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Lens suggestions-African Safari

Lens suggestions-African Safari

Old Sep 11, 18, 8:47 am
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Lens suggestions-African Safari

My wife and I will be travelling to Kenya/Tanzania in November. I will be taking my T3i with me. I would like suggestions as to a good lens (L glass) to rent to get good pictures. I do not want something huge. I realize this is limiting.

Also, can I get recommendations as to a reliable place to rent one of these for the 3 weeks we will be there?

Thanks in advance

Ed
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Old Sep 11, 18, 9:03 am
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Get yourself a Sigma 150-600sport and a tamron 70-200 2.8 g2 I go to Africa one or twice each year and these 2 take about 80 percent of my shots The other 20% is a 400mm 2.8 for birds etc But for general game viewing the first 2 lenses I mentioned will be great. I usually come back with 18-20,000 shots so I speak from a point of trial and error!

lensrentals.com is an excellent place to rent from. If you want to see what images look like with the above mentioned gear, I have them posted in my Safari gallery on DGcameraworks.com

Last edited by LufthansaFlyer; Sep 11, 18 at 11:43 am
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Old Sep 11, 18, 10:57 am
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With an 18mp sensor (right?) I would be less concerned about maximum focal length than I would with lens speed and focusing speed. Unless you plan to rent a billboard you can do a lot of "zooming" using a competent image processor. On my various safaris I've found that low-light performance, along with the ability to snap into focus and freeze the action, are the crucial elements. If you're doing early morning or evening game drives, lighting is all-important, as is the ability to use a shutter speed that can overcome low light and/or vibration. Managing ISO is also critical.
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Old Sep 11, 18, 1:44 pm
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Thanks. All suggestions are valued. Canon lenses?

Last edited by Vulcan; Sep 11, 18 at 3:04 pm
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Old Sep 11, 18, 2:26 pm
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Unfortunately there is no Swiss Army knife solution to this Zoom and lens speed are hard to find in one package.
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Old Sep 12, 18, 1:59 pm
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I rented the Canon 100-400 II from LensRental Camera and Photography Rentals when I was in Joburg last year. My old 60D had some focusing issues and I likely missed a few shots because of it, but it still did the job. They were reasonably priced and communication was easy before hand.
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Old Sep 19, 18, 11:45 am
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The 100-400Lii is an excellent lens. Which camera do you have ? I read about a T3i, but that is not a canon dslr.
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Old Sep 19, 18, 11:57 am
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Originally Posted by airsurfer View Post
The 100-400Lii is an excellent lens. Which camera do you have ? I read about a T3i, but that is not a canon dslr.
? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS_600D

"The Canon EOS 600D is an 18.0 megapixel digital single-lens reflex camera, released by Canon on 7 February 2011. It is known as the EOS Rebel T3i in the Americas."

I haven't made it to Africa yet but my experience from a trip to Yellowstone is that you never have enough zoom so just take along with you what you can and want and are comfortable with. I have a Canon 1Dx and Canon 7D with lenses ranging between 11 and 300mm + 1.4 extender but traveling with the 300mm and dragging the weight all the time is something to take into account.
Putting your fully loaded backpack trough the x-ray scans on airports is also an adventure
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Old Sep 19, 18, 12:42 pm
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Originally Posted by airsurfer View Post
... T3i, but that is not a canon dslr.
Yes it is.
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Old Sep 20, 18, 8:14 am
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Just as an update, I decided to go with the Canon 100-400 L

Thanks for all the suggestions.
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Old Sep 20, 18, 7:54 pm
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Originally Posted by LufthansaFlyer View Post
Get yourself a Sigma 150-600sport and a tamron 70-200 2.8 g2 I go to Africa one or twice each year and these 2 take about 80 percent of my shots The other 20% is a 400mm 2.8 for birds etc But for general game viewing the first 2 lenses I mentioned will be great. I usually come back with 18-20,000 shots so I speak from a point of trial and error!

lensrentals.com is an excellent place to rent from. If you want to see what images look like with the above mentioned gear, I have them posted in my Safari gallery on DGcameraworks.com
My wife and I go to Africa reasonably frequently and take two main bodies and that's what we shoot with (although with the Canon 70-200 2.8). It's a fantastic combination, especially if you can have two bodies running at once. Having a 2x extender to throw onto the 70-200 is a great bonus as well, when you know you need the reach. We take our third body and have it ready with something shorter, usually a 24-70 for anything that needs something shorter.

I'm usually shooting the heavy lens (150-600) and I spend a lot of time in the 500-600 range. It's worth having the extra reach.

To the OP, there isn't one size fits all, but if you can swing it I'd consider renting a second body as well.

The other thing you should think long and hard about is support. These lenses are heavy and you won't take photos if you're tired and your arms are sore. My wife hand shoots generally with the smaller lens, but I usually have a monopod on the tripod collar of the heavier lens. I don't use it all the time and you can flip it up if you don't need it, but it's a great tool.
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