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Travelling as a minor

Travelling as a minor

Old Nov 27, 12, 1:39 pm
  #16  
 
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Originally Posted by flame7926 View Post
I didn't get asked this this summer going to India and hadn't heard of needing one until now. Again, is it a legal issue or just something they would like you to have?



I do remember Mexico being a ton of trouble when we were taking my cousin back when her parents left earlier.
You said you did a "group trip" to India. This gives the impression that you were part of an organized group where there were people over 18 or 21 in charge of the group. If you signed up as part of a travel group there was probably some paperwork somewhere giving the organizers some authority over the minors in the group. This probably meant no need for any other official paperwork from each individuals.
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Old Nov 27, 12, 5:50 pm
  #17  
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Originally Posted by MoreMilesPlease View Post
You said you did a "group trip" to India. This gives the impression that you were part of an organized group where there were people over 18 or 21 in charge of the group. If you signed up as part of a travel group there was probably some paperwork somewhere giving the organizers some authority over the minors in the group. This probably meant no need for any other official paperwork from each individuals.
There weren't any doing any of the traveling. The adults met each of us after security when we landed in New Delhi.
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Old Nov 28, 12, 4:59 am
  #18  
 
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Originally Posted by B747-437B View Post
While you may be able to do the flying yourself, you still cannot hold a CPL until you are 18 years old. Therefore, you will need to be accompanied by a CFI if you want to do the flying.
CPL?

For that kind of flying, do PPL holders need to fly with CFI?
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Old Nov 28, 12, 6:51 am
  #19  
 
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Originally Posted by pinniped View Post
I would definitely carry the notarized letter. Whether you need it or not depends on the immigration officer(s) you encounter along the way, but I'd want to have it just in case.
Be aware that in the UK certainly, and probably other countries, not everyone will have heard of a notary. While they exist, they aren't a common thing here.

The letter signed by parents may still be useful, though, especially if it has a contact telephone number on it. Just don't expect anything other than "it's what?" if you point out that it's notarised.

Neil
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Old Nov 28, 12, 9:54 am
  #20  
 
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Better to be safe than sorry....

I would certainly suggest carrying a parent/guardian notarized letter as described above, and pinniped's student ID seems a valuable adjunct (potentially saving a little money, here and there - and Europeans are into "student status", with grey-bearded, middle aged "students" in evidence). Depending upon your "look" (dress, demeanor, companions, etc.), many US hotels and some of the more upscale European hotels may be age-sensitive. Europeans do tend to accord "adult" status for many activities at an earlier age than do US jurisdictions. Having grown up and traveled in a world pre-debit & credit cards, perhaps I'm less secure than many, and always travel with 2 working CCs and 2 DCs.

The old rule of thumb: If you were tall enough to put your coins up on the counter/bar, most places in Europe would serve/accommodate you.....
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Old Nov 30, 12, 12:43 am
  #21  
 
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As you're from the US I'd concur on getting the notarized letter stating you are traveling with permission and knowledge by your parents to avoid any possible immigration hiccups. It's also good for them to put in the letter that they agree to be responsible for costs incurred by you at hotels based on standard practices of the hotel. My ex had to do this when I was 17 and traveling to see her in the UK as I would be checking into the hotel under her company's account so the hotel wanted some sort of letter saying someone would be responsible.
Another suggestion, which is a good idea to help you get solid credit established is to either get a credit card with your parent(s) as a cosigner or have your parents add you as an authorized user of one of their cards ...or both. This will give you the ability to not use up all your funds in your debit account and most hotels and such will more likely accept it. It's also a good idea in life to help establish yourself in the credit world. it seems your family trusts you enough.
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Old Nov 30, 12, 4:31 am
  #22  
 
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Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Originally Posted by B747-437B View Post
While you may be able to do the flying yourself, you still cannot hold a CPL until you are 18 years old. Therefore, you will need to be accompanied by a CFI if you want to do the flying.
CPL?

For that kind of flying, do PPL holders need to fly with CFI?
In the US, a PPL can be obtained at 17 and that allows the pilot to carry passengers with no CFI. Rules vary in other countries.
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Old Nov 30, 12, 9:11 am
  #23  
 
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Once, long ago, having been called to appear in court in Scotland as a "Guardian of the Person', I'll suggest that a document more acceptably appreciated than a "notarized letter" can be accomplished by essentially the same type letter officially filed in a local court (in Texas, before the County Judge), recorded, and with you carrying a certified copy of same. Takes only a few moments, minimal filing fee, and the stamps and certifications lend a lot of weight in foreign places, wrapped up as they often are in the trappings of officialdom.
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Old Nov 30, 12, 10:22 am
  #24  
 
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Originally Posted by flame7926 View Post
There weren't any doing any of the traveling. The adults met each of us after security when we landed in New Delhi.
Exactly. You had adults that were meeting you and taking responsibility for youn in the host country. If you are aware of the specifics of how the travel was arranged, by whom, how your financial requirements were guaranteed etc it might show the difference that group travel brings.

Group travel is a different animal than traveling alone while under aged.
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