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-   -   Old Timer's Airline Quiz and Discussion (https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/travelbuzz/1282073-old-timers-airline-quiz-discussion.html)

Toshbaf Jul 25, 19 8:23 pm

25. (1988) What’s this? You’re driving to work through the Toronto suburbs when you spy a billboard touting Toronto’s only direct (one-stop) service to the Virgin Islands – specifically St. Thomas. Hmm... You quickly call your wife. What do you think, honey? Wanna go to the Virgin Islands next month? Right on! You quickly book a pair of seats while your wife works on the hotels. Please identify the airline, aircraft and the enroute stop, eh!

American Airlines, Boeing 727-200, YYZ - LGA - STT

I don't think this is a chicken dinner answer, unfortunately

Seat 2A Jul 26, 19 1:48 am


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 31343301)
25. (1988) What’s this? You’re driving to work through the Toronto suburbs when you spy a billboard touting Toronto’s only direct (one-stop) service to the Virgin Islands – specifically St. Thomas. Hmm... You quickly call your wife. What do you think, honey? Wanna go to the Virgin Islands next month? Right on! You quickly book a pair of seats while your wife works on the hotels. Please identify the airline, aircraft and the enroute stop, eh!

American Airlines, Boeing 727-200, YYZ - LGA - STT ~ I don't think this is a chicken dinner answer, unfortunately...

No, T, it won't win you that chicken dinner just yet but it is enough for a pre-dinner cocktail and an appetizer on the house. American Airlines is correct, as is the 727-200. Now all were looking for is an enroute stop other than LGA (or anywhere else in the New York metropolitan area). Go get 'em!!


WHBM Jul 26, 19 5:23 am


Originally Posted by Seat 2A (Post 31338787)
Originally Posted by WHBM https://www.flyertalk.com/forum/imag...s/viewpost.gif
22. (1982) In 1982, only one airline operated a turboprop nonstop from the U.S. mainland to the far reaches (over 1000 miles from the U.S. mainland) of the West Indies. The flight operated twice weekly and continued on to another island where it overnighted before returning to the U.S. the next day. Identify the airline, the U.S. gateway airport, the two destination airports and the aircraft type.

1,000 miles to two islands seems to indicate the Dutch ABC islands - Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao, and if the flight was just twice weekly and came back to Miami the next day it seems to indicate it was operated by one of the Miami charter operators on someone else's behalf. Lets go for ALM who were using an Electra, leased from someone like Fleming International.

You're right about the Electra but the destination islands were not Aruba, Bonaire or Curacao. Nor was the airline ALM. Head up northeast a ways...

OK, I'm just wondering now if this was Grenada. It was the year before the Grenada invasion when the new Cuban-built airport was under way but the old airport with the short runway unsuitable for jets was still in use. New government who wanted a service. So, Grenada Airways, still with that Electra chartered from Miami, operating Miami-Grenada-Barbados.

Seat 2A Jul 26, 19 12:02 pm


Originally Posted by WHBM (Post 31344318)
22. (1982) In 1982, only one airline operated a turboprop nonstop from the U.S. mainland to the far reaches (over 1000 miles from the U.S. mainland) of the West Indies. The flight operated twice weekly and continued on to another island where it overnighted before returning to the U.S. the next day. Identify the airline, the U.S. gateway airport, the two destination airports and the aircraft type.

OK, I'm just wondering now if this was Grenada. It was the year before the Grenada invasion when the new Cuban-built airport was under way but the old airport with the short runway unsuitable for jets was still in use. New government who wanted a service. So, Grenada Airways, still with that Electra chartered from Miami, operating Miami-Grenada-Barbados.

It was not Grenada or Barbados. You'll want to head north quite a ways up the island chain to find the two islands we're looking for here. As to the airline - aside from the OAG I referenced this question from, I've been able to find very little information about it. That's not to say I haven't found anything, but it appears two airlines operated under this name, each with its own unique two-letter code. I did find an airline history site out of the UK (co.uk) that referenced our airline and indicated that it may have operated the Electra, a DC-6 and a Convair 880. I've yet to find any pictures of this airline's Electra, though I did find one of its 880!


jlemon Jul 26, 19 2:47 pm


Originally Posted by Seat 2A (Post 31338090)

22. (1982) In 1982, only one airline operated a turboprop nonstop from the U.S. mainland to the far reaches (over 1000 miles from the U.S. mainland) of the West Indies. The flight operated twice weekly and continued on to another island where it overnighted before returning to the U.S. the next day. Identify the airline, the U.S. gateway airport, the two destination airports and the aircraft type.
See Post 16031 & 16039

22. Could this have been a very obscure operator by the name of Sunjet International? I think I may have seen a Convair 880 with this name on the aircraft at Miami back in the early 1980's....but I'm not completely sure. As for the two destinations, I have no idea....but I shall guess Antigua and St. Maarten.

BTW, this is what made MIA such a fascinating airport back then: the considerable number of different airlines serving Miami, some of which did not serve any other destination in the U.S.

Toshbaf Jul 26, 19 9:12 pm

25. (1988) What’s this? You’re driving to work through the Toronto suburbs when you spy a billboard touting Toronto’s only direct (one-stop) service to the Virgin Islands – specifically St. Thomas. Hmm... You quickly call your wife. What do you think, honey? Wanna go to the Virgin Islands next month? Right on! You quickly book a pair of seats while your wife works on the hotels. Please identify the airline, aircraft and the enroute stop, eh!

I am shocked to get the pre-dinner cocktail! I thought I'd be boo'ed or kicked out of the restaurant for a completely wrong answer!

Already answered: American Airlines, Boeing 727-200

enroute stop: JFK

jrl767 Jul 26, 19 10:28 pm


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 31347179)
25. (1988) ... Already answered: American Airlines, Boeing 727-200
enroute stop: JFK


Originally Posted by Seat 2A (Post 31343981)
... enroute stop other than LGA (or anywhere else in the New York metropolitan area)

how about Raleigh/Durham (RDU)


Toshbaf Jul 26, 19 10:52 pm


Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 31347179)
25. (1988) What’s this? You’re driving to work through the Toronto suburbs when you spy a billboard touting Toronto’s only direct (one-stop) service to the Virgin Islands – specifically St. Thomas. Hmm... You quickly call your wife. What do you think, honey? Wanna go to the Virgin Islands next month? Right on! You quickly book a pair of seats while your wife works on the hotels. Please identify the airline, aircraft and the enroute stop, eh!

I am shocked to get the pre-dinner cocktail! I thought I'd be boo'ed or kicked out of the restaurant for a completely wrong answer!

Already answered: American Airlines, Boeing 727-200

enroute stop: JFK

Oops, JFK is in the New York metropolitan area.

MIA

Seat 2A Jul 27, 19 1:17 am


Originally Posted by jlemon (Post 31346155)
22. (1982) In 1982, only one airline operated a turboprop nonstop from the U.S. mainland to the far reaches (over 1000 miles from the U.S. mainland) of the West Indies. The flight operated twice weekly and continued on to another island where it overnighted before returning to the U.S. the next day. Identify the airline, the U.S. gateway airport, the two destination airports and the aircraft type.

Could this have been a very obscure operator by the name of Sunjet International? I think I may have seen a Convair 880 with this name on the aircraft at Miami back in the early 1980's....but I'm not completely sure. As for the two destinations, I have no idea....but I shall guess Antigua and St. Maarten.

Sunjet International is correct! So also is St. Maarten. However, the flight continued on to an airport other than Antigua, one much closer than Antigua. Please, tap this one in ^


Seat 2A Jul 27, 19 1:25 am

25. (1988) What’s this? You’re driving to work through the Toronto suburbs when you spy a billboard touting Toronto’s only direct (one-stop) service to the Virgin Islands – specifically St. Thomas. Hmm... You quickly call your wife. What do you think, honey? Wanna go to the Virgin Islands next month? Right on! You quickly book a pair of seats while your wife works on the hotels. Please identify the airline, aircraft and the enroute stop, eh!

Per Toshbaf: Already answered: American Airlines, Boeing 727-200. Enroute stop: MIA

Per jrl767: How about Raleigh/Durham (RDU)?

Both of these are excellent and very logical answers given AA's hubs of the day. Rather amazingly though, neither of them is the correct answer. Please, guess again! :D

Seat 2A Jul 27, 19 1:41 am

Origins of the phrase "Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!!"
 

Originally Posted by Toshbaf (Post 31347179)
I am shocked to get the pre-dinner cocktail! I thought I'd be boo'ed or kicked out of the restaurant for a completely wrong answer!

Here at the OTAQ&D I use the phrase “Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!!” a lot. I like its verbal panache and the sheer joy of the expression. As to its origins, the phrase began on the Vegas strip when, back in the day, most every casino offered a $1.79 three-piece chicken dinner, which included a potato and a veggie. During that time period, this chicken dinner was the most common, cheapest meal around. Back in those days, a standard bet was $2. If you won a hand, you would have enough money to buy this dinner, hence the call of glorious victory would ring out “Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!!

Most of the time here at the OTAQ&D a correct answer will win you the undying admiration or your friends and fellow participants, and quite possibly that of our many anonymous lurkers. Occasionally, if you should arrange a get together with a fellow participant, you just might finagle a chicken dinner or better (Thanks, jlemon!!)

Another phrase I like to use around here is "You Da Man! I remember the first time I employed this phrase with WHBM, it threw him for a bit of a loop as it is not likely heard in his part of the world. "You Da Man!!" is essentially "You're The Man" as popularized in American ebonic vernacular. It conveys admiration for someone who's just done something well or amazing.

Now to take this a step further, after one of his many correct answers complete with amazing detail and entertaining color commentary, WHBM would be well within his rights to holler "Who Da Man?!" to which we would naturally respond in gleeful and heartfelt unison "You Da Man!!" indicating that WHBM has once again amazed us with another fantastic answer or story.

WHBM, You Da Man!!

As are the rest a youse on occasion! ^^

jlemon Jul 27, 19 8:15 am


Originally Posted by Seat 2A (Post 31338090)

22. (1982) In 1982, only one airline operated a turboprop nonstop from the U.S. mainland to the far reaches (over 1000 miles from the U.S. mainland) of the West Indies. The flight operated twice weekly and continued on to another island where it overnighted before returning to the U.S. the next day. Identify the airline, the U.S. gateway airport, the two destination airports and the aircraft type.
See Post 16031 & 16039

22. So....we are looking for an airfield not too far from SXM that could handle an Electra. We know the airport in question was located closer to St. Maarten than Antigua.

And speaking of St. Maarten......

https://www.airliners.net/photo/Amer...Empzox%2BAAx%2

Had that B727-200 freighter (with winglets) been any lower, I think I may have then had sand blown into my rum drink. And I would not have been happy.... :eek:

Back to business.....Anguilla? Nope. And certainly not St. Barts or Statia. So let's go with St. Kitts.

And now back to live coverage on NBC of Stage 20 of the Tour de France and the last day of bicycle racing in the beautiful French Alps..... :cool:

jrl767 Jul 27, 19 9:02 am


Originally Posted by Seat 2A (Post 31347550)
25. (1988) ... Toronto’s only direct (one-stop) service to the Virgin Islands – specifically St. Thomas. ... Please identify the airline, aircraft and the enroute stop, eh!

Per Toshbaf: Already answered: American Airlines, Boeing 727-200. Enroute stop: MIA

Per jrl767: How about Raleigh/Durham (RDU)?

Both of these are excellent and very logical answers given AA's hubs of the day. Rather amazingly though, neither of them is the correct answer. Please, guess again! :D

25- I can’t recall exactly when they set it up or how long it lasted, but I know AA had a “hublet” of sorts for their Caribbean services (which I do remember included long flights on ATR-72 turboprops to Barbados (BGI)) at San Juan (SJU)

if this guess turns out to be incorrect, it’ll be time to start randomly working my way thru AA’s destinations along the Atlantic seaboard :/

jlemon Jul 27, 19 10:50 am


Originally Posted by jrl767 (Post 31348261)

25- I can’t recall exactly when they set it up or how long it lasted, but I know AA had a “hublet” of sorts for their Caribbean services (which I do remember included long flights on ATR-72 turboprops to Barbados (BGI)) at San Juan (SJU)......



Well.....I think SJU was more than just a "hublet" for AA....it was actually quite an operation when one considers that in the summer of 2001 American and TWA (which was in the process of being merged into AA) were operating nonstop flights with mainline jet equipment from San Juan to AUA, BDL, BOS, BWI, CCS, DFW, EWR, FLL, IAD, JFK, LAX, MCO, MIA, ORD, PHL, SDQ, STL, STT, SXM and TPA. In addition, at the same time, SJU-based Executive Airlines was operating American Eagle service with ATR-42 and ATR-72 aircraft to a number of other destinations in the Caribbean region that could not support mainline jet service or simply did not have an airfield large enough for jets. American was operating Airbus A300-600R as well as Boeing 727-200, 737-800, and 757-200 service while TWA was operating B757-200 and MD-80 service into SJU during the summer of 2001.

We connected through San Juan via AA many times over the years during our various sailing adventures in the Caribbean and I miss their SJU hub as do our friends who still live in Puerto Rico. It was a sad day when American ceased hub operations at San Juan in favor of building up their Miami hub.

Seat 2A Jul 27, 19 11:33 am


Originally Posted by jlemon (Post 31348169)
22. (1982) In 1982, only one airline operated a turboprop nonstop from the U.S. mainland to the far reaches (over 1000 miles from the U.S. mainland) of the West Indies. The flight operated twice weekly and continued on to another island where it overnighted before returning to the U.S. the next day. Identify the airline, the U.S. gateway airport, the two destination airports and the aircraft type.

So....we are looking for an airfield not too far from SXM that could handle an Electra. We know the airport in question was located closer to St. Maarten than Antigua. Anguilla? Nope. And certainly not St. Barts or Statia. So let's go with St. Kitts.

jlemon, You Da Man!! St. Kitts it is. Here's the outbound schedule:

Sunjet International Airlines FE 801 Miami (MIA) 130p-615p St. Maarten (SXM) 645p-710p St. Kitts (SKB) Lockheed Electra Wed Sat



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