Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Travel News
Reload this Page >

Popular Mechanics: NASA has a new plane design concept

Popular Mechanics: NASA has a new plane design concept

Old Sep 6, 2018, 10:34 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: New York, NY
Programs: AA Gold. UA Silver, Marriott Gold, Hilton Diamond, Hyatt (Lifetime Diamond downgraded to Explorist)
Posts: 6,776
Popular Mechanics: NASA has a new plane design concept

https://www.popularmechanics.com/fli...ocialflowFBPOP

Interesting stuff. Smaller wing engines with generators connected to power a rear electric engine to streamline wind flow.
Yoshi212 is offline  
Old Sep 9, 2018, 10:26 pm
  #2  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: San Diego, CA
Programs: GE, Marriott Platinum
Posts: 15,536
Since the back engine creates most of the thrust, are there any reliability concerns? Or would the smaller engines on the wings still be able to get the plane on the ground safely?
JDiver likes this.
tmiw is offline  
Old Sep 10, 2018, 9:51 am
  #3  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: New York, NY
Programs: AA Gold. UA Silver, Marriott Gold, Hilton Diamond, Hyatt (Lifetime Diamond downgraded to Explorist)
Posts: 6,776
A legitimate concern. I'd imagine they'd be held to a regulation that the plane would have to be able to operate and land under a 2 engine situation but takeoff might be a stretch for a requirement but probably a production mandate to satisfy clients.

Originally Posted by tmiw
Since the back engine creates most of the thrust, are there any reliability concerns? Or would the smaller engines on the wings still be able to get the plane on the ground safely?
Yoshi212 is offline  
Old Sep 10, 2018, 7:44 pm
  #4  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Pittsburgh
Programs: MR/SPG LT Titanium, AA LT PLT, UA SLV, Avis PreferredPlus
Posts: 31,088
I would assume the same requirements/design parameters about flying with one engine non-operational would hold.

In fact, designing an engine that can fly with 2/3 of the engines working would save even more weight/size than designing an engine that has to fly with 1/2 of the engines working, as they are today.
CPRich is offline  
Old Oct 22, 2018, 8:49 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brooklyn
Programs: Bolt Bus Rewards
Posts: 1,325
Originally Posted by CPRich
I would assume the same requirements/design parameters about flying with one engine non-operational would hold.

In fact, designing an engine that can fly with 2/3 of the engines working would save even more weight/size than designing an engine that has to fly with 1/2 of the engines working, as they are today.
But since the tail engine is powered by electricity generated by the wing engines, wouldn't loss of a wing engine cause the tail engine to be under-powered?
JDiver likes this.
AMflier is online now  
Old Oct 23, 2018, 9:47 am
  #6  
Moderator: American AAdvantage
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: NorCal - SMF area
Programs: AA LT Plat; HH LT Diamond, Matre-plongeur des Muccis
Posts: 62,946
STARC-ABL, "Single-aisle Turboelectric Aircraft with an Aft Boundary-Layer propulsor, sounds like pie in the sky if you look at ETOPS requirements.

I was recently on a modern cruise ship where all eight engines (propulsion and power generators) went out simultaneously for ~three hours. The emergency generator powered emergency lighting, navaids, comms, and little else. If we had been in the Greenland - Labrador crossing wed made prior, itd have been dicey.

A MIA - CDG STARC-ABL with the loss of one engine might theoretically find itself in similar circumstances., depending g on the interdependence of these dissimilar engines.
JDiver is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

This site is owned, operated, and maintained by MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Designated trademarks are the property of their respective owners.