Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Travel Technology
Reload this Page >

Adobe InDesign And Photoshop - Valuable Skills?

Adobe InDesign And Photoshop - Valuable Skills?

Old Aug 5, 13, 1:38 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New England
Programs: AA
Posts: 4,444
Adobe InDesign And Photoshop - Valuable Skills?

How much value is there to learning programs such as Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Illustrator, etc.? Are these programs that every college student should learn, or are they so specialized that they are only useful to designers? If you were outfitting a college computer lab, would you invest in this software, or leave it to the specialized labs?

**Mods - if you think this is more appropriate to Omni than Travel Tech please move. Thanks!**
Cloudship is offline  
Old Aug 5, 13, 7:25 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: San Jose CA
Posts: 1,098
Originally Posted by Cloudship View Post
Are these programs that every college student should learn?
No. Each program has a specific purpose that would suit students with different majors in different ways. An English major with InDesign skills can produce much sharper documents than someone who just knows Microsoft Word. A fine arts student using Photoshop... Well I think you get the idea.
boberonicus is offline  
Old Aug 5, 13, 8:32 pm
  #3  
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Easton, CT, USA
Programs: ua prem exec, Former hilton diamond
Posts: 31,801
I use photo shop to crop and edit pictures I put on Facebook. So it's certainly not for just designers. Is it something everybody needs to learn, probably not, but having the option for those interested or so orientated is a good option for them.
cordelli is offline  
Old Aug 6, 13, 7:07 am
  #4  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: ATL
Programs: DL Scattered Smothered Covered Medallion, Some hotel & car stuff, Kroger Plus Card
Posts: 10,572
Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
I use photo shop to crop and edit pictures I put on Facebook. So it's certainly not for just designers. Is it something everybody needs to learn, probably not, but having the option for those interested or so orientated is a good option for them.
If all you're using Photoshop for is to crop photos, that's akin to buying a smartphone because you need an alarm clock. There are many other cheap/free options out there that do the simple cropping, color correcting, basic filters, etc. and many people just go to the Adobe suite because of its name.

That said, I agree with the general response that these are very valuable skills for a specific group of professionals, myself and my wife among them. We both enjoyed having access to them during college, but it was specifically through the design programs and classes we were in.

I'd suggest that OP consult the departments/instructors that will be using the computer lab the most to see what their particular needs are, eve beyond Adobe CS. For example, if the lab will also be used by statistics classes, it may also make sense to have SPSS and STATA installed.
gooselee is offline  
Old Aug 6, 13, 7:57 am
  #5  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Denver, CO, USA
Programs: Proud Charter Member of the OUM
Posts: 23,642
Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
I use photo shop to crop and edit pictures I put on Facebook. So it's certainly not for just designers. Is it something everybody needs to learn, probably not, but having the option for those interested or so orientated is a good option for them.
Photoshop or Photoshop Elements?
DenverBrian is offline  
Old Aug 6, 13, 8:53 am
  #6  
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Easton, CT, USA
Programs: ua prem exec, Former hilton diamond
Posts: 31,801
I was wondering how long it would take for people to tell me how crazy it was to use a tool that I'm use to, have used for many years, that does exactly what I want it to do and instead use something else.
cordelli is offline  
Old Aug 6, 13, 9:20 am
  #7  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Freeload Univ. Where are you sitting?
Posts: 14,568
Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
I was wondering how long it would take for people to tell me how crazy it was to use a tool that I'm use to, have used for many years, that does exactly what I want it to do and instead use something else.
Well, at least they didn't insist you change everything to Apple.

I used to use some "lite" version of some well-known program (forget which one) that came with my scanner. I only used to to crop and maybe do a little bit of color correction. Did everything I wanted.

Lately, I picked up a copy of Corel 7, and it had a photo app, which I now use for ... cropping and a bit of color correction. One feature I like is the ability to shrink JPEGs do a size suitable for email, posting, auction sites, etc. I think I paid a buck for the software CD.

So, yes; I agree. There are lots of good programs out there for specialized applications, but those applications generally are not needed (with their wealth of features and relatively high cost) for most people. You could be looking at a significant cost for site licenses for software that is only needed for specific disciplines, not the entire student body.
BigLar is online now  
Old Aug 6, 13, 11:21 am
  #8  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: ATL
Programs: DL Scattered Smothered Covered Medallion, Some hotel & car stuff, Kroger Plus Card
Posts: 10,572
Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
I was wondering how long it would take for people to tell me how crazy it was to use a tool that I'm use to, have used for many years, that does exactly what I want it to do and instead use something else.
Sorry - I didn't mean for it to come across that way. To me, software is just a tool. If it does what you need it to and you know how to use it, great.

Perhaps similar to you, I use InDesign for work, and often use it to do things that are possible in Publisher or Word. But I'm more comfortable with InDesign and I already own it, so why not use it?

My thing was just that I wouldn't want someone to go out and BUY Photoshop if all they need to do are simpler tasks that can be accomplished through other means.

Originally Posted by BigLar View Post
Well, at least they didn't insist you change everything to Apple.
^
gooselee is offline  
Old Aug 6, 13, 12:27 pm
  #9  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: New England
Programs: AA
Posts: 4,444
There are lots of tools out there, and lots of ways to get things done. But I am more interested in giving the students the best set of skills, not necessarily how to get one project done. If you had to learn one program for photo editing, that will give you the best set of skills you could apply to whatever software package your employer uses, my initial reaction is that Photoshop would be the one to learn. But that is also because I personally am more familiar with that then say Corel. So maybe I am wrong in that? I guess that is really the question I am asking.
Cloudship is offline  
Old Aug 6, 13, 12:43 pm
  #10  
In Memoriam
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Easton, CT, USA
Programs: ua prem exec, Former hilton diamond
Posts: 31,801
According to this survey results chart from the Digital Photography School, you won't go wrong if you had to pick only one product and it was an Adobe one

cordelli is offline  
Old Aug 6, 13, 6:38 pm
  #11  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bye Delta
Programs: AA EXP, HH Diamond, IHG Plat, Hyatt Plat, SPG Gold, MR Gold, Nat'l Exec Elite, Avis Presidents Club
Posts: 15,524
Originally Posted by Cloudship View Post
How much value is there to learning programs such as Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Illustrator, etc.? Are these programs that every college student should learn, or are they so specialized that they are only useful to designers?
Agree with others, these skills are very important for those in certain lines of work, but not so much beyond that. If you're preparing for a career in finance, economics, programming, etc., there are probably better uses of your time.

Originally Posted by Cloudship View Post
If you were outfitting a college computer lab, would you invest in this software, or leave it to the specialized labs?
Definitely specialized labs, unless you are operating under a concurrent use license. Keep in mind other technology is typically required by serious users of these software packages - higher CPU, GPU, and RAM specs, monitors with more accurate color reproduction (i.e. IPS panels as opposed to the TN panels found in most monitors), etc.
javabytes is offline  
Old Aug 8, 13, 6:48 am
  #12  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Baltimore, MD USA
Programs: Southwest Rapid Rewards. Tha... that's about it.
Posts: 4,130
If I were outfitting a general computer lab, I'd stick to the basics of hardware and software that are most common today: 3/4 Windows, 1/4 Mac. Well, maybe 4/5 Windows and 1/5 Mac :-D

MS Office Professional, Adobe Acrobat, Adobe Photoshop Elements for document production and photo cataloging/manipulation; Roxio and Nero for CD/DVD burning; MS, Norton, McCaffee and Kaspersky for antivirus and security; MalwareBytes Anti-Malware, Spybot Search and Destroy, and WebRoot Spysweeper for removing adware/spyware; Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, and Opera browsers; Outlook Express, Outlook, and Thunderbird email clients. Everyone who works in an office environment will encounter this software at some point in their career.

Full-on Photoshop, and Lightroom, are pretty powerful and complex software packages. They should be in the specialty computer labs for the graphic-related disciplines, but having a few licenses available in the general computer lab would be helpful for those times when the specialty labs are full, and for those students who want to learn them even if their major is not graphic-related. It is common for many offices to have a computer set aside as the "graphics station", where pics are downloaded, documents are scanned, and Photoshop work is done. Sometimes these also incorporate CD/DVD burning, rather than having burners distributed all over the office.

If you work in any sort of office, the odds are that at some point in your career there will be a mountain of paper records that need to be scanned, touched-up, catalogued, and stored digitally. Any computer lab should be equipped with one or more document scanners. Offices typically use network-attached office copiers for that task, but smaller offices can also have average AIO printer/copier/fax machines, or desktop document scanners like the Fujitsu ScanSnap or one of those Neat Desk scanners you see advertized on TV. Along with that hardware, you should also have a site license of Adobe Acrobat (Not just Reader!) to facilitate document management. A few offices use specialty software like Paperport, but Acrobat is almost universal.

Any generic computer lab should also have multiple digital cameras, from the point and shoot variety up to a basic SLR, and the cables and memory card readers needed to support them. Graphic designers aren't the only folks who need to take pics of their projects - anyone in any occupation will occasionally need to take pics of a finished project, a potential project, or a company party or awards ceremony. I find it amusing that, given the proliferation of digital cameras today, how few college educated people have even the foggiest notion of how to get a picture off the camera and onto the computer using a USB cable or media card reader.

Generic computer labs should be equipped with a variety of output devices, too. Businesses today use everything from the sub-$100 inkjet printer from Office Depot, to older laserjet printer, to modern network-attached office copiers, in both color and black and white. Dealing with paper reloading, paper jams, and replacing ink or toner catridges, is a way of life in offices. And again, most college-educated professionals are woefully ignorant of how to do these common tasks.

You should also coordinate closely with the various department heads to have instruction on using this stuff incorporated into their various programs. It might require offering additional courses on basic tasks like scanning a document and emailing it to someone, or downloading a pic from a digital camera, or printing a document and clearing a paper jam, but these are all necessary skills that every graduate should have before they put on the cap and gown - and surprisingly few of them do.
WillCAD is offline  
Old Aug 8, 13, 7:42 am
  #13  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: DCA/IAD
Programs: most of them
Posts: 3,254
These programs are very powerful. They are also rather complex. And if you don't need or use them all the time I'm not sure how much sense it is to learn them all. They all have their specialized/specific uses that largely do not overlap. Photoshop for photos, Dreamweaver for web design, etc.
glennaa11 is offline  
Old Aug 8, 13, 9:37 am
  #14  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Freeload Univ. Where are you sitting?
Posts: 14,568
Originally Posted by WillCAD View Post
If I were outfitting a general computer lab, I'd stick to the basics of hardware and software that are most common today: 3/4 Windows, 1/4 Mac. Well, maybe 4/5 Windows and 1/5 Mac :-D

etc.
^ What he said.
BigLar is online now  
Old Aug 9, 13, 5:44 am
  #15  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Newport Beach, California, USA
Posts: 36,062
I have a somewhat different perspective. I'm a lawyer (I know everyone is shocked and never suspected ). These are programs that I have for hobbies, etc., but of which I have made fairly extensive use in my practice:

Adobe Photoshop CS6
Adobe Premiere CS4
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Audition CS4 and CS6

These are just the "artsy" programs in my arsenal; I use a lot of other stuff in my practice as well.

The point is, you'd be surprised what skills come in handy in ostensibly unrelated professions.
PTravel is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search Engine: