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Peanuts not served on flight because a passenger had peanut allergy

Peanuts not served on flight because a passenger had peanut allergy

Old Dec 17, 12, 9:29 pm
  #46  
 
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Originally Posted by hedur View Post
Exactly.



From the OP:



Even diabetics who bring their own food to manage their condition are asked to put their needs aside in favor of someone else's medical condition. Sorry, it's not right. If someone is so allergic that a person in a different row can't eat the peanuts they brought on, then they should either not fly or, as someone else suggested, wear a filtered mask and latex gloves. That would be their only protection from the numerous peanut particles left from previous flights anyway.
You make a good point.
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Old Dec 18, 12, 8:09 am
  #47  
 
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Originally Posted by JerryFF View Post
If you are diabetic, I would assume that you would choose not to rely on airplane cuisine to manage your diet.


Originally posted by lovely15
"Personally, I'm just tired of everyone's issues affecting me. I have enough problems of my own to deal with, and no one's bending over backwards to help me with those. I can't emotionally handle other people's health problems. That's what happened to my empathy."

I think that pretty much sums up many of the conflicts in our society today.
I'd also like to add that if you are diabetic, I'd like to think you have additional plans to monitor your glucose, other than peanuts. I have family members who manage their diabetes using other food items.

Likewise, I have a shrimp allergy which runs in my family. On a United EWR-LAS flight last month, three of us were served shrimp cocktail with our meals but we have the pleasure of simply not eating it to avoid any reaction. However, one of those same family members also has an allergy to walnuts. Coincidentally, on the return flight, we received a nuts packet with walnuts in it. She was asleep, but when I opened my pack and saw walnuts, I immediately took her bag and alerted the flight attendant and gave her both bags. Crisis resolved.

I feel inclined to think those without a food allergy lack the empathy necessary to understand how detrimental this can truly be and how it impacts your life. There is no need to place blame on something that is not the fault of the human, other than its body overreacting.
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Old Dec 18, 12, 8:41 am
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Originally Posted by JerryFF View Post
If you are diabetic, I would assume that you would choose not to rely on airplane cuisine to manage your diet.
They aren't. They're bringing their own on board, then being told they can't eat them. In other words, they're doing the responsible thing, knowing their medical limitations, then are told they can't do that because someone else wasn't as responsible about their medical problems. Big issue.
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Old Dec 18, 12, 9:23 am
  #49  
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Originally Posted by Javelin View Post
Hmminteresting.

I'm not doubtful of this or anything but do you have a link to said paper? I would be very interested in reading it. Thanks!
I don't - it was inside a magazine some years ago. I don't remember all the ins and outs, but it was something to do with the aflatoxin on the peanuts, rather than the peanuts themselves, and it affecting crops in North America more than Africa (not sure if it was because of peanut species, or climate, etc).

In looking for the article, however, I found another opinion piece about allergies, and how higher instances of consumption can cause higher instances of allergies. I had never had peanut butter before I visited the US - I struggle to think of a child I know here in Canada who hasn't had peanut butter. The article mentions that in Japan, people are allergic to rice - in North America, that is incredibly rare, and it is considered a hypoallergenic food. Interesting.
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Old Dec 18, 12, 8:32 pm
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Of course, this is carried far to far to satisfy the lawyers. Your problem is not my problem and I resent you making it so. I will never do anything to harm you, but if I eat a peanut butter sandwich on a plane and you are affected, that is YOUR problem, not mine.
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Old Dec 18, 12, 8:44 pm
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Originally Posted by lovely15 View Post
They aren't. They're bringing their own on board, then being told they can't eat them. In other words, they're doing the responsible thing, knowing their medical limitations, then are told they can't do that because someone else wasn't as responsible about their medical problems. Big issue.
Please explain exactly how trying to travel with a life threatening allergy to peanuts constitutes "wasn't as responsible about their medical problems" because as it stands, your post is quite offensive to those who must live severe allergies over which they have no control. That's right, when an allergy is that severe, it is out of human control to stop a reaction when you are in contact with the allergen. Allergy shots, Benadryl, other drugs - all pretty much useless with that severe an allergy. The only option is to carry rescue medicines, such as an EpiPen, and pray they buy you enough time to reach a doctor.

Or are you one those who believe that for the convenience of society those with severe allergies should never leave their homes, as has been suggested in other FT posts?
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Old Dec 18, 12, 8:49 pm
  #52  
 
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Originally Posted by TravelGal2779 View Post
I feel inclined to think those without a food allergy lack the empathy necessary to understand how detrimental this can truly be and how it impacts your life. There is no need to place blame on something that is not the fault of the human, other than its body overreacting.
I don't get it. Why do people act as if they'd die a miserable death if they don't have peanuts on a flight? Is it really that hard to refrain from peanuts for a duration of a flight, even if it means making the flight safer one for a fellow passenger, who has this condition against their will? Is it that hard to be even that considerate for a fellow human being that they need to consume something that could potentially harm someone, and something that they rarely eat when not on a flight?
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Old Dec 18, 12, 9:18 pm
  #53  
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Originally Posted by hedur View Post
If someone is so allergic that a person in a different row can't eat the peanuts they brought on, then they should either not fly or, as someone else suggested, wear a filtered mask and latex gloves. That would be their only protection from the numerous peanut particles left from previous flights anyway.
Just because there might be peanut residue left over from a previous flight doesn't mean that people eating peanuts won't make any difference. That's like saying that if you smoke one cigarette, you might as well smoke the whole pack.

I have yet to hear a situation of a diabetic coming on a plane and needing to eat peanuts while another passenger has a peanut allergy. Yes, it theoretically could happen, and if it does, the airline would figure out a way to deal with it. But until then, it's not an issue, it's just an excuse.
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Old Dec 18, 12, 11:58 pm
  #54  
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Moderator note.

In the past day, this thread acquired some posts which were too personal and some posts have strayed from the FlyerTalk Rule of debating the topic and not the member.

We've made some edits and deletions; and hope that, going forward, the thread can remain topical and not personal. Thanks, Ocn Vw 1K, Moderator.
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Old Dec 19, 12, 1:40 am
  #55  
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food restrictions should be stated before boarding

On a non-food flight, a pax brings on his own peanut butter and jelly sandwich(s) to eat during the flight--only to find that he can't eat it since a peanut allergic passenger is on board.
The airline should make any food bans known before passengers board, so they can make other choices.
It is up to the allergic pax to make his/her condition known, well before boarding.
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Old Dec 19, 12, 6:14 am
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The social reaction to Peanut allergies are generally accepted to be a case of mass hysteria. That is not to say that sufferers are nuts (sorry) or do not have a real medical condition but the response (like that of the airlines) is out of proportion to the incidence.

Seafood allergies are roughly 3x more prevalent, incidentally.

The poster pointing out that the planes are heavily contaminated with peanuts from earlier flights makes a cogent point that removing them from a flight due to the presence of an allergic sufferer is pointless. Perhaps those local to the sufferer coud be asked to refrain from consumption.
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Old Dec 19, 12, 9:56 am
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Originally Posted by CDTraveler View Post
Please explain exactly how trying to travel with a life threatening allergy to peanuts constitutes "wasn't as responsible about their medical problems" because as it stands, your post is quite offensive to those who must live severe allergies over which they have no control. That's right, when an allergy is that severe, it is out of human control to stop a reaction when you are in contact with the allergen. Allergy shots, Benadryl, other drugs - all pretty much useless with that severe an allergy. The only option is to carry rescue medicines, such as an EpiPen, and pray they buy you enough time to reach a doctor.

Or are you one those who believe that for the convenience of society those with severe allergies should never leave their homes, as has been suggested in other FT posts?
Hey, I don't have diabetes or allergies, so I have no dog in this fight. I'm just calling it as I see it. I do not like my issues affecting others, so if I am in such a situation, YES, I would stay home or take a bus, train, or car, where medical help was readily available for my very serious medical condition. That's the responsible thing to do, and one that keeps your problem your problem and not everyone else's.

I guess I'd ask you, if a diabetic ended up in the hospital because he/she wasn't allowed to eat their nuts on an airplane, would you be as compassionate? I think not.

By the way, AA, and I can't remember where, states that they can't control others passengers from bringing nuts on board, so passengers with several allergies are advised to take precautions. Do other airlines really not have this policy? Seems reasonable to me.
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Old Dec 19, 12, 10:13 am
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Originally Posted by Segments View Post
Eating nuts is not optional for everyone. Diabetics use them to manage their blood sugar. Notification of a nut ban after boarding gives no option to find alternatives. Ever experience a severe hypoglycemic event? To quote you, "If you're still alive after that, we'll talk".
Knowing that peanuts may be a common allergen, and knowing that nuts are not the only option, I would hope that diabetics bring something other than nuts to manage blood sugar.
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Old Dec 19, 12, 10:34 am
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Originally Posted by Palal View Post
Knowing that peanuts may be a common allergen, and knowing that nuts are not the only option, I would hope that diabetics bring something other than nuts to manage blood sugar.
I don't personally know anyone who has a severe nut allergy - I'd guess it's not on most people's radar when planning a flight. Wow.
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Old Dec 19, 12, 11:43 am
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Originally Posted by Palal View Post

Knowing that peanuts may be a common allergen, and knowing that nuts are not the only option, I would hope that diabetics bring something other than nuts to manage blood sugar.
Nuts are always in my carry on because they are compact, easily portable and a regular part of my diet. I pack to manage my health not that of a hypothetical pax on the same flight.

What protein substitute do you suggest that doesn't require refrigeration, is low sodium, and low carb? Also a high fiber substitute for the almonds and good omega 3 substitute for the walnuts? Do I get a third carry on bag to accommodate your allergy? Think I'll stick to advice from my physician.

If I can reasonably accommodate a nearby pax request I will do so. I recently skipped the lime in my seltzer water since the person sitting next to me mentioned a severe citrus allergy (seriously)

Ultimately I will follow the flight safety advice and take care of myself first (parallel to oxygen mask - secure yourself first before assisting others)

Last edited by Segments; Dec 19, 12 at 11:56 am
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