Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Special Interest Travel > Travel with Children
Reload this Page >

1 adult, 2 kids in car seats on an Embraer ERJ-175

1 adult, 2 kids in car seats on an Embraer ERJ-175

Old Mar 1, 18, 10:57 am
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 1
Question 1 adult, 2 kids in car seats on an Embraer ERJ-175

Someone prep me on what to expect if I am flying alone with 2 kids car seats on a smaller regional jet with only 2 seats per row. My oldest is 5 yrs old, but only 33lbs/39" tall, so not big enough to be safely restrained by the lap belt and my youngest is even smaller, still rf. We are regular travelers, with compact travel seats, so I am not concerned about anything except how to position the car seats so I can use them, but so it also make sense. Not using either seat is not really an option to me. I usually specifically book us on larger jet liners to avoid this dilemma either way.
My instinct is to seat them together in a row, rf toddler in the window seat and ff 5yr old in the aisle, me sitting across the aisle, on the aisle seat.
Will the FA's let me do this? The argument against any carseat in any seat but the window is that the potential for the carseat to block exit in an emergency, but my ff travel seat is a Cosco Finale and has a 7"x12" seat base...it will not overhang the airplane seat in any direction, at all. I realize logic is lost in these situations but help me gauge my chances here.
ssaguirre is offline  
Old Mar 7, 18, 12:02 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Austin TX
Programs: Mr Swise: AAdvantage LifetimePlt/3MM, HH Dmnd, SPG Plt
Posts: 1,442
That should work. Not sure about the Finale, but the Cosco Scenera does fit on embraers. We've done it. two sceneras can nest together and be secured with a bungee cord for transporting through the terminal and onto the plane. You may be able to nest your current seats and bungee them together, too.

Try to get a bulkhead seat if you're going to rear-face your toddler. Or at least bring along a Starbucks gift card or something for the person sitting in front of the toddler, since the carseat will prevent their seat from reclining.

You can definitely have to car seats next to each other on a plane. You just have to make sure they both are in the outermost seats and not blocking any other non-carseat passengers from exiting. Your arrangement is compatible with this, so you should have no problems.
swise is offline  
Old Mar 7, 18, 12:10 pm
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Programs: DL
Posts: 126
Originally Posted by swise View Post
Try to get a bulkhead seat if you're going to rear-face your toddler. Or at least bring along a Starbucks gift card or something for the person sitting in front of the toddler, since the carseat will prevent their seat from reclining.
Or bring a seat that won't prevent other seats from reclining. Why should other passengers be inconvenienced by your choice of child restraint?
altabello is offline  
Old Mar 7, 18, 7:06 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Austin TX
Programs: Mr Swise: AAdvantage LifetimePlt/3MM, HH Dmnd, SPG Plt
Posts: 1,442
Originally Posted by altabello View Post
Or bring a seat that won't prevent other seats from reclining. Why should other passengers be inconvenienced by your choice of child restraint?
All infant car seats are rear-facing. Children are required by law to rear-face until at least age 1, and it is recommended that parents continue to rear-face their children until at least age two. FAA requirements for the use of car seats on planes are that they are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions.

So all children under the age of one traveling in a car seat on a plane will be rear-facing, as required by the FAA. And most parents with children under the age of 2 will be rear-facing, as well -- or at least they should.
swise is offline  
Old Mar 8, 18, 9:23 am
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Programs: DL
Posts: 126
Originally Posted by swise View Post
All infant car seats are rear-facing.
That's fine and should be the parents' problem, not other customers'. I didn't say not to use the rear facing seat, just to bring a seat that doesn't prohibit other seats from functioning as intended.
altabello is offline  
Old Mar 8, 18, 11:28 am
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Austin TX
Programs: Mr Swise: AAdvantage LifetimePlt/3MM, HH Dmnd, SPG Plt
Posts: 1,442
Originally Posted by altabello View Post
That's fine and should be the parents' problem, not other customers'. I didn't say not to use the rear facing seat, just to bring a seat that doesn't prohibit other seats from functioning as intended.
There is no other option for a child under age 1 that will not affect the seat in front of it. You cannot put a child under age one in a forward-facing seat. And there isn't a rear-facing seat that will not impede the recline of the seat in front of it.

All the parent can do is attempt to secure the bulkhead row, or put a family member in front of the rear-facing child's assigned seat. The latter is not an option for a parent traveling alone with two small children.

All that being said, Embraers are generally used on short hops, and, in my experience when I had a rear-facing child, passengers were very compassionate and understanding. I offered them a Starbuck's gift card for the inconvenience, and on probably 15-20 flights, only one person ever accepted it. No one ever expressed the slightest bit of displeasure or bother to us about the inconvenience. Nearly every time, people went out of their way to share that they understood the complexity of traveling with small kids, having once done it, and they usually complimented our children on their behavior during the flight. I think it helped that we took the initiative to explain our situation upfront to the passenger and offer them something for their trouble.

And, on the flip side, there are many who believe that reclining a seat is an inconvenience and annoyance to passengers behind the seat and should only be done on flights where everyone on the plane is expected to be sleeping. *shrug*

As a parent, you do what you can when you can. You try to prepare as best you can. Most people understand that it is challenging and stressful to travel with children (and also immensely rewarding), and they show compassion towards families.
swise is offline  
Old Mar 8, 18, 5:53 pm
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Programs: DL
Posts: 126
sick of entitled parents

Originally Posted by swise View Post
There is no other option for a child under age 1 that will not affect the seat in front of it. You cannot put a child under age one in a forward-facing seat. And there isn't a rear-facing seat that will not impede the recline of the seat in front of it.
That shouldn't be problem of the other passenger.

All the parent can do is attempt to secure the bulkhead row, or put a family member in front of the rear-facing child's assigned seat. The latter is not an option for a parent traveling alone with two small children.
Then don't fly on that flight, on that of plane, if you can't get the bulkhead.

All that being said, Embraers are generally used on short hops, and, in my experience when I had a rear-facing child, passengers were very compassionate and understanding. I offered them a Starbuck's gift card for the inconvenience, and on probably 15-20 flights, only one person ever accepted it. No one ever expressed the slightest bit of displeasure or bother to us about the inconvenience.
There are a lot of people that won't share their real feelings in this situation, too bad for them.

Nearly every time, people went out of their way to share that they understood the complexity of traveling with small kids, having once done it, and they usually complimented our children on their behavior during the flight. I think it helped that we took the initiative to explain our situation upfront to the passenger and offer them something for their trouble.
Good on you for offering compensation. I don't like Starbuck's, but might make a cash deal for the inconvenience, if asked nicely (not expected to agree). However, you already expected that the inconvenienced customer would accept this, without giving them the option to refuse (I'm entitled to your space b/c my kid needs it). What if the person in front has to recline to be able to sit there with a bad back? They might have picked a reclining seat on purpose. It's like with seat swapping, OK to ask, but don't expect everyone to agree to your proposal.

And, on the flip side, there are many who believe that reclining a seat is an inconvenience and annoyance to passengers behind the seat and should only be done on flights where everyone on the plane is expected to be sleeping. *shrug*
Who believes that? If the seat reclines, it's allowed to recline. If you don't want the seat in front of you to recline into your space, get the bulkhead, or fly in first.

As a parent, you do what you can when you can. You try to prepare as best you can. Most people understand that it is challenging and stressful to travel with children (and also immensely rewarding), and they show compassion towards families.
As a non-parent, I also do what I can when I can, which includes reclining. The person in front of me reclines, so I will have to as well, if I want to be able to see the IFE or use my laptop. It's nice to show compassion, and I've switched seats for families before, however, you're not advocating for compassion, but demand accommodation.
altabello is offline  
Old Mar 9, 18, 9:17 pm
  #8  

2019 Secret Santa
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 4,118
Originally Posted by altabello View Post
As a non-parent, I also do what I can when I can, which includes reclining. The person in front of me reclines, so I will have to as well, if I want to be able to see the IFE or use my laptop. It's nice to show compassion, and I've switched seats for families before, however, you're not advocating for compassion, but demand accommodation.
Red type, multiple posts of the same rant, attacking parents...

Did you realize you were posting in the TRAVEL WITH CHILDREN forum?

Being able to recline your seat is not guaranteed. There are multiple rows on some aircraft that do not recline. For example, the row directly in front of the exit rows on some aircraft will not recline.

There are a lot of reasons why people need a little extra out of life once in a while. Maybe it's being able to safely install a child safety seat on an RJ, maybe it's having someone hold a door open when you've got luggage, or a thousand other small things that make a difference to someone. You can either show a little humanity in this life, or rant about "sick of entitled parents" in a situation that ZERO impact on you.
swise likes this.
CDTraveler is offline  
Old Mar 11, 18, 10:53 pm
  #9  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: LAX
Posts: 9,182
There are smaller carseats which are less likely to interfere with reclining. There are bulkheads. You can put a family member in a seat with obstructed reclining.
Seats do not have to be installed rear facing in aircraft - typical guidance is for cars. 5 yo definitely does not require a car seat on a plane.
It is parent's responsibility to be considerate but unfortunately too many take a position that the world revolves around them.
azepine00 is offline  
Old Mar 16, 18, 12:46 am
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Austin TX
Programs: Mr Swise: AAdvantage LifetimePlt/3MM, HH Dmnd, SPG Plt
Posts: 1,442
Originally Posted by azepine00 View Post
There are smaller carseats which are less likely to interfere with reclining. There are bulkheads. You can put a family member in a seat with obstructed reclining.
Sceneras and Combi Coccoros are about the smallest RF convertible seats. They will obstruct the recline on an Embraer. I've installed a Scenera on Embraers. An infant seat will, as well, even a fairly compact one, like the smaller Snugrides.

Definitely, though, getting a bulkhead seat or putting a family member in front of the child is the best bet, but it's not always doable.

Seats do not have to be installed rear facing in aircraft - typical guidance is for cars. 5 yo definitely does not require a car seat on a plane.
It is parent's responsibility to be considerate but unfortunately too many take a position that the world revolves around them.
Infant carriers and any seat occupied by a child under age 1 can only be rear-faced. There is no other option. Infants need the seat to be reclined more than forward-facing seats do, for one. It's why seats designed for infants have a level indicator on them to make sure the seats are secured at the correct angle. Also, the guidelines for installing seats on planes are the same as those for cars, using the belt path installation method.

Perhaps a better way of looking at this is that we are revolving around the world, and we all need to hang onto each other and support each other, so that we don't get flung around too much. A little bit more of that way of thinking would go a long way, imo.
swise is offline  
Old Mar 16, 18, 12:57 am
  #11  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Austin TX
Programs: Mr Swise: AAdvantage LifetimePlt/3MM, HH Dmnd, SPG Plt
Posts: 1,442
Originally Posted by altabello View Post
As a non-parent, I also do what I can when I can, which includes reclining. The person in front of me reclines, so I will have to as well, if I want to be able to see the IFE or use my laptop. It's nice to show compassion, and I've switched seats for families before, however, you're not advocating for compassion, but demand accommodation.
You'll see in this thread (and many like it) that everyone has different ideas on whether it is okay to recline their seat whenever they'd like, or at all during short hauls.

Everything else in your post has been addressed by others. At this point it seems you're just trolling.
swise is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread