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Which camera for budding photographer?

Which camera for budding photographer?

Old Jan 22, 2014, 5:23 am
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Weenie
Buying a camera is like buying a car. Everyone is different and different things are important to different people (including budget).

That said, you should purchase the Nikon D610 kit including two lenses.
Thanks for the response. That's a bit above what I can afford, but when I'm in the market for a DSLR, i'll take into consideration.
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Old Jan 23, 2014, 8:24 am
  #17  
 
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I'd definately recommend getting a micro 4/3rd's system if your thinking of eventually upgrading to a DSLR. A basic kit will cost roughly the same as the RX100 and it won't be too much bigger if you buy the small ones. You can then actually buy more lenses, learn how to use them and the more advanced DSLR features and eventually upgrade.

Then you'll still have your small m4/3rd's camera as a portable alternative to lugging around a D610 with 2 lenses.

And if you decide to never actually get into a full on DSLR, you still have a full upgrade path to more lenses and more DSLR-like m4/3rd's cameras.
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Old Jan 24, 2014, 5:44 pm
  #18  
 
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Canon SL1 with 18-55 STM. Small, light, compact, excellent sensor and IQ.
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Old Feb 12, 2018, 2:44 pm
  #19  
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It's over four years later, but wanted to say thanks again for everyone's input and advice. The RX100 I got after posting this thread has served me very well for my needs, and I'm looking forward to upgrading to the new Mark 6 whenever it's released
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Old Feb 14, 2018, 7:37 pm
  #20  
 
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Originally Posted by cardinalkid1891
It's over four years later, but wanted to say thanks again for everyone's input and advice. The RX100 I got after posting this thread has served me very well for my needs, and I'm looking forward to upgrading to the new Mark 6 whenever it's released
And in the intervening four years, I've also bought a new primary camera.

At the time of this thread, I used a Canon EOS 50D DSLR as my primary, with the SX280HS as my smaller, point-and-shoot compact.

I have since bought a
Canon Powershot SX50 HS Canon Powershot SX50 HS
, which is a bridge camera (i.e. it bridges the gap between an SLR and a P&S). It's shaped like an SLR and has essentially the same controls amd modes, but has a fixed, non-interchangable lens. This particular model has no optical viewfinder, but does have an Electronic Viewfinder (EVF), which is a small LCD inside the eyepiece, which is used just like the optical viewfinder on an SLR. I prefer a viewfinder to the LCD screen, because viewfinders are shaded against sun glare, use less battery life, and allow me to press the camera to my forehead in the traditional stance, which is more steady than holding the camera several inches in front of my face to line up a shot.

I rarely use either the DSLR or the P&S any more. The bridge cam is half the weight and less than half the size of my DSLR (which is an older model based on nearly 10-year old technology), with a much longer zoom, better low-light performance, plenty of newer software-based features, and records beautiful HD video. It also has an articulated LCD, making it easier to shoot 'remotely', i.e. away with my arms held in awkward positions like up high or down low. It's quick and easy enough to use for every day snaps, but high enough quality for great vacation or event shooting.

cardinalkid1891, it looks to me like the DSC RX-100 Mk 6 has a pop-up EVF, which you might find highly useful for the reasons I mentioned. It's in a non-traditional spot, on the left side of the camera rather than in the middle as with SLRs, and I personally hate pop-up anything (more moving parts means more potential points of failure), but the camera has impressive specs. I'm sure you'll be as happy with it as you have been with your older model.
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Old Oct 14, 2019, 4:16 am
  #21  
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Thanks so much! I'm actually in the market again and am very much considering the mark 6 for the reasons you described. The mark 1 was built like a tank and has withstood a ton of travel around the world and lots of falls
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Old Oct 18, 2019, 12:03 pm
  #22  
 
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Hello! I recommend to buy an iPhone and enjoy taking pictures.
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Old Oct 23, 2019, 2:57 pm
  #23  
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Originally Posted by jessicaDreamer
Hello! I recommend to buy an iPhone and enjoy taking pictures.
That is a VERY interesting suggestion. I started in photography with a 4x5 inch view camera which also had a medium format back. I then had a 35mm SLR (Minolta) and a lower range Leica point and shoot. When I went to digital I went with a Canon DSLR and L glass. I also played around with a 6x6 cm Yashica MAT and some Canon high end digital point and shoots. On my last few trips, it's been all iPhone or iPhone and a Canon point and shoot. | have some software that allows me to do more with it (and miss some shots as a result) under challenging light and such. But always having it at hand matters a lot. I read an article about view cameras many years ago that said that they were "good for photographing relatively slow moving objects, like mountains". They also required a lot of stuff to be carried. In addition to the camera and lenses there was the light meter, film carriers (one per piece of film), boxes of film, changing bag, focusing loupe and some other stuff, Oh, and the tripod. It's obviously different than an iPhone but the iPhone has a lot of things going for it like spontaneity and lack of intrusion as well as always being there.
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Old Oct 30, 2019, 8:34 am
  #24  
 
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Originally Posted by WillCAD
...
This particular model has no optical viewfinder, but does have an Electronic Viewfinder (EVF), which is a small LCD inside the eyepiece, which is used just like the optical viewfinder on an SLR. I prefer a viewfinder to the LCD screen, because viewfinders are shaded against sun glare, use less battery life, and allow me to press the camera to my forehead in the traditional stance, which is more steady than holding the camera several inches in front of my face to line up a shot.
...
This might be a separate topic, but I recently switched from a DSLR to a mirrorless, and I also like the EVF. With no mirror to redirect the image from the lens as in an SLR, an optical viewfinder would be standalone and slightly offset from the lens (like the P&S film cameras from 30 or so years ago), whereas the EVF shows you exactly what the sensor sees. Theres lag in processing the image but Id take that over the inaccuracy of an OVF that isnt through the lens.

And I agree on the viewfinder over the screen too.
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Old Nov 3, 2019, 10:34 am
  #25  
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Originally Posted by nar0
I'd definately recommend getting a micro 4/3rd's system if your thinking of eventually upgrading to a DSLR. A basic kit will cost roughly the same as the RX100 and it won't be too much bigger if you buy the small ones. You can then actually buy more lenses, learn how to use them and the more advanced DSLR features and eventually upgrade.

Then you'll still have your small m4/3rd's camera as a portable alternative to lugging around a D610 with 2 lenses.

And if you decide to never actually get into a full on DSLR, you still have a full upgrade path to more lenses and more DSLR-like m4/3rd's cameras.
Check out the Olympus E-M10 Mark lll, it is a fabulous m43 body with many of the features of the more expensive bodies in the m43 world.
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Old Dec 3, 2019, 11:48 am
  #26  
 
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Wondering if anyone has any experience with the Canon m200? I'm also new, and looking to transition to a next level camera from my smart phone for travel that is easy to transport (typically travel with backpack only).
Thank you!
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