High Speed Router

Old Dec 9, 18, 12:54 pm
  #1  
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High Speed Router

I have bought a new home in a MetroPlaces community. https://www.metroplaces.com/my-ultrafi/

We get free internet in the house and and I am a newbie at routers. I would rather own my router than have to depend on a Spectrum provided one. I would like a good quality but don't need one for real time professional gaming stuff.

I would like one that has different channels so I can have one to the TV, lower speed for phones etc. I would like to be able to load a VPN that can only be activated on certain channels, if that makes since. Is there a modem/wireless router that will do what I want within a reasonable ( $300-400) budget. I would like something I don't have to replace for a few years.
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Old Dec 9, 18, 4:57 pm
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The speeds in those communities (especially upload) seem good enough that I'm not sure any sort of traffic shaping will add all that much. 4K video, for instance, typically clocks in at around 25 megabits per second or so depending on the service. I could be misunderstanding what you mean by "channels", however.

Additionally, given the speeds they promise, it sounds more like a FTTH offering than anything over Spectrum's existing cable network (I have Spectrum's "Gig" service, which tests at around 940mbps down and 40 up when I'm on Ethernet). If it's anything like AT&T's fiber service, you may not be able to opt out of using their equipment; you should be able to put their router in bridge mode and use whatever you want behind it, though.

Anyway, I'd probably make sure that whatever router you buy at least supports 802.11ac Wave 2 (which should be a given these days, but you never know). Possibly 802.11ax/WiFi 6 if you don't want to have to worry about it for a while, though I'm not sure the current offerings are anywhere near your budget.

EDIT: I forgot to add that I currently use a Ubiquiti Edgerouter Lite + UniFi AP-HD combo at home but that's definitely not for those who don't have some IT experience. The setup does perform well though and I typically get 600-700mbps on speed tests when close to the access point.
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Old Dec 10, 18, 7:40 am
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Originally Posted by MoreMilesPlease View Post
I would like one that has different channels so I can have one to the TV, lower speed for phones etc. I would like to be able to load a VPN that can only be activated on certain channels, if that makes since. Is there a modem/wireless router that will do what I want within a reasonable ( $300-400) budget. I would like something I don't have to replace for a few years.
Actually, this doesn't make much sense. When you say "channels", are you referring to wireless frequency channels? From the context I think you just mean certain devices get certain levels of service, but it's such an odd use of the word "channels" that I wonder what you intend. I agree that speeds of 100+ Mbps won't require much in the way of QoS for a household.

If you have no IT expertise and aren't interested in learning, avoid Ubiquiti and Mikrotik. Instead, your best bet will probably be to just go to a big box store and buy a router whose box announces it can achieve the speeds you need. Note that wifi is largely black magic and there are a lot of interconnected requirements to get those speeds. Think of what the box says as a theoretical maximum that doesn't necessarily reflect what you'd get in the real world. It depends on the wifi access point, yes, but also on your device you are connecting to it, what other devices are connected to it, distance, interference levels from a thousand different things, and others. If you require full line speed, plugging in to ethernet is the only easy way to get there.

Else, if you don't want a big box mass market router, check out AmpliFi (Ubiquiti's consumer offering) or the Google home wifi system.
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Old Dec 10, 18, 9:11 am
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Originally Posted by gfunkdave View Post
If you have no IT expertise and aren't interested in learning, avoid Ubiquiti and Mikrotik. Instead, your best bet will probably be to just go to a big box store and buy a router whose box announces it can achieve the speeds you need. Note that wifi is largely black magic and there are a lot of interconnected requirements to get those speeds. Think of what the box says as a theoretical maximum that doesn't necessarily reflect what you'd get in the real world. It depends on the wifi access point, yes, but also on your device you are connecting to it, what other devices are connected to it, distance, interference levels from a thousand different things, and others. If you require full line speed, plugging in to ethernet is the only easy way to get there.
Router marketing is...creative, to say the least. Not to mention that you can really only expect 50% or so of what transit rate your device actually negotiates with the router. With a good router, though, that might very well give you acceptable performance.
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Old Dec 20, 18, 6:48 pm
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FWIW, I "do this stuff for a living" yet decided on the Google WiFi (with the pucks in wired-mesh mode via MoCA 2.0 adapters) behind a DOCSIS 3.1 modem on an Xfinity GB plan and it works well enough for me. It can now punch IPv6 holes in the firewall now, the last piece of the puzzle I'd wanted.
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