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Whats the greatest number of Citizenships/Permanent Residencies can one have?

Whats the greatest number of Citizenships/Permanent Residencies can one have?

Old Jan 24, 11, 7:44 pm
  #16  
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
no, there is no limit. One country cannot dictate who another country can give citizenship to. I hold Canadian, American and German citizenships. The Americans say I can only have one,
Doesn't this US Department of State web page on the subject say otherwise?

Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
but really there is nothing they can do about it,
Some governments prohibit their citizens from carrying other citizenships. Presumably, they can do something about it when such a person enters some place under the jurisdiction of that government, if the government knows about the additional citizenships.
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Old Jan 24, 11, 7:45 pm
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
Northern Ireland is not the Irish Republic, it is Britain. Therefore, being born in Northern Ireland does not get you Irish citizenship as far as I know.
I'd suggest you dust off your copy of the Good Friday Agreement.
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Old Jan 24, 11, 9:18 pm
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
Northern Ireland is not the Irish Republic, it is Britain. Therefore, being born in Northern Ireland does not get you Irish citizenship as far as I know.
Besides what the poster above me stated, Northern Ireland isn't even in Britain.
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Old Jan 24, 11, 9:28 pm
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I only have dual citizenship. Born to a British mother and Norwegian father makes me have both. I think I should apply for a British passport, but my Norwegian surname with strange Norwegian letters would pose a problem I guess.
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Old Jan 24, 11, 9:32 pm
  #20  
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Originally Posted by William S View Post
I only have dual citizenship. Born to a British mother and Norwegian father makes me have both. I think I should apply for a British passport, but my Norwegian surname with strange Norwegian letters would pose a problem I guess.
No, "strange" letters will not pose a problem.
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Old Jan 25, 11, 5:30 am
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
Northern Ireland is not the Irish Republic, it is Britain. Therefore, being born in Northern Ireland does not get you Irish citizenship as far as I know.
Quite right - Northern Ireland is part of the UK now - but up until 1922 (April 20th or something like that), Ireland was all one country, so anyone born in what is now NI before that date was deemed to be an Irish citizen as well as a British one....

I can claim Irish citizenship as both my parents were born before the partition (in my mother's case apparently - the day before!!), and my English born daughter can also claim Irish citizenship through me AND her grandparents.

The dual Nationality came in very handy before the EU passports came in as I needed a passport renewed - and the UK passport office were on strike with my application stuck in the system...... I jumped on the train to Dublin and I had a nice shiny Irish passport in my paws with in 24 hours - and it came in very useful at times as quite often the queue for non-UK passports at Immigration was a lot shorter than than the UK one......

Shame we now have EU passports really ......
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Old Jan 25, 11, 6:02 am
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To those who think the US only allows one, or tolerates but does not do so willingi=ly I offer this:
Yesterday I received my Global Entry process for the US. The application asks to list all passports on has, even though as a US citizen one cannot enter the US on a non-US document. The processing officer asked about my Brazilian passport because I had shown it on the application form as required. he then said it really does not matter, but that exit processing from the US does enter the system (apparently through airline reporting, although he did not say) so they ask so that Global Entry records do not get confused with multiple entries and no exits.

People oftne assume governments object to dual citizenship despite official stements to the contrary. My experience is that the bureaucracy understands and does not diapprove.

There are a handful of countries that get uptight, but only a handful.
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Old Jan 25, 11, 8:14 am
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
Northern Ireland is not the Irish Republic, it is Britain. Therefore, being born in Northern Ireland does not get you Irish citizenship as far as I know.
So off topic, but I can't help but to clarify this...

Between 1922 and 1999 if you were born in Northern Ireland you were entitled to Irish citizenship, but did not automatically become a citizen unless one of your parents was an Irish citizen at the time of your birth.

From 1999 to 2005 if you were born in Northern Ireland you were entitled to Irish citizenship and automatically became a citizen if you were not entitled to the citizenship of any other country.

From 2005 to present if you were born in Northern Ireland you were entitled to Irish citizenship if one of your parents was an Irish or a British citizen, a legal permanent resident of either Ireland or Northern Ireland, or a legal resident of Ireland or Northern Ireland during 3 out of the 4 years preceding your birth. Also, you automatically became a citizen if you were not entitled to the citizenship of any other country.

For an entitled person to become a citizen, all that one must do is an act that only Irish citizens may do. For example, any entitled person becomes an Irish citizen if they or someone on their behalf (for children, basically) applies for an Irish passport.
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Old Jan 26, 11, 11:40 pm
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Originally Posted by CarolynUK View Post
Shame we now have EU passports really ......
But EU passports are still primarily national passports – so if you're entitled to both a British and an Irish passport you can still have both, obviously. EU countries' passports are issued in a common format (more or less), but they are issued by the national authorities to those people whom the country concerned considers to be citizens.

The situation vis ŕ vis Irish citizenship for those born in Northern Ireland is slightly complicated, as noted above, but today (putting it simply) such a person is entitled to claim Irish citizenship on the same basis as a person born in the Republic of Ireland. Of course, there is no requirement for them to do so, and they won't be regarded by Ireland as citizens unless they do something that only an Irish citizen can do. And people born in Northern Ireland have the same claims to British citizenship as people born in the rest of the United Kingdom.

Last edited by Christopher; Jan 26, 11 at 11:46 pm
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Old Jan 26, 11, 11:44 pm
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Originally Posted by pinworm View Post
no, there is no limit. One country cannot dictate who another country can give citizenship to. I hold Canadian, American and German citizenships. The Americans say I can only have one, but really there is nothing they can do about it, and they probably don't even know anyhow. I was born American in Canada, aquring both at birth. In 1995 Germany reinstated all citizenships for people and their kids displaced during the 2nd world war, which was my father, sister and self.
The US does not prohibit, or attempt to prohibit, its citizens from holding other citizenships. What it does do is insist that its citizens deal with US government authorities solely as a US citizen, and this includes using a US passport to enter the USA.

On this latter point, however, it is hardly alone –.plenty of countries insist that their citizens enter the country on that country's passport (e.g. Australia, South Africa) – although not all do (e.g. the UK, New Zealand).
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Old Jan 27, 11, 12:19 am
  #26  
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I concur, pinworm you are about 1000% wrong on this. In any case to answer to OP, most citizenship laws exist in a vacuum, so theoretically there is no limit on what can hold as long as one is not from a country which categorically prohibits duel or multiple citizenship (places such as Malaysia, China, India, Austria (with very few caveats), and certain others which come to mind. PR is a different matter as many have said as many places have physical presence requirements, so that would have to do with ones capability to manage these.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 11:59 am
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Originally Posted by Christopher View Post
But EU passports are still primarily national passports – so if you're entitled to both a British and an Irish passport you can still have both, obviously. EU countries' passports are issued in a common format (more or less), but they are issued by the national authorities to those people whom the country concerned considers to be citizens.
Another thing to note is that many countries have different entry requirements for citizens of different EU countries. For example, to visit Iran Italian citizens can get Visa on Arrival, Irish citizens can get e-visas, and British citizens must apply at a consulate/embassy.
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Old Jan 27, 11, 4:00 pm
  #28  
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Originally Posted by alanR View Post
How many citizenships can you have as a right of birth?

To start the ball rolling
I'm taking "right of birth" to mean a right conveyed via birth, whether due to lineage, place of birth or circumstances applicable at time of birth.

Perhaps 7 at least: presuming: the 4 grandparents, 2 parents, and the place of birth convey separate rights to separate citizenships as a right of birth; and none of the acquisitions of citizenship by right of birth conflict with acquisition of other citizenship(s).

It's far more difficult to find people who were born entitled to more than 4 citizenships as a right of birth than it is to find people who ended up with 5 citizenships or more.

Last edited by GUWonder; Jan 28, 11 at 2:05 am
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Old Jan 27, 11, 5:05 pm
  #29  
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Originally Posted by jbcarioca View Post

People oftne assume governments object to dual citizenship despite official stements to the contrary. My experience is that the bureaucracy understands and does not diapprove.

There are a handful of countries that get uptight, but only a handful.
It's indeed a minority but it's also more than a handful, although it seemed to have been a diminishing number for a while. Some forrmer British colonies in Africa and Asia have gotten uptight about it. Even some former Spanish colonies have gotten uptight about it. Even some places in the EU are increasingly making a stink of it.
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Old Jan 28, 11, 2:36 am
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
I'm taking "right of birth" to mean a right conveyed via birth, whether due to lineage, place of birth or circumstances applicable at time of birth.

Perhaps 7 at least: presuming: the 4 grandparents, 2 parents, and the place of birth convey separate rights to separate citizenships as a right of birth; and none of the acquisitions of citizenship by right of birth conflict with acquisition of other citizenship(s).

It's far more difficult to find people who were born entitled to more than 4 citizenships as a right of birth than it is to find people who ended up with 5 citizenships or more.
I agree that the likelihood grows smaller the larger the number is, but I do know a couple where each of them has three citizenships, none of which coincide. Four of those six total citizenships were acquired after birth (that is not from their parents). They both currently live in yet another country, so that if they have a child in that country (a jus solis country), the child has the potential for 7 nationalities. But just imagine if those two people had parents from two different countries - that would have added another two potential nationalities for 9!
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