Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Special Interest Travel > Travel with Children
Reload this Page >

Opinions on sedating babies and toddler?

Opinions on sedating babies and toddler?

Old Aug 14, 17, 11:15 am
  #1  
Suspended
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Programs: Various hotel things
Posts: 17
Opinions on sedating babies and toddler?

I heard a passenger suggest to a mother once to sedate her baby to get it to sleep. She didn't take it too kindly, obviously. I'm sure there's a safe way of doing it. Should parents do it? Would you do it?
TheLeisureFlyer is offline  
Old Aug 14, 17, 3:37 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 4,102
Originally Posted by TheLeisureFlyer View Post
I heard a passenger suggest to a mother once to sedate her baby to get it to sleep. She didn't take it too kindly, obviously. I'm sure there's a safe way of doing it. Should parents do it? Would you do it?
From pediatric anesthesia guidelines:
The minor side effects of sedation include nausea, vomiting, mild allergic reactions, headache and dizziness.
The more serious adverse effects of sedative medications are slowed breathing, decrease in blood pressure or abnormal heart rate and rhythm and potentially death.
So unless you are a qualified medical professional trained in managing sedation and have access to a full resuscitation kit, no, I don't recommend sedating an infant on an airplane where you will be thousands of feet above and maybe thousands of miles away from help if something goes wrong.
CDTraveler is offline  
Old Aug 14, 17, 3:41 pm
  #3  
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: TPA/DFW
Programs: AA EXP, MB LTTE/A HH DIA, DL
Posts: 1,108
Propofol. Of course I'm kidding (or am I?).
txpenny is offline  
Old Aug 14, 17, 4:26 pm
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Programs: DL
Posts: 119
Maybe not anesthesia or actual sedation, but something like Tylenol PM for kids, that would help them sleep & lessen the pain from the ears popping? Obviously, the first flight isn't the time to experiment with this, but it could be a relief for the child itself. My parents did it to me when I first flew at the age of 2. I 'sedated' the dog for the 4th of July, cause she went nuts with the fireworks.
altabello is offline  
Old Aug 14, 17, 5:29 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 4,102
Originally Posted by altabello View Post
Maybe not anesthesia or actual sedation, but something like Tylenol PM for kids, that would help them sleep & lessen the pain from the ears popping?
An irresponsible suggestion.

From the Tylenol PM info page:
Do not use in children under 12 years of age.
One of the active ingredients in Tylenol PM is Diphenhydramine, aka Benadryl, which has a contrarian effect in many children, making them agitated and irritable rather than sedated.

Originally Posted by altabello View Post
My parents did it to me when I first flew at the age of 2.
That doesn't mean it was a good idea.

Originally Posted by altabello View Post
I 'sedated' the dog for the 4th of July, cause she went nuts with the fireworks.
Did it survive?
CDTraveler is offline  
Old Aug 14, 17, 8:00 pm
  #6  
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: NYC
Posts: 7,641
If you don't have children don't ask.
erik123 is offline  
Old Aug 14, 17, 9:41 pm
  #7  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: LAX
Posts: 9,127
Benadryl (kids) definitely helps.. some reported that it may potentially have the opposite effect in rare cases - try at home first..
obviously use common sense
altabello likes this.
azepine00 is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 2:22 am
  #8  
yno
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Programs: FB, M&M, Marriot, IHG, Club Carlson
Posts: 306
IN my opinion, simply don't!
First of all, babies don't need to be sedated, they're just baby.
Then anyway you never know how a baby would react to any product you might use.
Finally, not sure you might not get in legal troubles for drugging your kids!
yno is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 2:35 am
  #9  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: CT USA
Posts: 2,534
Bad idea
JumboJet is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 9:15 am
  #10  
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: SFO
Posts: 3,596
This has to be a troll thread.
PWMTrav is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 9:18 am
  #11  
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Out of position
Programs: Accor, IHG, LH, BAEC, DB
Posts: 266
Originally Posted by PWMTrav View Post
This has to be a troll thread.
Sad as it may be, it is an increasingly common phenomenon that parents use medicine to tranquilize their small children.
fppmongo is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 9:31 am
  #12  
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: TPA/DFW
Programs: AA EXP, MB LTTE/A HH DIA, DL
Posts: 1,108
Originally Posted by fppmongo View Post
Sad as it may be, it is an increasingly common phenomenon that parents use medicine to tranquilize their small children.
Is there data to back this up?

I could see an older generation doing this, but today's parents seem to be quite the opposite as they have access to better information.

From what I see, and this is totally non-scientific, too many parents don't care if their children are disruptive.
altabello likes this.
txpenny is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 9:53 am
  #13  
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Out of position
Programs: Accor, IHG, LH, BAEC, DB
Posts: 266
Originally Posted by txpenny View Post
Is there data to back this up?
Yes, just google it.

Regulatory agencies have looked into this issue as well. There were numerous incidents of drugged-up children (on first-gen antihistamines and such) with serious respiratory depression, some fatal.
fppmongo is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 10:24 am
  #14  
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: SFO
Posts: 3,596
Originally Posted by fppmongo View Post
Sad as it may be, it is an increasingly common phenomenon that parents use medicine to tranquilize their small children.
That's a stupid thing to do.

Originally Posted by txpenny View Post
I could see an older generation doing this, but today's parents seem to be quite the opposite as they have access to better information.
I would have thought the same - I googled it based on @fppmongo's suggestion, and it's surprisingly common. A poor decision, IMHO.

From what I see, and this is totally non-scientific, too many parents don't care if their children are disruptive.
Whether or not that's true, what's the relationship between that statement and the topic of this thread? Are you advocating medicating disruptive kids, or just making a general statement?

Originally Posted by fppmongo View Post
Yes, just google it.

Regulatory agencies have looked into this issue as well. There were numerous incidents of drugged-up children (on first-gen antihistamines and such) with serious respiratory depression, some fatal.
I was surprised to see it, but you're right. I just don't see how people think it's fine to medicate their kids for the purpose of convenience.
PWMTrav is offline  
Old Aug 15, 17, 10:24 am
  #15  
FlyerTalk Evangelist
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Chicago
Posts: 11,024
Originally Posted by fppmongo View Post
Yes, just google it.

Regulatory agencies have looked into this issue as well. There were numerous incidents of drugged-up children (on first-gen antihistamines and such) with serious respiratory depression, some fatal.
Google /= data.

Re the OP, someone (not a doctor) once suggested that we give our daughter children's Benadryl prior to a long flight (ORD-HKG). We briefly thought about it and decided not to. Seems unnecessary, and I'm not really comfortable giving medicine to our child unless it is (1) recommended by our own pediatrician; and (2) designed to make her feel better (rather than us).
rjque is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread