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US to Au power converter and plug adapter

US to Au power converter and plug adapter

Old Aug 18, 19, 3:19 pm
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US to Au power converter and plug adapter

Hello all,
I found something (that I think) will convert voltage. I know it'll work as a plug adapter, but can someone confirm this will work to convert voltage too? I'm traveling from the US to Australia, and a photo is below.

Thanks,
Erica



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Old Aug 18, 19, 3:24 pm
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Does it look like this Skross adapter? https://www.skross.com/en/products/w...ravel-adapters The skross doesn't convert voltage. Most non-beauty gadgets don't need voltage conversion these days (iPad charger, laptop brick). Flat irons, hair dryers, and iron/steamer might though there are travel versions which are dual voltage.

Last edited by freecia; Aug 18, 19 at 4:15 pm
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Old Aug 18, 19, 4:03 pm
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Zero chance that'll convert voltage. It's a fused plug adapter, with a 2.5 amp fuse in it. As Watts = Amps x voltage, that means it's got a different maximum watts depending on the voltage, which is why it has 2 separate entries for 110 volts and 230 volts.

The fuse is required because it supports UK sockets. For historic reasons, most UK plugs need to include a fuse in them. As the device you'll be plugging in using this adapter doesn't have a fuse, then adapter itself needs to have one.

Originally Posted by freecia View Post
Does it look like this Skross adapter?
It's definitely not a Skross. It's missing multiple of the things a Skross plug would have printed on it (starting with the brand/model, but also things like the "CE" approval markings.)
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Old Aug 18, 19, 6:48 pm
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Originally Posted by EtoileFilante View Post
I found something (that I think) will convert voltage. I know it'll work as a plug adapter, but can someone confirm this will work to convert voltage too? I'm traveling from the US to Australia, and a photo is below.

Thanks,
Erica


What electrical devices are you travelling with?
Most(all?) laptops, Ipads, phones are OK with multi voltage. Check the labels/power pack

Anything with a motor or heater, like a hair dryer, may fail with 230V 60Hz. Check the label. If it it smokes/blow fuse when turned on time to bin it. Just leave such devices at home. Anyway the less stuff you travel with the better.

A plug adaptor is what most people only need. Not a voltage power transformer.
https://whatplug.info/from/australia
question about using voltage converters (in Australia)

Last edited by Mwenenzi; Aug 18, 19 at 6:56 pm
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Old Aug 20, 19, 6:33 pm
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I would avoid something that needs a fuse. we just traveled to 4 countries with one of these. worked great.

https://www.amazon.com.au/Adapter-Un...gateway&sr=8-1
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Old Aug 20, 19, 9:18 pm
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Originally Posted by boerne View Post
I would avoid something that needs a fuse. we just traveled to 4 countries with one of these. worked great.

https://www.amazon.com.au/Adapter-Un...gateway&sr=8-1
... which has a fuse.

(And that's a good thing, because like I said above, they are required in the UK, and that adapter supports UK sockets...)
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Old Aug 20, 19, 9:24 pm
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Originally Posted by docbert View Post
(And that's a good thing, because like I said above, they are required in the UK, and that adapter supports UK sockets...)
In case you wonder why, UK domestic circuits are wired as a ring main (a naval practice) which means you can deliver more power with less wire and are typically fused at 60 amps. The plugs are designed to deliver 13 amps with ease and that is the maximum fuse allowed. They are supposed to be fused to match the load they are being used for. A plug adapter for a PC, for example, would probably not need to be fused at more than 3 amps to handle the initial inrush.
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Old Aug 21, 19, 4:35 pm
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In my little box of spare fuses, I only ever really use the 2A or 3A fuses - pretty well nothing that I would use requires more.

As to the OP, I am amazed that any consumer product is sold nowadays that isn't dual voltage - it costs next to nothing to add, whereas having to have separate versions would be far more expensive for a manufacturer.
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Old Aug 21, 19, 7:50 pm
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Originally Posted by lhrsfo View Post
I am amazed that any consumer product is sold nowadays that isn't dual voltage - it costs next to nothing to add, whereas having to have separate versions would be far more expensive for a manufacturer.
That's true for electronic devices that don't have heaters or certain types of motors. A heating device needs either a manual switch or an electronic switching system. The first solution is cheap but leaves the device vulnerable to misconfiguration that could destroy it. The second solution would be expensive. I've never seen it implemented.
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Old Sep 13, 19, 2:33 pm
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In my experience, converters don't really work very well and something always fries while using them. As has been said, laptops, phones, etc are all dual these days and no need to even flip a switch.

Most hotels have hairdryers so no need to pack one unless you have specialized hair needs since they're usually rather weak. You can find inexpensive Conair and Revlon curling irons that are dual voltage. For the past 25 years I've only bought dual-voltage appliances, so the only thing needed is a plug adapter. Sometimes you need to turn a dial from one voltage to the other but many appliances these days all you need to do is plug it in and it knows. Easier, safer, smaller, less to store and pack.
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