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Wireless Noise Cancelling: Sennheiser PXC-550 vs. Sony MDR1000X

Wireless Noise Cancelling: Sennheiser PXC-550 vs. Sony MDR1000X

Old Nov 2, 2016, 6:54 am
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Wireless Noise Cancelling: Sennheiser PXC-550 vs. Sony MDR1000X

Overview
Ratings in parentheses on a 1 (worst) to 10 (best) scale for each. SY=Sony; SH=Sennheiser. Opinions are of course just my own subjective judgment. I used no actual measurement tools beside my own hands and ears.
  • Noise Cancelling: Even. (SY: 9 | SH: 9)
    Each set gets a slight edge in different situations. NC performance is indistinguishable with music on.
    .
  • Sound Quality (music/movies): Slight edge to Sennheiser. (SY: 8 | SH: 9)
    Both are very good, and better than Bose. Sennheiser has ability to tweak EQ via app.
    .
  • Call Quality: Edge to Sennheiser. (SY: 7 | SH: 8)
    Clarity is acceptable/very good on both, but noise management slightly better on Sennheiser. Sony is missing a mute function.
    .
  • Build Quality: Edge to Sony. (SY: 9 | SH: 7)
    Feels more solid, fewer exposed innards.
    .
  • Comfort/Weight: Edge to Sennheiser. (SY: 8 | SH: 9)
    Slightly less weight and earpads more "cushy." YMMV based on ear size and head shape.
    .
  • Ambient Noise Management: Big edge to Sony. (SY: 10 | SH: 6)
    More modes and ability to pass through ambient noise while still playing media/calls. Sennheiser is all or nothing, either/or mode only.
    .
  • Additional Features/Quirks: Even. (N/A)
    Depends on what's important to you. See detailed notes.
    .
  • Appearance: Subjective, but slight edge to Sony. (SY: 9 | SH: 7)
    Sony is single color with no accents, minimal branding, and cleaner lines.
    .
  • Cases/Transport: Edge to Sony. (SY: 8 | SH: 6)
    Hard shell, symmetric case. Internal divider is more sturdy.

Overall, I ended up sticking with the Sony. But, as evidenced by my ratings, I thought both sets are very nice and both have their strengths & weaknesses. If you have use cases or priorities different from mine, the Sennheiser may very well be better suited to your needs.


FULL ON RAMBLING
So I've been musing about getting a set of over-the-ear NC headphones for a while. I prefer wireless options just because it's always been easier - have been a big fan of the Plantronics Backbeat Go 2 in the past, but the earbuds just weren't cutting it for me anymore (plus the battery life was terrible).

I tried the Bose QC35s and while I appreciated the NC effectiveness, couldn't stand the feeling of pressure in my ears or the subpar (to me) sound quality.

So I was excited when I started researching again and found two new competitors to the QC35s. Both priced at $400 USD and both with, on the surface, the same core characteristics: over-the-ear, active noise cancelling, wireless/bluetooth, built-in microphones for calling.

I purchased both over the weekend and have already taken one flight with each, using them essentially from entering airside to leaving airside. I plan to keep swapping them out in different situations where I can until I make a decision, and will update this post periodically over the next several days (so long as I remember to!).

Getting Bose out of the way:
I only really tried the QC35s for half a day before I gave up on them, so I won't go as in-depth to comparing the Sennheiser/Sony sets to the Bose. I will say that overall, Bose had slightly better noise cancelling and significantly worse sound quality than both the Sennheiser and Sony. SQ in particular is of course subjective, but it's something I care about and the Bose SQ just came across as empty and hollow - almost as if it was all mids with no strength in even moderate lows and highs. The real dealbreaker for me on the Bose was the weird pressure sensation it gave me. Again, YMMV and I've heard it doesn't affect everyone the same, but it caused me enough discomfort to not want to wear them anymore.

Adding some categories below for comparison, and I'll fill out the details as I go. If there are other categories folks would like for me to compare, just let me know! I think I have a couple weeks before I have to return one of the sets, but will hopefully make a decision sooner than that.

Note that most of the time I hate dealing with cords, so if I don't mention otherwise, assume that my comments reflect use when connected via Bluetooth and NC turned on.

Noise Cancelling:
In my opinion, both sets perform very well, with each taking a very slight edge over the other in different scenarios/preferences. I've tried both sets out on airplanes (3 hr flights), the ATL Plane Train, in airport concourses, in a parking garage with my car running and others driving by, in my house with a/c on and landscapers outside, and in a quiet room - both with music playing and music paused to evaluate *just* the NC. Again, both sets did a very good job with NC, so the differences here are pretty minor, and only stand out if you're really looking for them. Short story is that Sennheiser was better at wiping background noise away and getting closer to complete silence (though a very tiny bit of white noise is still left), but they weren't as great at passive noise isolation so some sounds did get through and were identifiable. Sony leaves you with a (very little) bit more white noise than Sennheiser, but that almost helps because non-background sounds are kind of covered up. Sony also seemed to have better passive noise isolation, which I tested out by wearing each set while turned off (or with NC deactivated, since the Sennheisers automatically turn on when you unfold them). As an example of this, I wore both sets right after one another in the air conditioning/landscaper situation - both the a/c and leafblowers went away to an almost unnoticeable hiss on both. But on the Sennheiser, I could clearly hear myself snapping my fingers and could make out the jingle of my dog's collar as she was scratching herself. On the Sony, I doubt I'd have noticed these unless I was actually listening for them. Playing music at a middle volume on either set, neither the white noise nor the snapping/dog collar could be made out at all.

Sound Quality (music):
Sennheiser wins this one for me. Great clarity at all ranges - bass gets a good thump but stays tight and compact, and highs are very crisp and bright. Vocals, which are my measure of mids, are clear and stand out without overwhelming. That's not to say that the Sony set underperforms at all. It is perfectly nice and clear, with great mids and decent highs. But the lows in the Sony come across a bit looser/muddy, and that at times overwhelms the rest of the range. They are in no way messy like most Beats sets, just ever so slightly less packaged than on the Sennheiser. Basically, the Sony seems tuned a little more heavily toward lower frequencies. And speaking of tuning, probably a big reason that the Sennheisers were so appealing to my ear was because I had the opportunity to "tune" their EQ using Sennheiser's "CapTune" app. Out of the box, they really didn't sound good at all, but 10 minutes of fiddling with the app and I was able to dial in an EQ that was perfect *for me* - and really, if you're buying a $400 pair of headphones, you really should be spending 10 minutes getting them set up the way you want. Apparently there's also a button on the Sennheiser that triggers different listening modes so you can customize all of those ("Club" vs "Movie" vs "Director" or something), but I didn't find a need for that and honsetly the button just got in the way. If Sony has a similar way to customize the EQ for their set, I haven't found it, but would love that ability as I'm sure I could then get the Sony to sound as good as the Sennheiser. As it stands, though, my evaluation is on the final capabilities of each set, and so that lack of customization leaves Sony at a disadvantage. As an aside, I think both sets blow Bose out of the water without question, and the only real reason I can make a distinction between the Sony and Sennheiser is because I was listening to both sets back-to-back - on their own, both are perfectly capable cans and of course some personal preferences and music types may work a lot better with the natural range/EQ of the Sony set.

Sound Quality (movies):
This is a wash for me. Probably 80% of my use will be for music while working/reading, but I did my part and loaded up some Netflix videos on my phone to try out both, as well as a couple Youtube videos and the CNET reviews for both headphones. Dialogue came through nice and clear and I got focused enough on the content of the videos that I forgot I was supposed to be paying attention to sound quality. At that point, it became a non-issue for me.

Call Quality:
Sennheiser works much, much better as a headset for phone calls. While on both sets I could hear pretty clearly and the person on the other end said they could hear me fine, Mrs. Lee commented while I was using the Sennheiser set that it sounded even better than if I were just talking straight into the phone (this was in a hotel room with the window a/c unit about 6 feet away from me running). I also did a couple calls to an echo service while swapping out the two sets, and the Sennheiser was noticeably better. A particular calling feature that the Sony is missing is the ability to mute a call from the headset itself. On the Sennheiser, you just swipe back to mute, and swipe forward to unmute. On the Sony, there simply isn't an option. You must mute from your phone/computer. If you don't plan to make lots of calls, it's not a huge deal. But I can see myself using these around my home office to seamlessly go from music to conference calls and back, and it's noticeably missing. The Sennheiser set also seemed to do a better job at isolating my voice from other noise around me - if I dropped a pen on my desk or rolled my office chair around, the Sennheiser would just "ignore" those sounds, even while picking up my voice at the same time. If I wasn't talking, I'd get silence back from the echo service. The Sony, on the other hand, would pick up those noises regardless of whether or not I was talking. I just looked at the two boxes and apparently the Sony uses 2 mics for while the Sennheiser uses 4 mics - this probably explains the difference in capabilities for both NC and call quality. Personally, I don't care how its done, I just care what the result is, and however the Sennheiser is set up simply seems to work a little better in these two areas.
UPDATE: The SQ for phone calls may have been a bit skewed based on the echo call test I did. I later left a voicemail for myself swapping off between both headsets and then speaking directly into my phone's speakerphone. The Sennheiser was still ever-so-slightly better, but the Sony was still quite clear and perfectly understandable. Both headsets sounded better than my phones speaker function, which picked up much more of the outside world. The missing mute function on the Sony is still a bit annoying, though.

Build Quality:
Perhaps due to their weight and slightly increased bulk, the Sony just feels better built. That's not to say that the Sennheiser feels weak by any means, but even over just a few days I've found myself feeling like I have to handle the Sennheiser more delicately than the Sony. This might be fine if you just plan to use them around an office, but if you're slinging them around on the road, I'm not sure that's something I want on my mind. Also, the parts and aesthetic of the Sony is that everything fits into place along side the next part, whereas the Sennheiser just doesn't have that look. But from a "solid" feeling perspective, this also contributes to the Sony feeling better. Finally, when I was taking a close look at the Sennheiser, I noticed the underside of the arch part that goes to the hinge of each can was hollow (I don't know a better word to use), and the wiring going to the cans was simply covered up by hot glue. I'm sure this is perfectly secure and fine, but by comparison that same part on the Sony, where the same wiring must have been running to go to the cans, is solid plastic with nothing exposed.

Comfort (incl. weight):
Sennheiser by a hair. The set is noticeably lighter, the tension in the headband squeezes my head more lightly, and the pads are softer and a bit wider, meaning less pressure on the side of my head. The Sony set isn't uncomfortable at all - I wore it through a full day of work while wearing eyeglasses and had no issues at all. The pads are soft enough but a little more firm, as is the "grip" that the band puts on your head. The biggest thing is the weight - the Sony set is I think about 1 oz. heavier, but it is a noticeable difference when switching between the two. Again, likely something you might not notice at all if you were not doing back-to-back swaps between the two sets to compare them directly. Neither set made my ears sweat that much, even during brisk walks through the airport terminal or sitting in a hot plane waiting for the APU to start up - more importantly, I didn't notice any heat difference between the two. Even though Sennheiser gets the edge here, I haven't been noticeably uncomfortable with either set and have been perfectly fine wearing both for several hours at a time. I've also successfully fallen asleep while wearing both sets on an airplane.

Ambient Noise Management:
I have enough to say here to make it its own section. AND I'm even going to use more than one paragraph. Sue me.
On the Sennheiser, you can get ambient noise pumped in by double-tapping the touchpad, but doing so pauses the music track you're listening to. And you can't use that function at all (as far as I can tell) while on a phone call, as it will just end the call. The Sennheiser allegedly has an "adaptive NC" mode where it'll adjust based on your environment, but in my experience there wasn't a huge difference between this setting and just turning "full" NC on. The ambient noise modes and NC control are where the Sony really shines over the Sennheiser and becomes a much more versatile set, and the fact that the entire rest of this section is about Ambient Noise modes on the Sony are your first evidence of that.

There are a few different ways to control NC/ambient on the Sony. You can place your palm over the entire touchpad, which lowers the volume on whatever you're listening to and pipes in all ambient sound around you. This basically feels like you've taken the headset off altogether, except that you can still hear your music in the background and any voices coming your way actually sound clearer. For a less temporary ambient mode, you can also mash the Ambient Sound button on the set which toggles through two modes - Ambient Normal and Ambient Voice. Ambient Normal will leave your music playing at full volume, but add to it all of the ambient noise around you (similar to the palm thing, but with music at full volume). Ambient Voice leaves music at full volume, continues to cancel out "murmur" noise in the environment, but then identifies and passes-through any ambient sounds similar to a human voice.

Ambient Voice probably sounds like crazy voodoo magic, and it is. And it works surprisingly well in very specific situations. I left this mode on during the first half of a flight, and while the NC continued to wash away most of the engine noise and far-away voices, I could very easily hear PA announcements from the flight deck and FAs right on top of my music. I could also hear the guy next to me when he tried to talk to me, but I could not quite make out the conversation of the couple behind me, nor could I hear the soft-spoken FA offering me a drink. I was able to hear the FA and the couple when I did the palm thing, but perhaps that was because doing so also turned down the volume of my music. Using the same mode in an airport terminal, it did an okay job of separating out PA/gate announcements above the general din, but they didn't pop out as much as they did on the plane, I'm guessing because it's harder to distinguish voices from airport murmer than it is to distinguish voices from engine noise. Either way, I found this to really be an excellent feature that let me listen to music and wipe away most background annoyance while still being attentive to announcements and information. It's not perfect, and there were times I couldn't figure out what an announcement was, but I could always hear enough to at least recognize when I needed to pay attention to something.

The TL;DR version of all this is that Sennheiser only has one way to let in ambient noise, and you have to stop your music to use it, at which point you might as well just take off the headphones. Sony, on the other hand, provides three different ways to let in the outside world, while also leaving your music playing, and all are easily accessible with quick gestures or direct button-presses. For me, this means I can simply just do more with the Sony.

Features/Quirks:
Both sets have NFC, touchpad controls, etc....so I'm only going to talk about the differences here.
  • As mentioned earlier, the Sennheiser has slightly better touch controls when it comes to phone calls, with the inclusion of a mute function. The Sony touch controls work just fine and are basically the same (aside from the missing mute), and I didn't have any problems with touch controls on either.
  • The companion CapTune app for Sennheiser alllows for a great deal of sound customization and even the tweaking of different sound modes that can be accessed by the one physical button on the set. The Sony on the other hand has no such customization, though holding down the NC button for a few seconds plays a fun set of calibration sounds that essentially scans your head and optimizes the way the NC is processed - I used this feature numerous times and was surprised to find that it actually made a huge difference, especially if you switch from wearing glasses to not wearing glasses.
  • The Sennheiser comes with a somewhat thorough operating manual if that's important to you, wheras the Sony just has one of those fold-out sheets and then you figure the rest out for yourself. I'm sure there's some online guidance somewhere...I've figured out most functions just by Googling them.
  • The Sony uses a standard 3.5mm jack if you want to plug it in. The Sennheiser uses the smaller 2.5mm jack, which could be annoying. However, the included cord for the Sennheiser has an in-line mic with a call button. Haven't figured out if that means it can be used when the battery is dead.
  • Speaking of batteries, Sony advertises 20hr life and Sennheiser advertises 30hr life. I didn't have the opportunity to test out those limits, and I don't really plan to have that opportunity in my ordinary usage, so even if that 10hr difference is true, it doesn't matter to me. Both sets charge with a standard micro USB cable and drew power just fine from my laptop, inflight power, and basically any USB brick I could get my hands on.
  • Power switch - the Sennheiser doesn't have one. It just turns on when you unfold it - kind of cool, but it's not like I'm sitting here turning my heaphones on and off all the time. The Sony has a normal power switch that does exactly what you expect it to do. Both sets have a nice voice that tells you when they're turned on or turned off. Insert joke here about spouses/partners telling you when they're turned on.
  • Sennheiser provides a 2 year warranty. Sony only provides 1 year. For the price, both of these had better last a helluva lot longer than 2 years.
  • Both sets list a bunch of acronyms and fun words on their packaging. Sony: SenseEngine, LDAC, DSEE HX, HiRes Audio, S-Master HX, aptX. Sennheiser: aptX CSR, NoiseGard, VoiceMax, Beamforming Array. I don't know what half of these mean - if they made a difference for me, you'll see the result in other parts of this post.
  • Apparently the Sony set uses Bluetooth 4.1 while Sennheiser uses 4.2. I assume the higher number is better, but I didn't have any problems connecting either set to my phone, tablet, or laptop. If the Sony was coming up short of something as a result of Bluetooth version, I didn't notice it.
  • If you need your cans to be connected to two devices at the same time, you'll need to go with Sennheiser. I was able to connect them to both my laptop and phone at the same time, and while I didn't try playing music from both at the same time, I was able to receive a phone call while streaming Pandora on my laptop - quick pause on Pandora and off to the phone call I went. By comparison, the Sony wouldn't connect to my phone at all while connected to my laptop. I had to either turn laptop bluetooth off altogether, or disconnect the device manually (a few more clicks through sound settings). I can see this being a hassle since I also use a bluetooth mouse when on the road. Then again, I make more calls on Skype and WebEx than I do on my phone, so...we'll see. When I'm just moving around and my laptop is turned off, the Sony does automatically default back to my phone. Allegedly (per the Sony manual), you CAN connect to multiple devices if you set it up so one device is connected via A2DP and the other via HFP/HSP, but that seems like a lot of work since I have use cases for both profiles on both devices.
  • Sennheiser has a thing in the app you can toggle that automagically pauses your music when you take the headphones off. It works, but can get overzealous. With this feature activated, I found my music occasionally pausing itself when I was just shuffling around in an airplane seat trying to find my seat belt or getting something out of my bag.

Appearance:
I'd be comfortable wearing both around an office. The Sony is all black with minimal branding, and the outside of the cans has kind of a leather look. They way it's built, it looks more like one solid piece at all times vs. the Sennheiser. The Sennheiser has some silver accents and is overall more matte looking, but still quite sleek. The Sony appears, to me, slightly more "chunky" than the Sennheiser, but it's really a pretty small difference. Extending the Sennheiser reveals more silver that "pops" out from the black around it, whereas extending the Sony just reveals a continuation of the headband that is almost unnoticeable. This is really a toss-up: My ideal appearance would be the the shape and size of the Sennheiser but the colors (or lack thereof) and lines of the Sony. This is of course one of the most subjective items on the list.

Cases:
Sure, these don't matter as much, but it's worth noting that the Sony comes with a hard-shell case and the Sennheiser has this weird, kind of solid, but then meshy around the sides case. Sennheiser case has a pocket on the inside to store a cord and airplane adapter. Sony has a pocket inside for the airplane adapter, then a mesh pocket on the outside for a cord (which I don't like as it tends to snag when you're stuffing the thing inside a bag - would have rather just had the pocket on the inside). Both cases have a felt divider thing to keep the cans from rubbing against each other, but the Sony's is stiff vs. a flimsy/floppy one in the Sennheiser case that makes it get in the way more than it's helpful. Overall, I like the Sony case better.

Verdict:
I'm still deciding here. The Sennheiser has noticeably better call and music quality for sure, and they are a tad bit more comfortable. The noise canceling performance is well beyond acceptable on both, and despite some extra white noise, the better passive isolation and the fact that I'd rarely be in a situation to notice the white noise gives Sony an edge there. Most importantly, the feature set of the Sony, especially those ambient noise modes, goes a long, long way. Thinking about it from the "would I miss this" perspective, slightly lower (but still very good) sound quality will still get me through the day, but the binary of just completely not having access to a feature is an entirely different equation. Despite the slight weight and comfort sacrifice, I plan to travel with these and use them a lot, and the Sony feels better built for that...but it has a shorter warranty period. Jury is still out...

UPDATE: I'm going to stick with the Sony set. There are lots of pros and cons to both, and they're both really, really nice headphones. While the SQ on the Sennheiser is a little bit better to my ears, the Sony is still really, really good, and both are way ahead of Bose. NC abilities of both are essentially the same in actual use. What put me over the edge is the huge (to me) feature-set advantage that the Sony brings to the table re: ambient/passthrough sound, as well as a noticeably better build quality. When I really think about it, I'm just going to use the features on the Sony more than I'll notice the minimal difference in sound quality, and they also feel like they're going to last a bit longer than the Sennheisers. I've also just found myself using the Sony set more over the past week, even though I've been carrying both.
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Last edited by gooselee; Nov 9, 2016 at 10:31 am Reason: Adding a summary
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Old Nov 3, 2016, 5:03 pm
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For anyone following this that cares, adding a new post to bump it up as I've made quite a few edits/additions since the original starter post.

Still undecided, but leaning ever so slightly toward the Sony set. Basic rationale is that the NC and sound/call quality, while short of the Sennheiser, are still perfectly adequate, and the added ambient sound feature set really is that nice and I find myself using it a lot.

I am a little concerned about long-term comfort as well as the inability to mute phone calls from the headset.
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Old Nov 3, 2016, 6:09 pm
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Head-fi.org is a better place to get opinion for headphone related stuff.
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Old Nov 3, 2016, 6:24 pm
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Originally Posted by Vaucluse
Head-fi.org is a better place to get opinion for headphone related stuff.
I don't disagree. But I don't feel like keeping track of another forum for the one headphone purchase I make every 3-4 years, and I feel like many FTers likely have a similar use case to mine and might benefit from reading.

Honestly, this started mostly because I wanted to write down thoughts for my own decision, and I figured I might as well share back with a community where I've gotten plenty of great advice in the past.
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 9:55 am
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Final post/update - I've decided to stick with the Sony MDR-1000X over the Sennheiser PXC-550. Rationale above, but basically the Sony had more in features and build quality than what I felt I'd miss in sound quality differences to the Sennheiser. For me, these headphones are going to be workhorses out in everyday life, not finely tuned studio or living room sets, so the features and build take priority.

Hopefully this proves helpful to someone at some point. If not, it was at least a nice/fun way for me to collect my own thoughts and make a decision!
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 12:40 pm
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Originally Posted by gooselee
Hopefully this proves helpful to someone at some point. If not, it was at least a nice/fun way for me to collect my own thoughts and make a decision!
Bose reigns supreme among FT'er
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 12:45 pm
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Originally Posted by Vaucluse
Bose reigns supreme among FT'er
Thanks for your input. I guess I'll just delete this thread then.
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 12:49 pm
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Originally Posted by gooselee
Thanks for your input. I guess I'll just delete this thread then.
You should search around how FT'er regard Bose here. IMHO, No high no low = bose. I wish people do research like you prior spending any money on bose product.
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 1:07 pm
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Originally Posted by Vaucluse
You should search around how FT'er regard Bose here. IMHO, No high no low = bose. I wish people do research like you prior spending any money on bose product.
I have. My search actually started in the QC35 thread, which is where I actually learned about the new Sony set, and a couple others that I just didn't consider based on some other non-FT reviews.

Apologies for the earlier snark. I (improperly) interpreted your previous reply as dismissive exactly for that same reason - so many people around here go straight for Bose without actually looking around at other options, while I personally haven't ever found a Bose product I've really liked (though I do tend to at least give them a shot when something new comes out).
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 1:49 pm
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It depends on your objective. I have Bose for travel due to their superior NC and because they're more comfortable than other NC's I've tried. And I have Sennheisers at home for "music appreciation." Bose are popular on FT solely because their NC ability is so good.
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 3:52 pm
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Originally Posted by KCZ
It depends on your objective. I have Bose for travel due to their superior NC and because they're more comfortable than other NC's I've tried. And I have Sennheisers at home for "music appreciation." Bose are popular on FT solely because their NC ability is so good.
I agree that generally, and especially in the past, Bose NC has been better than their competitors. But with some of the more recent additions to the market, I think Bose is riding a bit on its reputation. Both the sets I tried out here were very competitive with Bose in the NC arena, and the PXC 550 was I thought actually much more comfortable than the QC35.

The other thing I noticed was that Bose had a definite advantage of NC on airplanes (so, makes sense for FT), but the Sony and Sennheiser sets were not shabby at all, and IMO they both outperformed Bose in other environments like the airport terminal and my office. I almost wonder if Bose specifically tunes their headsets to target jet engine noise where other sets are more general in their application (no evidence for this other than my internal musings, of course).

And at the end of the day, quite a bit about audio gear is subjective. I don't begrudge anyone for going with Bose if that's their preference, but I do think there are plenty of folks who haven't even tried out anything else on the market.
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 4:04 pm
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Thanks for posting such an extensive review. I will admit that my attention span did not let me read every word but I think people will find it very useful. I agree that Bose does not do sound quality as well as I would like but as someone else mentioned...NC is mainly what I have my earbuds for.

While I appreciate the info on the units you reviewed, I am done with over the ear headphones as I dont like carrying them around and I find sleeping easier with my QC20's.
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Old Nov 5, 2016, 4:10 pm
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Originally Posted by mcgahat
Thanks for posting such an extensive review. I will admit that my attention span did not let me read every word but I think people will find it very useful. I agree that Bose does not do sound quality as well as I would like but as someone else mentioned...NC is mainly what I have my earbuds for.

While I appreciate the info on the units you reviewed, I am done with over the ear headphones as I dont like carrying them around and I find sleeping easier with my QC20's.
You're welcome! If I get around to it I may try to do some kind of summary at some point. And absolutely, everyone has their own preferences and priorities - to each their own!
gooselee is offline  
Old Nov 5, 2016, 7:17 pm
  #14  
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 53
I home/road tested the QC35s, the Sony MDR1000x, and a pair of B&W wireless P7s which I only got because the Sony's hadn't been release yet.

After using noise cancelling for 4 years, I've given it up because the B&W sound so damn good which is ultimately much more immersive for me than either the Bose, Sony's or Senns.

Given these P7s, I'm not sure I'll ever compromise with a noise cancelling set again.
GrussGott is offline  
Old Nov 9, 2016, 8:21 am
  #15  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Mid Atlantic US
Programs: Hilton: Diamond/Everything else: Kettle...
Posts: 107
Thanks for the review. I have a pair of Bost QCs from several years ago - got them for points on a business credit card account being closed (better than nothing for the points which would disappear...). The QCs are starting to physically wear out, so I guess it's time to start shopping again...
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