Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Travel Products
Reload this Page > Best backpack with removable day pack

Best backpack with removable day pack

Reply

Old May 9, 11, 2:39 am
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 14
Question Best backpack with removable day pack

My son will be studying abroad in France for 5-6 weeks this summer and is looking for a decent backpack with a removable day pack that is large enough to hold a small laptop. He would check the backpack and use the day pack as his carry-on. I don't think he wants a pack with wheels, though. He's pretty low maintenance and plans to travel light. He'll be doing weekend trips, possibly staying in hostels, and he wants something that he can just strap on and go. Any recommendations on specific packs, or do you know of a good website that has great deals on quality packs?

Thanks in advance!
danacath is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 9, 11, 3:09 am
  #2
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Anwhere ex-MAN
Programs: A3 *G, BA Silver
Posts: 2,706
Eagle Creek is porbably the way to go.

Here's a 3 way bag. Wheels and Backpack on the main bag, deatachable daysack.

http://www.eaglecreek.com/bags_lugga...-Max-25-20297/
MAN Pax is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 10, 11, 10:54 am
  #3
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Wenatchee, WA
Programs: Lifetime AA Gold-1MM
Posts: 4,909
I second the Eagle Creek recommendation. I have one with a removable day pack that works great. Just be aware that when fully packed it will probably not be able to be used as carry-on luggage.
BLI-Flyer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 10, 11, 11:26 pm
  #4
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 14
Thanks for the info. DS is going to take a look at some of the Eagle Creek packs online. He'd really like to find one without the wheel mechanisms though, so that the pack doesn't weigh 10 lbs. or so when empty. Anyone else want to recommend a good pack?
danacath is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 11, 11, 11:02 am
  #5
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Anwhere ex-MAN
Programs: A3 *G, BA Silver
Posts: 2,706
Then just buy a good pack and a seperate day-pack for carry-on/daytime use.

There's probably precious little time they'll be zipped in a single unit anyway.

Have a look at the Ebags Weekender for the carry-on/weekend bag. He can then check-in any old bag to put 6 weeks worth of junk in.
MAN Pax is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 11, 11, 11:38 am
  #6
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: where the chile is hot
Programs: AA,RR,NW,Delta ,UA,CO
Posts: 26,011
Originally Posted by MAN Pax View Post
Then just buy a good pack and a seperate day-pack for carry-on/daytime use.

There's probably precious little time they'll be zipped in a single unit anyway.

Have a look at the Ebags Weekender for the carry-on/weekend bag. He can then check-in any old bag to put 6 weeks worth of junk in.
I agree. The zip-on/off daypack seems like kind of a cool idea, but in practice you rarely see the two zipped together and handled like a single bag.

I have an Eagle Creek wheeled duffel. Great bag, smallest one they make, but there's no way I could ever carry it on, way too big to fit in any hostel locker I've ever used, and it weighs 10 pounds. Strictly used for longhaul, gear-intensive travels.

If he's going to be traveling in Europe/hosteling, I'd skip the wheels too. Just get a regular travel pack (something like an Osprey Porter, designed to carry like a suitcase or a backpack). Dimensions are slightly more 'suitcase' than 'backpack' and it doesn't have a true hip belt, but I think it weighs less than four pounds and he won't be schlepping it for miles at a time anyway. Fits carry-on if he decides to go that route.

I'd suggest checking out REI (especially if you have a store near you). Then shop online and price compare for best prices.

If he thinks there is a possibility he'll shop and need extra room coming home, then pick up an inexpensive oversize zip-top tote or collapsible, stowable duffel.
chollie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 11, 11, 11:59 am
  #7
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: ORF
Programs: Amex Plat, AA, BA Silver, WN, SPG Gold, Choice Diamond, HHonors Gold, Marriott, Club Carlson Gold
Posts: 3,122
I agree with the posts that suggest taking any bag for the checked bag. If he's going to check the bag and not use it for his weekend trips, I think a bag with wheels might be useful for transport to and from the airport; I've heard, however, that wheeled bags are not great if you're using them extensively on cobblestone streets, which you're more likely to find in Europe than here.

I realize a lot of students like to carry a laptop in a small backpack, but since he still should have the option of both a carryon and a personal item, I've found this combination extremely useful for traveling:

The REI Stuff Daypack is one of those compressible packs that folds into a pocket to the size of a small hat. When unpacked, it's capable of carrying a pair of shoes up to about a size 10, enough clothes for a weekend, and a small baggie with toiletries--http://www.rei.com/product/809163/rei-stuff-travel-pack. I've stowed this bag in the smallest of overhead bins on regional jets with no issues whatsoever. Since the fabric is flexible and fairly thin, it's lightweight; for those very reasons, however, it will not be suitable for packing a laptop unless the laptop itself is in its own protective sleeve. If he doesn't need to carry anything in it on the plane, it'll pack easily into the checked bag. And he might not want to pack anything in it on the way over there so that he'll have extra room to pack mementos, souvenirs, etc. for the trip home.

I'd put the laptop in the personal item he can place under his airline seat. There are plenty of such bags that meet most definitions of a "personal item" (generally limited to 36 linear inches), but I've found this one useful: http://www.ebags.com/product/calpak/...roductid=59743. There's room for a laptop, pens, pads, etc. with a little room left over to pack a few other things (I bought this bag specifically because its dimensions allow me to put a 15-inch packing folder into one of its main pockets). I generally pack my laptop in a small sleeve that I can then carry separately when I'm on the ground and don't want to haul a briefcase-sized bag. The sleeve also offers a little extra protection for the laptop when packed.

Of course, if he's insistent on a backpack, these recommendations will miss the mark, but if he's flexible, I think he could find this combination pretty useful.
lwildernorva is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 12, 11, 10:59 am
  #8
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 14
Lots of great ideas to consider... thanks! DS will be arriving in Paris early in the A.M. and will have to haul his gear around with him while touring. He'll be doing quite a bit of walking, getting on and off trains, etc. On weekend trips it will be much of the same thing. Consequently, he thought it would be easier to keep track of his stuff if it's able to be put together in one unit, rather than juggling multiple bags. (Think "Amazing Race" participants, if you've seen the show. ) I do like the idea of taking a collapsible duffle, and we have several, but I'll probably have to talk him into it. He's really trying to pack simply and lightly.
danacath is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 12, 11, 11:53 pm
  #9
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,048
Originally Posted by chollie View Post

I have an Eagle Creek wheeled duffel. Great bag, smallest one they make, but there's no way I could ever carry it on, way too big to fit in any hostel locker I've ever used, and it weighs 10 pounds. Strictly used for longhaul, gear-intensive travels.
You must have an old EC wheeled duffel. Their Cloudstream 22" weighs just over 6lbs and none of their 22's weigh more than 8lbs.
SaigonCyclo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 13, 11, 9:40 am
  #10
Used to be '076753k'
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: YOW
Programs: AirCanada*G
Posts: 226
This canadian company makes some wicked bags - http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_d...34374302883912
colinary is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 13, 11, 10:54 am
  #11
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Programs: AGR,CO,PC,AA
Posts: 411
http://www.ospreypacks.com/Packs/Way...andBackpacking
Upstate is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 13, 11, 12:43 pm
  #12
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: where the chile is hot
Programs: AA,RR,NW,Delta ,UA,CO
Posts: 26,011
Originally Posted by danacath View Post
Lots of great ideas to consider... thanks! DS will be arriving in Paris early in the A.M. and will have to haul his gear around with him while touring. He'll be doing quite a bit of walking, getting on and off trains, etc. On weekend trips it will be much of the same thing. Consequently, he thought it would be easier to keep track of his stuff if it's able to be put together in one unit, rather than juggling multiple bags. (Think "Amazing Race" participants, if you've seen the show. ) I do like the idea of taking a collapsible duffle, and we have several, but I'll probably have to talk him into it. He's really trying to pack simply and lightly.
When he's out and about in crowds, particularly on public transportation, he needs to keep an extra close watch on that attached daypack. Quite often the daypack is where the 'goodies' are: laptop, wallet/passport, cameras, etc. It's hard enough to detect a pickpocket in a crowded situation when you're wearing a daypack; it looks even more difficult if there's a sizable main pack between your body and the daypack.
chollie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 13, 11, 12:46 pm
  #13
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: where the chile is hot
Programs: AA,RR,NW,Delta ,UA,CO
Posts: 26,011
Originally Posted by SaigonCyclo View Post
You must have an old EC wheeled duffel. Their Cloudstream 22" weighs just over 6lbs and none of their 22's weigh more than 8lbs.
A few years old, 32". Good piece of luggage, just too heavy.

Even 6-8 pounds for a carry-on bag is too much when travelling on intra-Europe/Asia carriers where the carry-on can be subject to weight restrictions. I'm always carrying books or wood or rocks, so the weight adds up quickly. Unfortunately, should problems make wheels or a proper hip belt an absolute necessity.
chollie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old May 14, 11, 6:31 pm
  #14
Original Poster
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 14
DS is reconsidering the attached day pack idea. Sounds good in theory, but there are some definite drawbacks-- pickpockets being one of them! (You and I are in agreement on that, chollie!) Today he did some shopping around town and tried out the Osprey Atmos 50. He really liked it. DH is looking online at this very moment to see what kind of deal is out there...
danacath is offline  
Reply With Quote
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 1:43 am.

Home - News - Forum - Hotel Reviews - Glossary - Contact Us - Airport Code Lookup - Terms of Use - Privacy Policy - Cookie Policy - Advertise on FlyerTalk - Archive - Top

This site is owned, operated, and maintained by Flyertalk.com. Copyright 2017 FlyerTalk.com. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.