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How do sign into my Bank and other financial sites when traveling????

How do sign into my Bank and other financial sites when traveling????

Old Aug 2, 12, 2:50 pm
  #1  
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How do sign into my Bank and other financial sites when traveling????

Starting to travel a great deal. Some of it overseas. How do I keep my financial data safe if I have to sign into bank websites from Wi-Fi connections at hotels and airports? How do I protect my data and passwords?
Thanks
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Old Aug 2, 12, 3:11 pm
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Originally Posted by jgirvine:19048840
Starting to travel a great deal. Some of it overseas. How do I keep my financial data safe if I have to sign into bank websites from Wi-Fi connections at hotels and airports? How do I protect my data and passwords?
Thanks
This does not answer your question - but to have a greater level of security don't use public wifi. In many places you can get a local data SIM. Use this SIM with your tablet or with your phone. If you need computer access, create a hotspot using your SIM equipped tablet or phone. If you do not have a tablet or phone that is carrier and SIM unlocked you can have it unlocked by the carrier under certain circumstances. If you do not have a GSM phone, buy one UNLOCKED, but make sure it is data capable and preferably can generate a hotspot. If you are traveling to areas that do not use GSM, then you will need other solutions.
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Old Aug 2, 12, 3:22 pm
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Proxy server.
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Old Aug 2, 12, 3:27 pm
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The truth of the matter is that, if you want to be absolutely sure your information isn't compromised, you shouldn't.

That having been said, I wrote about this and related topics recently and my article might be helpful. See Risky Business Travel: How to Protect Your Trade Secrets and Information Overseas

Tom Lehrer gave travelers some advice in his song “Pollution,” advising “just two things of which you must be aware: don’t drink the water and don’t breath the air.”

What M.H., a former intelligence official currently employed in the private sector, does when he travels makes Lehrer’s advice seem quaint.

M.H., who asked that we refer to him by initials that are not actually his because of the sensitivity of his position, does not take his regular laptop or smartphone with him on trips. Instead, he takes a “loaner” device that has none of his files or passwords on it.

“In some countries, it’s almost a guarantee that your devices will be virtually or logically attacked,” he told us. As a result, M.H. simply doesn’t bring any technology with him that he can’t afford to have compromised.<SNIP>
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Old Aug 2, 12, 3:43 pm
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Originally Posted by jspira View Post
The truth of the matter is that, if you want to be absolutely sure your information isn't compromised, you shouldn't.

That having been said, I wrote about this and related topics recently and my article might be helpful. See Risky Business Travel: How to Protect Your Trade Secrets and Information Overseas
Great article and very depressing on getting any work done.....
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Old Aug 2, 12, 4:42 pm
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Total protection is not guaranteed as long as you are on the Internet. For me, I do it via my phone, of while tethered to my laptop. Again not totally foolproof, but better than public WiFi.
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Old Aug 2, 12, 5:02 pm
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As said before nothing is totally secure, but your best bet would be to set up a VPN (virtual private network) server at home or sign up for a commercial service. What the VPN does is encrypt all traffic between your computer and the server which offers the same protection as if you were banking from home.

Try searching this forum for VPN as there are many previous threads.
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Old Aug 2, 12, 5:28 pm
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Take advantage of any extra security features your bank or whoever may offer. Things like only allowing logging from recognized devices (unless they authenticate it with a text message or e-mail code), one time use passwords, etc. Make sure to change your password on a very regular basis just in case, and have alerts set for your accounts in case there is any unusual activity.

Much of what you would need to log in for (depending on the bank) can be scheduled or be handled by signing up for their alerts, the less you log in to the bank for example, the safer you are.
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Old Aug 2, 12, 6:25 pm
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For banks, why not just rely on HTTPS, which all medium to large banks now use? As long as you're not accepting any unknown certificates provided by man in the middle attacks, what's a likely public WiFi attack vector? Shoulder surfing? And VPN is overkill here. After all, do you follow your waiter into the back room to make sure she doesn't write down your name / credit card number?
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Old Aug 2, 12, 7:47 pm
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Originally Posted by boberonicus View Post
For banks, why not just rely on HTTPS, which all medium to large banks now use? As long as you're not accepting any unknown certificates provided by man in the middle attacks, what's a likely public WiFi attack vector? Shoulder surfing? And VPN is overkill here. After all, do you follow your waiter into the back room to make sure she doesn't write down your name / credit card number?
HTTPS has been cracked/hacked for at least 2 years if not longer. Fake 'Free WiFi' spots are still pretty popular for capturing the data needed to execute the above attacks. Ever been to a starbucks and seen 4-5 starbucks SSIDs not knowing which one is legit?
VPN is never overkill when it comes to financial or personal data.
Telephone banking is good in a pinch but....
Best bet? limit your checking of bank accts whilst traveling.
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Old Aug 2, 12, 7:58 pm
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Good story about how you can be hacked on a WiFi network

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/upgrade-...182159934.html
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Old Aug 2, 12, 8:43 pm
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Originally Posted by jspira View Post
The truth of the matter is that, if you want to be absolutely sure your information isn't compromised, you shouldn't.

That having been said, I wrote about this and related topics recently and my article might be helpful. See Risky Business Travel: How to Protect Your Trade Secrets and Information Overseas
It's not even just getting hacked once you get overseas. US Customs agents (used to?) confiscate laptop computers and could basically do with them what they pleased. I remember Feingold talking about this several years back when he was still in the Senate .
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Old Aug 2, 12, 9:00 pm
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Originally Posted by Zarf4 View Post
What the VPN does is encrypt all traffic between your computer and the server which offers the same protection as if you were banking from home.
Isn't this what a secure https:// connection does?

I'm sure it would be hard to find a bank/financial site that doesn't offer a secure connection today, no?
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Old Aug 2, 12, 9:20 pm
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But fairly easy to find fake sites pretending to be a bank or financial site, just collecting credentials.
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Old Aug 2, 12, 9:40 pm
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Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
But fairly easy to find fake sites pretending to be a bank or financial site, just collecting credentials.
Does a VPN solve that problem? (Maybe that's not the post to which you were responding though.)
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