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Foreigner driving in Thailand using friend's car

Foreigner driving in Thailand using friend's car

Old Sep 8, 19, 1:24 am
  #16  
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An older thread... Road safety, take care

Many/most folks have dashcams, to prove who was at fault or capture police shakedowns...the stuff that gets captured is amazing.


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Old Sep 8, 19, 4:24 am
  #17  
siw
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Having travelled through a few countries in South East Asia: Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam (amazing cycling tour) I have seen many crazy situations on the roads - in my expereince Vietnam is the winner in terms of utter craziness. Singapore, Hong Kong and Xiamen Island do not count. However, for motorised transport I have always relied on public transport, taxis or an organised tour with transport/driver. This time it is only fair that I share the driving in Thailand with my Thai friend using their car.

There are many countries that blame foreigners 100% for an accident on the basis that if the foreigner was not in the country then the accident would not have happened, irrespective if the local was at cause. That's not an attitude we can apply here in the UK as far as I know, but I've fortunately never had a road accident here.

The main issue that I see before my trip is car insurance cover. If I were to get a hire car then the car insurance (policy coverage choices) would be part of the cost. Perhaps, I can get some cover by telephoning the company I bought my annual travel insurance from.
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Old Sep 8, 19, 5:35 am
  #18  
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Originally Posted by siw View Post
This time it is only fair that I share the driving in Thailand with my Thai friend using their car.

The main issue that I see before my trip is car insurance cover. If I were to get a hire car then the car insurance (policy coverage choices) would be part of the cost. Perhaps, I can get some cover by telephoning the company I bought my annual travel insurance from.

How many Km do you plan on traveling in total? Over how many days? Unless your friend dislikes driving I'm not getting the need to share? In fact, it might be a detriment, not a benefit. Your friend is accustomed to driving here, you are not. Maybe you could wash the car? Pay for gas? Deal with maintenance and repair?

And what forms of accidents are you looking to insure? Automobile? Personal/medical? If the former, your friend has insurance. If the latter be aware that some insurance may not cover you if you are in an accident here.
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Old Sep 8, 19, 6:54 am
  #19  
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We want to visit Khao Yai National Park for a few days and maybe go to Hua Hin for the beach. We stay in Nonthaburi so these are not long drives about 3 hrs in each direction, unlike e.g. Bangkok to Chaing Mai, but it would be nice to share the driving. Also, if I could do that then I can drive there on future visits. Furthemore, I would like to re-visit Indonesia and drive there to see places and I expect Indonesia to be worse than Thailand for foreigners to drive in.

I already have annual travel insurance (for medical etc.) but this does not cover me for driving someone elses car.
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Old Sep 8, 19, 8:06 pm
  #20  
 
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I have driven from BKK to Khao Yai and to be honest on the highway it is not a bad drive. Yes inside BKK it was not so easy but if you stick to your lane and be careful it is OK. Please always expect the unexpected. Yes Vietnam is worse.
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Old Sep 8, 19, 8:29 pm
  #21  
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Originally Posted by manymany View Post
As a lot of Thai law, it is open to interpretation especially after being translated to English.
The single most important principle of Thai law. And the interpretation of the police officer standing before you is the only one that matters, whether it's consistent with the requirements of the law or not.
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Old Sep 9, 19, 5:55 pm
  #22  
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Originally Posted by siw View Post
We want to visit Khao Yai National Park for a few days and maybe go to Hua Hin for the beach. We stay in Nonthaburi so these are not long drives about 3 hrs in each direction, unlike e.g. Bangkok to Chaing Mai, but it would be nice to share the driving. Also, if I could do that then I can drive there on future visits. Furthemore, I would like to re-visit Indonesia and drive there to see places and I expect Indonesia to be worse than Thailand for foreigners to drive in.

I already have annual travel insurance (for medical etc.) but this does not cover me for driving someone elses car.
Returning from Hua Hin, let your friend drive. There is a huge interchange about halfway to BKK that always takes me 15-35 mins to navigate as I can never figure out which lane to be in and end up having to turn around several times until I finally find the right one to continue to BKK.

If you are concerned about insurance and think the insurance will be of use then you shouldnít drive in Thailand unless you rent a car. In the event of an accident nobody will look at insurance. A police officer will likely arrive and negotiate the cash settlement which will have no receipts. Your insurance wonít likely reimburse you based on your word that you paid the other party.

Iíve driven rental cars in Thailand many times. Iíve never had an IDP. Always just showed my foreign license. Last year in BKK Hertz informed me that while they didnít care if I had an IDP, the police may care. This year I rented from Hertz in Koh Samui they made me sign a form acknowledging that I was aware that an IDP was required. I now have a license from an ASEAN country so should be good.

To be frank, either rent a car or follow transpacís advice and stick to paying for gas.

As for Indonesia, not sure why you think it will be worse. Do they have a reputation for driving on the wrong side of the road on through windy hills full of blind turns like the Thais do?
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Old Sep 10, 19, 10:54 am
  #23  
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The reason for thinking Indonesia is worse than Thailand for driving is solely based on my casual observations from visiting both countries. But that's for a separate topic. I would like to return to Inodnesia, get a rental car and see more of the country.

For this trip to Thailand we would only be using my friend's car. No rental car would be involved.

I assumed that I would need to be added to my friend's car insurance or get my own car insurance (added to my travel insurance perhaps). When I had a foreign relative move to the UK he was put on a family memeber's car insurance so that he could drive here until with the family car until he bought his own car and insurance. It seems from the comments here that car insurance to drive my friend's car is not mandatory and worthless.
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Old Sep 10, 19, 6:28 pm
  #24  
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It may very well be mandatory. I don’t think anyone has said it is not. But there is a huge difference in Thailand between laws and regulations and what happens in reality.
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Old Sep 11, 19, 6:40 am
  #25  
 
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Driving in Thailand is OK. Drivers here usually follow the rules and the roads are generally good.
There is a tendency for expats to over-exaggerate how things are better back home compared to Thailand in all things.

The biggest advice I have is go slow and watch lane changes, particularly bikes which will lane split left and right. There are always "local" customs wherever you are in the world when driving; you compensate by being utterly predictable when you drive.

Many signs will only be in Thai which could complicate GPS directions - look to the signposted highway numbers in this case.
There will be right lanes that quickly change into left-merge lanes or U-turn lanes.
Be prepared for very short highway merge lanes.

Sois can be very narrow so be prepared to go extra slow and give-and take when sharing the road.
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Old Sep 12, 19, 2:00 am
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Most important...have good travel insurance and if in an accident that you are taken to the private hospitals not the state ones if possible! Make sure your friend has first class insurance and let them deal with any problems, do not get involved and it is normal now that the insurance agent gets called and they sort it out. Regarding driving here just do not expect them to follow any of the rules, they do not know how to turn the wheel or use the brakes which is to be expected as very few have driving lessons and the test for the licence is pointless.
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Old Sep 12, 19, 9:17 pm
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Originally Posted by tide View Post
Driving in Thailand is OK. Drivers here usually follow the rules and the roads are generally good.
There is a tendency for expats to over-exaggerate how things are better back home compared to Thailand in all things..........
I think you will find that the reason why many long term expats have serious concerns about the bad driving situation in Thailand is the fact that Thailand (according to the World Health Organisation) holds the undisputed title of being the second most deadly country in the world for road traffic fatalities. According to the WHO in 2018 over 21,000 people were killed in traffic accidents. In reality Thailand should hold the number one spot because the figures quoted only account for those would were pronounced dead and the scene, they do not include those who pass away on route to the hospital or succumb to their injuries later.

The accident below occurred yesterday. 6 passengers in the mini bus were killed. Cause = The young driver of a small car travelling at high speed in the opposite direction lost control, crossed the central reservation and collided with the bus head-on. Just a normal day here in Amazing Thailand.
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Old Sep 12, 19, 9:27 pm
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Originally Posted by Cyan123 View Post
Most important...have good travel insurance and if in an accident that you are taken to the private hospitals not the state ones if possible! Make sure your friend has first class insurance and let them deal with any problems, do not get involved and it is normal now that the insurance agent gets called and they sort it out. Regarding driving here just do not expect them to follow any of the rules, they do not know how to turn the wheel or use the brakes which is to be expected as very few have driving lessons and the test for the licence is pointless.
I would totally agree with your comments.

OP... FYI - the first class insurance referred to above is the same as fully comprehensive insurance back in the UK. If your friend does has first class insurance you need to ensure it is covers all/any driver(s), not just a named only driver. i.e. your friend.

I would also add if someone 'cuts you up' or annoys you by their inconsiderate driving, do not under any circumstances use the horn to show your disapproval. If you do ,you may well be looking down the barrel of a 9mm or faced by a machete wielding nut.
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Old Sep 12, 19, 9:39 pm
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Precisely why I prefer to take a train or plane whenever possible. I realize those modes do not go everywhere but it is nice to feel that I have a better chance of arriving alive by minimizing exposure time to the deadly roads & drivers there. Zero interest in driving any type of vehicle , other than a bicycle, while traveling in Thailand.
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Old Sep 12, 19, 10:23 pm
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Oldtiger View Post
The accident below occurred yesterday. 6 passengers in the mini bus were killed.
The car (Camry) actually looked worse than the minivan, initial death toll was five.

https://forum.thaivisa.com/topic/112...mment-14565290

No number of amulets gets me into a minivan.



Originally Posted by Oldtiger View Post
OP... FYI - the first class insurance referred to above
Also referred to as Type 1, or Class 1, or Category 1 insurance here.
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