Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Travel Technology
Reload this Page >

How Annoyed Do You (or I) Have To Be

How Annoyed Do You (or I) Have To Be

Old Jan 30, 12, 10:25 am
  #16  
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Programs: EZ Pass, Starbucks Gold, Red Cross blood donor
Posts: 4,728
three occasions that I can remember right now...

- Pot smokers in the room next door.
- checked into a suite (complementary upgrade) and noticed that my window was right above the hotel's HVAC system. I had a room facing the same direction at that hotel on a previous occasion and knew how loud it was going to be, so went right back downstairs and asked for a new room (and got a regular room which I was very happy with).
- fleas
bitburgr is offline  
Old Jan 30, 12, 11:35 am
  #17  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Menlo Park, CA, USA
Programs: UA 1MM 0P, AA, DL, *wood, Lifetime FPC Plat., IHG, HHD
Posts: 6,489
Honestly, it doesn't take much to get me to move either on initial entry/assessment, or after staying in the room a while. Sometimes, a really stained carpet, or just crappy layout is enough to get me back down to the front desk and asking if something else is available. Sometimes, if the wireless internet is so bad I'll CERTAINLY ask to move to a room with a wired connection or better connection. Sometimes it is noise in the next room. I had once a couple next door (wait for it and get your mind out of the gutter) and both of them were pretty much deaf. Which is sad, but they had the TV on ELEVEN the entire time, every channel just constant. I'm not sure why, but once it started we just HAD to move.

You get what you ask for, if you have a room you don't like or is sub-par and don't ask to be moved, you have only yourself to blame.
nmenaker is offline  
Old Jan 31, 12, 5:47 am
  #18  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Falls Gulch VA
Posts: 207
I guess it all depends on my mood, where I am, and the likelihood of actually getting a different room that I'll consider better. I've occasionally been offered an upgraded room but at an upgraded price. I've always declined their generous offer, but if things are bad enough, I'll look for a different hotel the next day. If they aren't willing to make a customer happy, I won't give them the satisfaction of getting more money from me than what I planned to spend.
Mike Rivers is offline  
Old Jan 31, 12, 6:13 am
  #19  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: DCA
Programs: UA US CO AA DL FL
Posts: 42,365
The time to solve problems is....

At the front desk and immediately. When you check-in, checkout the services you care about, make sure they're OK and if there's a problem, change then and there (or have it fixed). It won't get better. Complaining after the fact doesn't solve the problem.

The one thing to forget about is the coffee maker. Unless it's one of the new ones which brews individual cups from an individual packet, they are rinsed by the cleaning crew, rarely run through a commercial-grade dishwasher and you are dealing with the last guy's problems.

If you want in room coffee, bring Starbucks Via and a heating coil.

Lastly, you simply have to adjust expectations. You can't expect the Four Seasons for Hilton prices.
Often1 is offline  
Old Feb 4, 12, 7:24 pm
  #20  
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: MSP
Programs: Delta/Marriott
Posts: 4
Call me a Princess.. but I routinely walk in the room and walk right back out and ask for a different room or move hotels.

I probably travel somewhere in the 150 to 200 nights a year range and I need more sleep than the average bear...and I've learned from experience to NEVER EVER stay in a room with an adjoining door - they just cannot block out sufficient noise from the neighboring room.
Before adopting a zero tolerance policy for adjoining door rooms I once heard every word of a conversation between the man in the room next to me and his wife (and it WAS his wife and I heard her name and every last detail of their lives in that call whether I wanted to or not)..and heard another man snore & cough all night. Yet another liked to sleep with ESPN on all night long.

I primarily stay in Marriott as a first choice, then Courtyards or Embassy Suites and finally a Hampton or a Hilton. I'll ask at check in (if I remember) whether it has an adjoining door or not and I always ask for non-smoking.

Just last week I walked into a Hampton and had two double beds, a tiny (not a "Suites" Hampton Inn, apparently) room and an adjoining door on a smoking floor. I walked right back down stairs. I kindly explained my request and was moved to a huge corner room suite on the non-smoking floor with no adjoining doors. Nice & quiet - slept just great.

I'm some flavor (Gold or Platinum) of elite with both Marriott and Hilton and I'm also careful to post reviews (especially positive ones) on TripAdvisor. I'm never rude about it - but I will move hotels or rooms until I'm comfortable and able to sleep.

3 things that'll make me move every time:

1. Adjoining door. I won't even finish walking into the room if I see one.
2. Room smells..or if I can smell cigarette smoke coming from any other room. I specifically ask for a non-smoking hotel/floor...I have Asthma and non-smoking accommodations are non-negotiable for me.
3. Sheets have hair on them or look unclean.

Everything else I'll usually tolerate. I'll call down and politely ask for intervention by hotel staff if there is a rowdy high school cheerleading group practicing their cheers in the hallway after midnight..but everything else I'll roll with it.
Slow draining shower/tub, streaky mirrors, slightly icky bathroom or carpets..meh, I'll live. I'll wear my shoes and not go barefoot.

Also, unless I'm at the Ritz-Carlton I remove the bed spread/decorative topper (not the duvet, just the bed spread) and toss it in a corner.
geekalicious is offline  
Old Feb 5, 12, 6:59 am
  #21  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Falls Gulch VA
Posts: 207
Originally Posted by jspira View Post
First, I'd like to ask for a link to your article on user interface where you included the faucet photo.
It's in progress. Another example of things we use all the time with controls that are sometimes unrelated to what they control are kitchen stoves. Think about it - four burners at the corners of a square and the four knobs in a vertical line along one edge. But we digress.

.
To directly answer your question, my response is "annoyed enough to know I will not sleep well or function well in the room."
That's pretty succinct. I'm a pretty sound sleeper and I don't often stay in hotels in the bustle of a city so sirens on the street all night aren't likely to bother me too much. I don't like the rumble of machinery like elevators or ice machines, and if I discover the room is adjacent to one, I'll go back and ask for another without even going in. Sometimes I can get another room, other times I can't, or they'll only offer me a smoking room (how do I know when they're just trying that to get me to stay where they put me?).

At night, I heard something cycling on and off (the room's ultra high-tech HVAC thumped when it turned cycled - and it cycled very frequently to boot). I couldn't figure it out until the next day.

It was the ice machine.

Despite the fact that the machine was behind not one but two doors, it was actually placed in a room that shared a wall with the wall my bed was against.
It's the rare desk clerk, or even bellman (something I rarely experience and really prefer to avoid) who really knows about the physical plant. Most of them don't even know where the ice machines are. You usually have to discover those things yourself when you go to the room. When I'm driving, I've taken to leaving my bags in my car, checking in, going up to the room and looking it over before coming back for my bags or asking for a different room. Hauling my stuff to the room is a more of a determent to moving than I like to admit to myself. But seeing (and hearing) big fans or compressors right outside a window usually gets me motivated. But a lot of hotels are built so there simply aren't any really quiet rooms. Those are the ones I don't return to.

The hotel immediately moved me to a similar (but slightly larger) "executive room." The bellman who helped me move was sympathetic to noise issues and detected a fan noise in the bathroom before I had a chance to look around. It was a loud noise coming from the roof (top floor of the hotel).

So he went downstairs to speak to the MOD and a third room (apparently the last available room in the hotel) was found.

It was smaller but it was quiet. Very very quiet.

The hotel comp'd one night without my asking and also (again without my asking) gave me 5000 additional points.
I like your success story. I guess they always save a "last available room in the hotel" for the guest who complains enough.
Mike Rivers is offline  
Old Feb 5, 12, 7:07 am
  #22  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Falls Gulch VA
Posts: 207
Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
At the front desk and immediately. When you check-in, checkout the services you care about, make sure they're OK and if there's a problem, change then and there (or have it fixed).
There's not a lot that bugs me that they'll know about at the desk, though there are some things I can tell before I walk in the door. Others, I can't.

The one thing to forget about is the coffee maker. Unless it's one of the new ones which brews individual cups from an individual packet, they are rinsed by the cleaning crew, rarely run through a commercial-grade dishwasher and you are dealing with the last guy's problems.

If you want in room coffee, bring Starbucks Via and a heating coil.
We had this discussion here before. I usually wash out the coffee maker before I use it. No problem there, but those cheap one-cup makers simply don't work. I always try and haven't found one that does.

Lastly, you simply have to adjust expectations. You can't expect the Four Seasons for Hilton prices.
Four Seasons suggests luxury. Hilton, or Courtyard, or Hampton, or even Comfort Inn suggests home-like functionality and that's what I expect. And I'm sure that there are some non-functional rooms at a Four Seasons, too. I've never stayed at a Four Seasons, but I found, when I was traveling on someone else's nickel and could afford Hiltons and Marriotts and Embassy Suites now and then, I found bum rooms in all of them. Sometimes I could get something better, sometimes I couldn't.
Mike Rivers is offline  
Old Feb 5, 12, 7:28 am
  #23  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Falls Gulch VA
Posts: 207
Originally Posted by geekalicious View Post
Call me a Princess.. but I routinely walk in the room and walk right back out and ask for a different room or move hotels.
Well, if you're the Princess, I'm the lowly Pawn, but I, too, expect that when I pay for a room, it will be a reasonable substitute for home for a couple of days.

I've learned from experience to NEVER EVER stay in a room with an adjoining door - they just cannot block out sufficient noise from the neighboring room.
I can dig that. It's rare that I've stayed in a room that doesn't have a door to an adjoining room. Guess they just build 'em that way, at least the brands that I can afford. I can only remember a few nights in maybe 40 years of travel where there's been too much noise from an adjacent room, but I've heard a few doozies. Usually they don't last very long, fortunately, and I can get to sleep.

Just last week I walked into a Hampton and had two double beds, a tiny (not a "Suites" Hampton Inn, apparently) room and an adjoining door on a smoking floor. I walked right back down stairs. I kindly explained my request and was moved to a huge corner room suite on the non-smoking floor with no adjoining doors. Nice & quiet - slept just great.
I'd walk out of a room like that, too, Sometimes they'll tell me when checking in, usually apologetically, that they couldn't give me non-smoking room. I assume they're thinking "Well, what's he going to do about it?" The excuse is usually something along the line that they had someone who extended their stay in a non-smoking room and that was the room that they were going to give me. At the end of a tiring day, I'm not about to start looking for another hotel. And if I ask the desk clerk to find me a non-smoking room in another hotel he's usually willing to do that, but It'll cost me more (always) and of course they won't cover the difference or negotiate their rate for me. The usual thing is "non-smoking requests are not guaranteed" unless it's a totally non-smoking hotel.

I prefer one bed to two, and usually will ask about that, reminding them of my request, but generally the bed configuration is a request that's honored unless it's a choice between non-smoking with two doubles or a smoking king. I think they recognize the priority there. But I rarely get bumped up to a premium room for the rate I'm paying, which is usually pretty low (AAA, senior, or, when I was working for the government, the government rate, which sometimes meant "the government room").

I rarely have problems with cleanliness, blood stains, bugs, or sense of security. It's really the stuff that should work but doesn't, or should be quiet but isn't.
Mike Rivers is offline  
Old Feb 5, 12, 8:40 am
  #24  
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: New York and Vienna
Programs: PA WorldPass Platinum, AA, DL, LH. GHA Black, SPG and HHonors Gold
Posts: 3,809
Originally Posted by Mike Rivers View Post
It's in progress. Another example of things we use all the time with controls that are sometimes unrelated to what they control are kitchen stoves. Think about it - four burners at the corners of a square and the four knobs in a vertical line along one edge. But we digress. .
Personally, I would not buy a stove with controls like that. Personal purchases get extensive UI review before they are made.

Of course I´ve just discovered something that makes for a poor UI in a hotel room - sharp edges. Typically a guest is only in a room for a very short while. Having furniture (such as a platform bed) that sticks out a bit and has sharp corners (same thing goes for bedside tables) is poor design in a hotel room. In one´s bedroom, one would get used to the layout and simply avoid the hazards.

Originally Posted by Mike Rivers View Post
I like your success story. I guess they always save a "last available room in the hotel" for the guest who complains enough.
My father´s hotel joke (probably attributable to someone else):
- Are there any rooms available?
Clerk: Sorry, we are full.
- Well if President <fill in blank from Nixon to Carter to Reagan etc.) were coming, would you have a room for him?
Clerk: Yes of course.
- Well, he's not coming so I'll take his room.
jspira is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread