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Pros & Cons on the Sony a6300 vs. Panasonic DMC FZ1000?

Pros & Cons on the Sony a6300 vs. Panasonic DMC FZ1000?

Old Feb 22, 16, 3:09 pm
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Pros & Cons on the Sony a6300 vs. Panasonic DMC FZ1000?

I have not purchased a new digital camera in years and I am in the midst of planning a trip to Machu Picchu this summer. The last one I bought was the Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ5 in 2008 and before that the Nikon Coolpix 5700 back in 2002. Therefore the time has come for me to step up to the plate and invest in a new camera.

I have compared the DSLR's vs the smaller body mirrorless models which would both use interchangeable lenses and really like what Sony has done with their alpha series. I have done some research and have narrowed the field down to the new a6300 as I don't think I will fully appreciate and utilize all of the bells and whistles on the models in their a7 series.

Many of my friends are urging me to consider a superzoom instead of a ILC. Therefore what are the pros & cons on the soon to be released Sony a6300 vs. Panasonic DMZ FZ1000 which is a superzoom with some of the best reviews for that type of camera?

Some people have warmed me that for an amateur the Sony mirrorless a6300 which was recently announced and being released next month will become an expensive undertaking when I start buying lenses for it.

All recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
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Old Feb 22, 16, 10:47 pm
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Those are both excellent cameras, but very different. The Sony has an APS-C sensor, the Panasonic a 1" sensor. You will get better image quality and low light performance with the larger, newer Sony sensor at the trade off of cost, size, weight and inconvenience when swapping out lenses. The Panasonic lens is fast for its' type, so that will somewhat mitigate low light issues.
I would need to know a number of things about your photography before I could make a recommendation. What type of pictures do you like to take? What do you do with them? Are you usually wanting more zoom or the ability to take in more of a scene? Can you carry a heavy camera bag with camera body and several lenses all day at 8000 feet? Is the camera an update for the trip and then family snapshots later, or do you want to really advance your photo skills? How much time do you have before your trip to get comfortable with your new gear? Do you care about video? Can you get to a camera store or big box store and handle both options? (The a6000 will give you a pretty good sense of the a6300 ergonomics.)

Let us know a bit more, and we can give you better recommendations. Also, at the end of the week take a look at the specs of the Nikon DL 24-500 to be released this week. I don't know the shipping date and it may or may not be better than the Panasonic, but it will be the newest 1" sensor superzoom. (Actually, as I was typing this, the specs are up online, though not on the Nikon website yet.) Check out nikonrumors.com
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Old Feb 23, 16, 9:19 am
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Wedding and portrait photog here, and I lead a local photography class. My standard advice:

- If you are planning to leave the camera on auto mode (or some variation of auto), Save the $ and get the more affordable camera.

- More times than not, the more expensive camera is better (spec wise)

- Never buy a camera without holding it in your hands.

- A camera is a tool. Expensive cameras will not result in a better photos.

- Buy the camera that gets you excited
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Old Feb 23, 16, 9:55 am
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Originally Posted by DocP View Post
Those are both excellent cameras, but very different. The Sony has an APS-C sensor, the Panasonic a 1" sensor. You will get better image quality and low light performance with the larger, newer Sony sensor at the trade off of cost, size, weight and inconvenience when swapping out lenses. The Panasonic lens is fast for its' type, so that will somewhat mitigate low light issues.
I would need to know a number of things about your photography before I could make a recommendation. What type of pictures do you like to take? What do you do with them? Are you usually wanting more zoom or the ability to take in more of a scene? Can you carry a heavy camera bag with camera body and several lenses all day at 8000 feet? Is the camera an update for the trip and then family snapshots later, or do you want to really advance your photo skills? How much time do you have before your trip to get comfortable with your new gear? Do you care about video? Can you get to a camera store or big box store and handle both options? (The a6000 will give you a pretty good sense of the a6300 ergonomics.)

Let us know a bit more, and we can give you better recommendations. Also, at the end of the week take a look at the specs of the Nikon DL 24-500 to be released this week. I don't know the shipping date and it may or may not be better than the Panasonic, but it will be the newest 1" sensor superzoom. (Actually, as I was typing this, the specs are up online, though not on the Nikon website yet.) Check out nikonrumors.com
Thanks for the feedback which is greatly appreciated.

Shooting in low light conditions would be a plus. When traveling I do a great deal of what I would describe as outdoor tourist type landscape pictures as well as closeups. However I also take a large number of family and portrait shots so I think I need both wide angle and zoom for both travel and home use.

I display my pictures in a slide show on the living room TV screen using Apple TV and I also print 5x7, 8x10, 11x14 pictures on my home Canon 6 ink printer.

I definitely would like to enhance my photo skills considering the fact that when I was a kid (many moons ago ) I used to develop and enlarge my own black & white shots at home.

Video will be somewhat of a factor as I am about to become a grandfather in August when I return from Machu Picchu and will shoot videos of the new addition.

The weight is definitely an issue and I plan to go to B&H in Manhattan and check the cameras out in person. The a6000 is being discounted pending the release of the a6300 which has some major improvements but you are correct about it having a similar size to compare. I will request that they put one of the telephoto lenses on it so I can make a good comparison to the Panasonic which weighs 1.83 lbs. and the trip is planned for the end of July so I have plenty of time to get acquainted with the camera.

I will also check out the new Nikon that is about to be released. Thanks for the suggestion.
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Old Feb 23, 16, 10:07 am
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Originally Posted by Troopers View Post
Wedding and portrait photog here, and I lead a local photography class. My standard advice:

- If you are planning to leave the camera on auto mode (or some variation of auto), Save the $ and get the more affordable camera.

- More times than not, the more expensive camera is better (spec wise)

- Never buy a camera without holding it in your hands.

- A camera is a tool. Expensive cameras will not result in a better photos.

- Buy the camera that gets you excited
I always play with the settings but I will also make use of some of the programmed shooting modes that are there already.

I totally agree about the spec vs price comment.

I would never buy a camera without holding it first.

Some tools are better than others but I know what you are saying. It is like selecting a wine. You don't have to buy the most expensive wine to drink a really good one.

You should let emotions play a role in the decision making process but you have to balance that with some common sense. Yes, if I get excited about one of the cameras I would then have to factor in the price, usage, etc. It is like buying a regular BMW vs their M series. Do you need and will you really take advantage of the extra horsepower, torque and sportier suspension?
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Old Feb 23, 16, 10:47 am
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It's a good problem to have...always fun buying a new toy.

Speaking of BMWs...last year, I was struggling between a 535, 550 and the M5. Test drove all three several times....I think I drove my salesperson crazy. Ended with a 535...it was certainly fast enough and everything I needed/wanted from a car. I didn't want to spend the extra $ on the car or insurance.
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Old Feb 23, 16, 10:51 am
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If you display on a large TV, low light noise will be an issue with the 1" sensor. Sony does sell an 18-200 lens. (FF equivalent 24-300) If the cost of an $850 lens plus the cost of the a6300 body isn't prohibitive, that could be a great travel kit with room to grow. You won't need the ability to video sports for a few years, but that feature would be nice to have as your grandchild grows. The wide to tele zoom or the two zoom kit lenses for the a6300 work out at about 1 pound heavier than the 1" superzooms. That would be a difficult trade off for me at that altitude, but YMMV.

Last edited by DocP; Feb 23, 16 at 11:15 am
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Old Feb 24, 16, 6:58 am
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Originally Posted by DocP View Post
Also, at the end of the week take a look at the specs of the Nikon DL 24-500 to be released this week. I don't know the shipping date and it may or may not be better than the Panasonic, but it will be the newest 1" sensor superzoom. (Actually, as I was typing this, the specs are up online, though not on the Nikon website yet.) Check out nikonrumors.com
The Nikon DL24-500 model is now listed on the Nikon USA site with a $999.95 price tag along with 2 other additions in this DL group.
http://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-pro...2f2.8-5.6.html
http://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-pro...ras/index.page

I have a little time and will wait for DPReview to do their report after testing it. Hopefully they will also do a side by side comparison with the Panasonic DMZ FZ1000 which is getting the best reviews (especially at its current price) in this superzoom class.
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Old Feb 24, 16, 6:59 am
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Originally Posted by DocP View Post
If you display on a large TV, low light noise will be an issue with the 1" sensor. Sony does sell an 18-200 lens. (FF equivalent 24-300) If the cost of an $850 lens plus the cost of the a6300 body isn't prohibitive, that could be a great travel kit with room to grow. You won't need the ability to video sports for a few years, but that feature would be nice to have as your grandchild grows. The wide to tele zoom or the two zoom kit lenses for the a6300 work out at about 1 pound heavier than the 1" superzooms. That would be a difficult trade off for me at that altitude, but YMMV.
Off the top of your head do you know the aperture setting on this 18-200 lens?
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Old Feb 24, 16, 1:32 pm
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It is 3.5 - 6.3 variable aperture. Check out reviews before buying. I don't own any Sony cameras, so I am not up on which lenses test well. A wide to tele zoom generally isn't as sharp at all lengths as a pair of shorter zooms. I did look at a number of systems a year ago when I finally transitioned from Nikon film DSLR's. I gave the a6000 serious consideration but finally went with the Nikon N1 J4 with the two kit zooms and the 18.5 f1.8 (fast normal lens for a 1" sensor). I tend to take most of my shots between 50-200mm (FF) and wanted the availability of smaller, lighter telephoto lenses. After a lot of research, I decided I could live with the 1" sensor compromises. The system also seemed like it would make photography fun again, and it has. I shoot a combination of travel, my dogs and the usual family graduations, etc. Between shoulder problems, age, and needing a camera I could bring on medical mission type trips where photography is a very secondary goal, I prioritized size and weight. I would not recommend buying into the N1 now, as the DL offerings seem to have put the N1 future in doubt. My friend and colleague who was also looking at the same time got the a6000 with the two kit zooms and he has been very happy. He also has a ton of legacy Canon glass that he uses with an adaptor.

The DL 24-500 has the J5 sensor, very good video and extremely fast autofocus. We will have to see the reviews to see how it compares. Delivery may be late for your trip. Amazon has a 6/30 delivery date assuming no delays.

Last edited by DocP; Feb 24, 16 at 1:39 pm
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Old Feb 24, 16, 5:48 pm
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Originally Posted by DocP View Post
If you display on a large TV, low light noise will be an issue with the 1" sensor. Sony does sell an 18-200 lens. (FF equivalent 24-300) If the cost of an $850 lens plus the cost of the a6300 body isn't prohibitive, that could be a great travel kit with room to grow. You won't need the ability to video sports for a few years, but that feature would be nice to have as your grandchild grows. The wide to tele zoom or the two zoom kit lenses for the a6300 work out at about 1 pound heavier than the 1" superzooms. That would be a difficult trade off for me at that altitude, but YMMV.
Is this the lens?
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._6_3_Zoom.html

If so I read the reviews posted and you are correct as the weight is definitely a factor. Also many are complaining it is a slow lens to focus. I have read it was made for video and not for stills.
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Old Feb 24, 16, 9:05 pm
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Yes. It seems optimized for video use.
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Old Feb 25, 16, 3:42 am
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The A6300 will certainely be a great camera but the most improvements that were done over the A6000 are linked to video shooting (especially 4K support). The A6000 is an amazing camera especially at that price point. The kit lense SEL1650 while not being amazing is extremely compact. There is also a Sony Zeiss 24-70 f/4.0 that is a great when travelling. The above mentionned 18200 is not a small lense :-) The 24-70 is obviously much shorter but the sensor of the A6000 does allow for some cropping and closeup if you are not into pixel pipping.


If you want more lenses later there are some great primes such as the 35 f/1.8 or 50 f/1.8 if you are into portraits. (not to mention the recently anounced Sigma 30 f/1.4). Depending on your future need you can either use legacy glass through adapaters or some 3rd party manual lenses such as the Samyang 12mm f/2.0.



I have been an A6000 user for over 2 years and believe it's a great camera. So far I see no reason to upgrade to the A6300.
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Old Feb 28, 16, 9:49 pm
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I take a lot of landscape and architecture photos and most of my shots are taken at around 24-35 mm full frame.

Portraits are typically taken around 85 mm.

Occasionally you might want longer focal lengths to zoom in on architectural detail, like say the gargoyles on a cathedral facade.

So I'm not sure about the need for the super zooms. You may be carrying a lot of length and weight that you're not using most of the time.

As for videos of kids, it might serve to have something you can pull out quickly for impromptu recording. Even these cameras may be too bulky to always have on hand.

Something to consider are smart phones. Image quality won't be as clean as cameras with larger sensors and larger lenses. But they're pretty good and they're stabilized, so much smoother than what you get with a camera, unless you get some stabilizing rig or steadicam.

The shortcoming is you can't zoom (or you don't want to do the digital zoom).

Maybe camcorders do 1080p60 video stabilized these days.

My iPhone also does slow mo and time lapse video pretty easily too.
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Old Feb 29, 16, 10:40 am
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Originally Posted by martin_paris View Post
The A6300 will certainely be a great camera but the most improvements that were done over the A6000 are linked to video shooting (especially 4K support). The A6000 is an amazing camera especially at that price point.
Interesting. I hadn't realized the differences were so minor (for me, since I don't shoot video with the camera). I was looking at an A6300 body as an "upgrade" to my a6000, but if that is the practical difference between them, I'll just keep my a6000 a while longer and save money towards that a7r II because I've always wanted to try a Full Frame camera.

The kit lense SEL1650 while not being amazing is extremely compact. There is also a Sony Zeiss 24-70 f/4.0 that is a great when travelling. The above mentionned 18200 is not a small lense :-) The 24-70 is obviously much shorter but the sensor of the A6000 does allow for some cropping and closeup if you are not into pixel pipping.
If you're referring to what I think you're referring to, that Zeiss is actually 16-70mm so it gives you the same range (plus 20mm more) as the kit lens with a constant f/4 and IMO it focuses faster. I have one, and it's become my "daily" lens so far. The Kit lens is sitting in the box in the closet now.

It also uses a more standard 55mm filter as opposed to the kit lens that uses these odd little 40.5mm filters that I can only seem to find online.

Granted it IS a $1000 lens, but as many of us know (but the OP may not) the glass is what matters most, or at least is far more important in general than the body. And you can find used/refurbed examples online for the 500-750 range.

If you want more lenses later there are some great primes such as the 35 f/1.8 or 50 f/1.8 if you are into portraits. (not to mention the recently anounced Sigma 30 f/1.4). Depending on your future need you can either use legacy glass through adapaters or some 3rd party manual lenses such as the Samyang 12mm f/2.0.
I typically take the following now when I go somewhere:
Sony Zeiss 16-70 f/4
Sony 20mm f/2.8

For fun, I also picked up a cheap, chinese Holga pinhole lens that so far has been fun (if you know what to expect with a Holga pinhole lens).

I too use adapters and pull out my old MInolta MD and Yashica lenses. They can be a lot of fun, and that old 50mm f/1.7 is just peachy

The $200 Sigmas (19 and 30mm) are also very nice for the money, I have both and they are far better than their price point suggests. My biggest complaint with those is that the rattle when turned off :/ but hey, for that price on a reasonably fast prime, I can't really complain.
I have been an A6000 user for over 2 years and believe it's a great camera. So far I see no reason to upgrade to the A6300.
I've had mine for about a year, and it's replaced my SLR completely at this point. It's just SO much more convenient and works better for my needs (not as bulky, heavy).

My advice is usually this:

If you think you're going to do more than just cell-phone type snapshots, get something like the a6000. Yes, you'll need to learn about lenses and their use, but you'll be able to do so much more than with a fixed lens camera and if you ultimately decide you hate it, IMO you can get more reselling down the road with a mirrorless or SLR than you ever will a fixed lens Point-And-Shoot style camera.

Beyond that, with the Panasonic, you are stuck with what you get, there's no way really to do "more" with it, whereas with something that has interchangeable lenses, the options are limited only by your imagination (and sometimes wallet).
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