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Old Timer's Airline Quiz and Discussion.

Old Timer's Airline Quiz and Discussion.

Old Apr 9, 2024, 8:21 am
  #29146  
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Originally Posted by Seat 2A
This sounds like United and the 777. I don't know exactly when the order was placed, but given the 1995 introduction into revenue service with not one but three introductory flights by UA, the timing seems right.
I worked in 777 Customer Engineering from April 1991 to October 1992; Boeing formally launched the program in October 1990

the first jet off the line, N777UA, operated the official inaugural flight (UA921, LHR-IAD) on 7 Jun 1995; the other flights were ORD-LHR and IAD-ORD

we happened to be traveling SEA-ORD-BDL that day, and walked by the departure gate for the LHR flight a couple hours before departure; staff were in the process of decorating the gate area

on our return trip a week later we were on N777UA ORD-DEN accelerated along 32L for a few seconds, then turned off into the penalty box; tried again maybe 10 minutes later with the same result, returning to the gate for maintenance to do whatever they needed to do in the lower avionics bay; finally took off about 2.5 hours late

UA had rebooked us on the 0645 DEN-SEA; given that there werent yet any hotels near the new DEN, and that we had our four-year-old son with us, the agent at DEN was more than willing to put us on the 1100 flight
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Old Apr 10, 2024, 3:32 pm
  #29147  
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Originally Posted by Seat 2A
8. In the 1980s, this airline made headlines by becoming the launch customer for a groundbreaking aircraft known for its advanced composite materials and efficient design. Name the airline and the aircraft.

This sounds like United and the 777. I don't know exactly when the order was placed, but given the 1995 introduction into revenue service with not one but three introductory flights by UA, the timing seems right.
For this one, the intended answer (which I just checked myself for the first time like I'm doing with most of these questions) was launched into commercial service during the 1980s. The question might be a little misleading because, while the airline/airplane did make a lot of headlines shortly after the launch, the primary focus of most of these was not advanced composite materials or efficient design (the articles did mention these topics, though). Anyway, I'm giving the incorrect label to the 777 because even though its design was more advanced and it probably used better composites, 1995 is definitely too late for this party..
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Old Apr 10, 2024, 3:57 pm
  #29148  
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Originally Posted by moondog
12. Also during the same period, I flew between HYA and BOS every other weekend until my parents deemed I was old enough to take the bus instead. These flights were on 2 different airlines onboard 7 different a/c types. Several of the a/c types were common between these airlines, but in the case of the HYA-BOS route at the time, we’re looking for a 2 + 5 split. Please identify the airlines and the airplanes.
ANSWERED (Air New England: 1. Twin Otter, 2. FH-227; PBA: 3. DC3, 4. YS11, 5. Martin 4-0-4, 6. EMB-110 Bandeirante; 7. Cessna 402)
I just happened to stumble upon some of my PBA swag in a scrapbook today, including the following 5 postcards (which, cover the planes listed above). I will note that there was allegedly a 6th postcard in the set though, maybe a Beech 99?




And, while I'm here, I want to share with you this Gull Air ad clipping that was in the same envelope as the PBA postcards.


I don't think I had a chance to fly Gull Air (must have been mostly focused on ACK and MVY), but I found their planes to be much more aesthetically pleasing than those of most other airlines.

Last edited by moondog; Apr 10, 2024 at 4:07 pm
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Old Apr 10, 2024, 5:26 pm
  #29149  
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8. Air France and the A-320 given the FBW avionics.
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Old Apr 11, 2024, 10:59 pm
  #29150  
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Originally Posted by Seat 2A
8. In the 1980s, this airline made headlines by becoming the launch customer for a groundbreaking aircraft known for its advanced composite materials and efficient design. Name the airline and the aircraft.

This sounds like United and the 777. I don't know exactly when the order was placed, but given the 1995 introduction into revenue service with not one but three introductory flights by UA, the timing seems right.
Originally Posted by jrl767
I worked in 777 Customer Engineering from April 1991 to October 1992; Boeing formally launched the program in October 1990

the first jet off the line, N777UA, operated the “official” inaugural flight (UA921, LHR-IAD) on 7 Jun 1995; the other flights were ORD-LHR and IAD-ORD

we happened to be traveling SEA-ORD-BDL that day, and walked by the departure gate for the LHR flight a couple hours before departure; staff were in the process of decorating the gate area

on our return trip a week later we were on N777UA ORD-DEN — accelerated along 32L for a few seconds, then turned off into the penalty box; tried again maybe 10 minutes later with the same result, returning to the gate for maintenance to do whatever they needed to do in the lower avionics bay; finally took off about 2.5 hours late

UA had rebooked us on the 0645 DEN-SEA; given that there weren’t yet any hotels near the new DEN, and that we had our four-year-old son with us, the agent at DEN was more than willing to put us on the 1100 flight
Originally Posted by moondog
For this one, the intended answer (which I just checked myself for the first time like I'm doing with most of these questions) was launched into commercial service during the 1980s. The question might be a little misleading because, while the airline/airplane did make a lot of headlines shortly after the launch, the primary focus of most of these was not advanced composite materials or efficient design (the articles did mention these topics, though). Anyway, I'm giving the incorrect label to the 777 because even though its design was more advanced and it probably used better composites, 1995 is definitely too late for this party..
Originally Posted by YVR Cockroach
8. Air France and the A-320 given the FBW avionics.
Yes, the A320 was/is the intended correct answer, and it received a lot more press than we normally hear about new airplane launches due to the crash at the 1988 Habsheim Air Show.

But, before I mark this question as complete, I was wondering if jrl767 or anyone else wants to try to make a case for the 757/767.

ETA: By shear coincidence, a Mayday video on the 1988 A320 incident just popped up on my youtube feed:


Last edited by moondog; Apr 12, 2024 at 9:22 am
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Old Apr 12, 2024, 7:50 pm
  #29151  
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Originally Posted by moondog
Yes, the A320 was/is the intended correct answer, and it received a lot more press than we normally hear about new airplane launches due to the crash
A320 launch occurred quite a few years prior (looks like it was 40 years ago, March 1984) to the crash when the a/c was in service already? At any rate, I wasn't confident of the answer as I don't remember the A320 as being particularly rich in composite technology. The biggie, IIRC, was FBW, and of course it could use bigger engines than the 737 (which of course haunts Boeing to this day) and could use bins instead of loading bags one at a time.

Last edited by YVR Cockroach; Apr 12, 2024 at 7:59 pm
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Old Apr 12, 2024, 7:59 pm
  #29152  
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Originally Posted by YVR Cockroach
A320 launch occurred quite a few years prior to the crash when the a/c was in service already?
​​​​​​The first revenue flight was on 4/8/88 and the airshow crash happened two months later (6/26).
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Old Apr 16, 2024, 4:02 pm
  #29153  
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Originally Posted by moondog
3. During World War II, this airline played a significant role in ferrying military aircraft and personnel. What was the name of the airline, and which routes did it operate during this period?
3- among U.S. carriers this was Pan Am; they operated services with Boeing 314 flying boats to Lisbon via the Azores, as well as a route via Brazil to west Africa (Dakar?)

paging WHBM for more details here: I believe BOAC was also involved in transatlantic services, mainly with flights from the United Kingdom to Canada and New York; the purpose of these operations was to return the crews who had ferried B-17s, B-24s, C-47s, and other military aircraft from the U.S. over to England to support wartime operations
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Old Apr 17, 2024, 10:06 am
  #29154  
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3. During World War II, this airline played a significant role in ferrying military aircraft and personnel. What was the name of the airline, and which routes did it operate during this period?
Originally Posted by jrl767
3- among U.S. carriers this was Pan Am; they operated services with Boeing 314 flying boats to Lisbon via the Azores, as well as a route via Brazil to west Africa (Dakar?)

paging WHBM for more details here: I believe BOAC was also involved in transatlantic services, mainly with flights from the United Kingdom to Canada and New York; the purpose of these operations was to return the crews who had ferried B-17s, B-24s, C-47s, and other military aircraft from the U.S. over to England to support wartime operations

Pan Am is an acceptable answer and so is BOAC because the question didn't limit the scope to US-based airlines.

Nonetheless, the intended answer is a US carrier other than Pan Am. In addition to Transatlantic and Transpacific routes, this airline's military-related mission consisted of connecting military bases with production facilities.
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Old Apr 17, 2024, 10:09 am
  #29155  
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Originally posted in #29096

Most recent update before trimming #29113

---

3. During World War II, this airline played a significant role in ferrying military aircraft and personnel. What was the name of the airline, and which routes did it operate during this period?

Pan Am and BOAC are acceptable answers, but were looking for another US-based airline. Discussion starts in post 29153.

6. What was the significance of the 1930 Air Mail Act in the United States, and how did it impact the development of commercial aviation?
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Old Apr 17, 2024, 12:43 pm
  #29156  
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3. There's always TWA as a backup..
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Old Apr 17, 2024, 1:17 pm
  #29157  
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Originally Posted by moondog
... the intended answer is a US carrier other than Pan Am. In addition to Transatlantic and Transpacific routes, this airline's military-related mission consisted of connecting military bases with production facilities.
American Overseas Airlines is the only U.S. carrier that comes to mind as having scheduled TATL operations in this time period
Originally Posted by YVR Cockroach
3. There's always TWA as a backup..
American, Northwest, and United were also extant in the 1940s; none of those four had yet begun TATL or TPAC services, but I suspect all (and perhaps AOA as well) provided crews to ferry newly built aircraft to stateside and overseas operational bases
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Old Apr 17, 2024, 3:03 pm
  #29158  
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Originally Posted by moondog
3. During World War II, this airline played a significant role in ferrying military aircraft and personnel. What was the name of the airline, and which routes did it operate during this period?
Originally Posted by jrl767
3- among U.S. carriers this was Pan Am; they operated services with Boeing 314 flying boats to Lisbon via the Azores, as well as a route via Brazil to west Africa (Dakar?)
paging WHBM for more details here: I believe BOAC was also involved in transatlantic services, mainly with flights from the United Kingdom to Canada and New York; the purpose of these operations was to return the crews who had ferried B-17s, B-24s, C-47s, and other military aircraft from the U.S. over to England to support wartime operations
Originally Posted by YVR Cockroach
3. There's always TWA as a backup..
Originally Posted by jrl767
American Overseas Airlines is the only U.S. carrier that comes to mind as having scheduled TATL operations in this time period. American, Northwest, and United were also extant in the 1940s; none of those four had yet begun TATL or TPAC services, but I suspect all (and perhaps AOA as well) provided crews to ferry newly built aircraft to stateside and overseas operational bases
TWA was the intended correct answer, but I'm not convinced it is a better answer than PA, AA, or UA.

From what I've been able to gather, the ATC (Air Transport Command) sort of functioned as an airline itself during WWII, and the bulk of its fleet/resources were contributed by a variety of US airlines, including Pan Am, American, and TWA (Transcontinental at the time).

https://airandspace.si.edu/stories/e...world-war-ii-1
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Old Apr 18, 2024, 11:54 am
  #29159  
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Originally Posted by moondog
... ATC (Air Transport Command) sort of functioned as an airline itself during WWII, and the bulk of its fleet/resources were contributed by a variety of US airlines, including Pan Am, American, and TWA (Transcontinental at the time).

https://airandspace.si.edu/stories/e...world-war-ii-1
from this article, it strikes me that the ATC -- even though not an "airline" in the same sense as Pan Am, TWA, United, et al; more of a hybrid between an airline and a massive military aviation organization responsible for infrastructure as well as operations -- is probably the most accurate answer to the question

nowadays DoD has access to several hundred aircraft and crews from about 25 airlines through the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF); these supplement organic airlift requirements for both passengers and cargo, both within the U.S. and overseas
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Old Apr 21, 2024, 4:43 pm
  #29160  
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It's nice to see things percolating along so nicely here. I am back from Bali, but in the course of doing some back exercises have slipped a disc down low that's going to require a surgical intervention sooner than later, At the same time, we start recertification training down in the park soon, so I'll be juggling free time a bit. Oh - and then I'm trying to complete a trip report from my recent trip to Indonesia and back. Anyway, here's the plan -

I'm gonna bring a couple of OAG's down to the park with me, and when I have time I'll start the process of researching some new OTAQ&D queries. I don't know how soon they're gonna be able to get me in for lumbar fusion surgery, but hopefully by mid-May. I won't be working in the park in a driving capacity until I've completed sufficient re-hab and am able to pass the DOT Medical Card physical. We'll see how that all jibes with researching and/or responding to questions. At present, that is unknown.

In the meantime, although this thread has been pretty quiz-centric since its inception, the D in OTAQ&D stands for discussion. Should any of you have any thoughts on the commercial aviation scene, past or present, or maybe just want to share some memories from past flying adventures, well - here's your platform. We'd love to hear from you!

In the meantime, I'm going to leave you with a link to a fantasy trip report that I created as a result of a discussion started here at the OTAQ&D about the introduction of 'Empire class' flying boats in 1937 which allowed British Airways predecessor Imperial Airways to offer a real through-service from Southampton to the far reaches of the British Empire. The impetus was Alexander Frater's book "Beyond The Blue Horizon" in which he tried to follow the route of the 1937 flight per airline schedules and aircraft available in 1986. In my trip report, I tried to do so via schedules in a 1969 OAG.

Anyway, hope it makes for fun reading, and maybe even fodder for some extraneous commentary or your own memories from back in the day. Click the link below -

ON THE ROAD AGAIN: Strolling down memory lane between London and Sydney in 1969 - FlyerTalk Forums
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