us tonight. We're going back to the gate." It was a huge pain. They had to unload nearly all the luggage while they looked for this woman's luggage. We were late to our destination, people missed connecting flights, it was a mess. While most of us didn't hear any commotion, the pilot told me afterwards that the woman had a panic attack and was "freaking out." He just decided to take her back to the gate to avoid further problems.

I've flown a lot over the years, and I've never seen this happen before
This actually happened to us on JetBlue from LAS-BUR back in Sept, and I remember the Pilot get on the PA and ask if someone was on board to help,someone did but by that time someone opened the medical box (not sure the term) and we had to wait for another Box to be delivered before taking off,the whole thing lasted longer then our 40 minute flight home.

Originally Posted by nautilus View Post
If it was up me I would have let the woman off the airplane as per what occurred but left her luggage on board. Her luggage could have been returned to her at a later date.

The delay in searching for her luggage afterwards clearly caused further disruption to countless passengers / staff. Or am I being too harsh?
I agree and disagree with you,but I can see both sides to it.

Originally Posted by wrp96 View Post
As someone who has had panic attacks (not on planes thank goodness), no you can't control how or when you react - my problem spot is heights and I work in a tall building.I can't handle being on the 4th floor of a building - unable to breathe, feel like I'm going to pass out, I usually get very quiet as I'm trying to focus and calm myself (doesn't always work).
4th floor? WOW,I am sorry but amazing,I work in a 23 story building.

Originally Posted by pragakhan View Post
Never saw the Final Destination movie series have ya?
Hahaha.

Originally Posted by cbn42 View Post
I don't think the pilot handled it very well. He should have simply said "we have a medical emergency" rather than "someone has decided they don't want to fly with us tonight".
I agree,but some Pilots like to silly when making a PA announcement that many passengers will make them upset.

Originally Posted by Fireman812 View Post
She also received a personalized letter from UA's medical director and a $300 voucher for assisting on the flight.
Awesome!

Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
Or, remember that scene in "Airplane!" when they line up to strike/slap the hysterical woman? Yeah. That.
Hahaha. Even nuns were getting into it.
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Old Feb 26, 13, 12:28 pm
  #45  
 
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Originally Posted by MrHalliday View Post
Exactly the same scenario happened to me
in year 2000 on a CO flight from Brazil to Newark.
It took at least 2 hours to offload the containerized luggage.

We never knew the exact reason for the pax change of heart,
pilot said "passenger doesn't want to go, we dont want him onboard".
In the year 2000, I was on a US Air flight from PHL to FCO. One of the passengers insisted on sitting in the galley with the flight attendants for take-off. He refused to take his assigned seat, so the Pilot announced that we were returning to the gate, and the suspicious passenger and his luggage were removed from the plane.

This caused at least a two hour delay to an already late flight.
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