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Any Chromebook converts?

Any Chromebook converts?

Old Aug 9, 23, 10:47 pm
  #1  
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Any Chromebook converts?

Anyone make the switch to Chromebook for either home use or even work? How has your experience been?

I just ordered this guy for home use.
https://www.lenovo.com/ca/en/p/lapto...el)/83bn0002us
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Old Aug 10, 23, 12:30 am
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I used to travel with a really cheap Chromebook--for most of the stuff I do on the road, it was totally sufficient, but the 1366x768 TN screen was a drag and it wasn't hard to overwhelm the 4GB of RAM. Now that a lot of manufacturers are making mid-level Chromebooks like the one you linked, they're great. Chrome OS requires a lot less processor power and RAM than Windows, so even seemingly crappy hardware runs quite well.

Google Docs and the Outlook web client have also gotten a lot better in the past couple years. I could never be completely without a Windows or Mac laptop, but as a travel companion Chromebooks are great.

Also great: installing Chrome OS Flex on a laptop that's starting to get old. What used to be a slowish Windows machine is now a fast Chromebook.
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Old Aug 10, 23, 12:43 am
  #3  
 
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We have a pile of ex-school Lenovo Chromebooks we issue for international travel. They leave the office factory reset & wiped clean. When the employee gets to their foreign destination, they access and execute our script and then are able to connect back to their office workstation. When they're ready to leave, the Chromebook gets wiped and factory reset.

Overall... they get the job done. As long as all you're doing is web-based, they're fine. When it comes to application support, well.. it's Android, and not all Android apps support x86 processors. Being ex-school units, they're ruggedized and very cheap, dare I say disposable. I'd imagine the experience is a bit nicer on better hardware. Very simple machines, but at the same time that's what makes them interesting. Because they're like this, they're actually decent for security. No Windows bugs to worry about, and there aren't many people trying to hack into Chromebooks compared to the number trying to get into Windows machines. It's actually kind of fun to open up dangerous attachments and bad websites and watch their scripts fail on the Chromebook.
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Old Aug 10, 23, 1:11 am
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Originally Posted by KRSW
When it comes to application support, well.. it's Android, and not all Android apps support x86 processors. Being ex-school units, they're ruggedized and very cheap, dare I say disposable. I'd imagine the experience is a bit nicer on better hardware. Very simple machines, but at the same time that's what makes them interesting. Because they're like this, they're actually decent for security. No Windows bugs to worry about, and there aren't many people trying to hack into Chromebooks compared to the number trying to get into Windows machines. It's actually kind of fun to open up dangerous attachments and bad websites and watch their scripts fail on the Chromebook.
That's one of the reasons I used mine for travel too--even if it got swiped from a hotel room in Sketchistan, no one was going to get very far with it, and none of my data was actually on the machine anyway.

Google and the OEMs talk a lot about the ability to run Android apps on Chromebooks but the only time I ever found it useful was using the Netflix app so I could download movies to watch on the plane. Otherwise, everything else I did worked far better in the browser. Chrome OS Flex doesn't support Android apps and I don't miss them.
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Old Aug 14, 23, 4:13 am
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I have a chromebook with decent specs.... but I can't see using it as my daily driver. I generally only use it when I am taking someone to a medical appointment or something where I have to wait at a nearby coffeeshop or something. I do have a few android apps installed, but if I need to get anything serious done, I need a full blown Windows/Mac box (most of my linux stuff can run in VMs).

That said, for the coffeeshop wait, they're usually not bad. For those I just need something lightweight to browse the internet and watch the occasional video (which that definitely does).
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Old Aug 14, 23, 6:21 pm
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I have used one for light duty for the last 4 years. I'm on one right now as I'm in front of the TV. I have a much more capable desktop I built myself for resource intensive things, but for basic web browsing the Chromebook works great. I do have some issues with some websites and their security causing everything to take too long, but I probably shouldn't be doing all my banking on the Chromebook. I'm on what was a mid level machine when I bought it, could probably use a new one at some point in the near future.
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Old Aug 14, 23, 7:25 pm
  #7  
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Originally Posted by theshaun
Anyone make the switch to Chromebook for either home use or even work? How has your experience been?

I just ordered this guy for home use.
https://www.lenovo.com/ca/en/p/lapto...el)/83bn0002us
Looks nice, but I couldn't use since it doesn't have a Trackpoint

I like my ancient Chromebook (with Trackpoint ) but could never use as my only machine since a) it can't run WordPerfect, and b) I still use a pop3 client to download my email (I have 19GB worth on my Windows machine going back to 2000)
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Old Aug 15, 23, 6:21 am
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Originally Posted by KRSW
We have a pile of ex-school Lenovo Chromebooks we issue for international travel. They leave the office factory reset & wiped clean. When the employee gets to their foreign destination, they access and execute our script and then are able to connect back to their office workstation. When they're ready to leave, the Chromebook gets wiped and factory reset.

Overall... they get the job done. As long as all you're doing is web-based, they're fine. When it comes to application support, well.. it's Android, and not all Android apps support x86 processors. Being ex-school units, they're ruggedized and very cheap, dare I say disposable. I'd imagine the experience is a bit nicer on better hardware. Very simple machines, but at the same time that's what makes them interesting. Because they're like this, they're actually decent for security. No Windows bugs to worry about, and there aren't many people trying to hack into Chromebooks compared to the number trying to get into Windows machines. It's actually kind of fun to open up dangerous attachments and bad websites and watch their scripts fail on the Chromebook.
Is this easy for me to set up myself?
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Old Aug 15, 23, 6:53 am
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Originally Posted by lsquare
Is this easy for me to set up myself?
I'm curious about the scripting part. Factory resetting a chromebook is easy ( https://support.google.com/chromeboo...r/183084?hl=en ) AKA power washing it. But the scripting part of it is something I haven't done before.
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Old Aug 15, 23, 3:32 pm
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All my users do is log into their Google account, go to their GDrive, then download the script and run it...which just downloads OpenVPN, installs it, installs the user's keyfile and configuration, and some other small things. Not a lot going on with it. We're just using the Chromebooks as thin clients for users to access their full-sized laptops & desktops back at the office.
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Old Aug 18, 23, 3:33 pm
  #11  
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Since my kids' school district is deep into the Google Education ecosystem, Chromebooks were a no-brainer. Back in the day, you could buy a thin & light, snappy Chromebook with 1080p for a good price. Now, for the same price, you get 14", nearly 4lbs behemoths. Now that Miss Swede is entering college, I bought her a thin and light Windows laptop. Looking forward to migrating Baby Swede to another device once she graduates.

And while not technically a Chromebook, my most-used non-phone device after my work laptop is my Samsung Galaxy Tab S7 with keyboard. It does everything I need it to do since most everything is now web/app-based.
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Old Aug 19, 23, 5:33 pm
  #12  
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I'm about a week in with the Chromebook and couldn't be happier. My at home computing needs are very basic and this machine does it all just fine and then some.
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Old Aug 19, 23, 9:57 pm
  #13  
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Well, since this is the "Travel Technology" forum I'll admit to being a Chromebook convert as I travel with a small 11.6" Asus Chromebook C201 laptop for several years now and am more than happy.

I considered a tablet but opted for this small and light enough laptop as it's easily carry in in a padded backpack pocket, inexpensive enough - sub CAD$200 - that were it lost, stolen or damaged it wouldn't break me, and allows me to surf FT & check emails while on the road which is really all I need it for.
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Old Aug 19, 23, 10:32 pm
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I recently returned from 2 weeks in Scotland and then a week in Amsterdam. I didn't want to carry my heavy work laptop and my ancient personal MBP, so I decided to try a Chromebook instead of my personal MBP. I think it's the Acer Spin C714 or something. I use Google products extensively so I wouldn't miss much.

It feels kind of cozy using it, but it wasn't perfect.

I had a lot of problems with the network stack. It would randomly not see hotel wifi, or be unable to connect to it. Sometimes it would not see my Huawei mobile hotspot. I set up a personal VPN and it was impossible to set up on the Chromebook. For a while it was crashing a lot too. I'd open the lid and it would reboot. This seems to have been resolved by an OS update.

I'll probably continue to travel with it, but with much lower expectations. It was better than carrying another Mac. If I needed any serious CPU power, I could use my work laptop.

I took too much stuff though. I also took my IPad Pro and it was too much. If Apple were to make a comfortable and study keyboard stand for IPad, I'd probably just use the IPad as my personal laptop instead of the Chromebook, since it's CPU is superior.
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Old Aug 21, 23, 2:55 pm
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I like the security angle suggested in this thread. Some countries have a reputation for swiping data at the border. With a Chromebook, you can cross with an unused second account active, resetting and activating the main account on arrival.
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