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New Orleans - Top 25 Neighborhood Joints

New Orleans - Top 25 Neighborhood Joints

Old Aug 6, 01, 8:17 pm
  #1  
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New Orleans - Top 25 Neighborhood Joints

THE NEW ORLEANS MENU DAILY
By Tom Fitzmorris
Thursday, August 2, 2001

TOM'S 25 BEST NEIGHBORHOOD RESTAURANTS

I guess the best way to illustrate what I mean by a great New Orleans neighborhood restaurant is to make a list of the best of them.

I first did this about two years ago, and I was surprised by how much change has occurred in that short time. Which proves that neighborhood restaurants are not as timeless as you might imagine.

These places are all inexpensive, very casual, minimal in terms of decoration, and serve New Orleans food. The problem with a list like this is figuring out where neighborhood restaurants end and gourmet bistros begin. Last time, I included Vincent's on the list--which I now think was inappropriate.

So I came up with a rule. If it seems like the kind of place where you'd routinely order wine with the meal, then it's a bit too formal for this listing. How's that sound?

But that doesn't quite limit the definition enough. I also left out restaurants that mostly do sandwiches, as well as ethnic places (almost all Asian restaurants are neighborhood cafes, but most people put them in a different category). If you feel I left your favorite out, write me on the Ask Tom page.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
THE 25 BEST NEIGHBORHOOD RESTAURANTS

1. Jacques-Imo's. 8324 Oak, Riverbend 861-0886. Jacques, a guy from well out of town, teamed up with former Chez Helene owner Austin Leslie to create a convincing neighborhood Creole cafe in the former digs of Cafe Savanna. Austin has since departed, but he left a bunch of his recipes. A little front dining room and the rear courtyard are both available, and chances are that Jacques will come by, introduce himself, take the temperature of your appetite, and improvise dishes to fill it. Always interesting, sometimes excellent, usually slow-motion

2. Mandina's. 3800 Canal, Mid-City. 482-9179. Mandina's comes closer than any other restaurant to the Orleanian's cherished ideal of the old- time neighborhood cafe. The front room is the busier, with tables vying for space with the customers waiting for their turn at the bar. In the back is a utilitarian dining room that's a bit quieter. The whole place is furnished with neon, old painted signs, beer clocks, and other relics. The best food on any given day will be the homestyle specials, with a further edge to non-seafoods. All portions are titanic, but somehow avoid grossness. The service staff has been here a long time and will not be impressed by anything you have to offer.

3. Uglesich's. 1238 Baronne, Lee Circle Area. 523-8571. Uglesich's is a concentrated dose of New Orleans funk--a bit much for some who, after inspecting the place and its neighborhood, drive on by. If you take the leap of faith you will be rewarded with food that some gourmet restaurants would do well to imitate. The oyster po-boy, for example, is made from oysters that are not only fried but shucked to order. Anthony and Gail Uglesich have pushed their menu's envelope far beyond sandwiches in recent years; you can now get an astounding assortment (considering the kitchen) of grilled, sauteed, and fried platters, many highly original. Beware: if they tell you something is spicy, believe them. Those raw oysters at the bar are good, too. There's never an open table when you walk in, but there will be by the time the food comes out.

4. Mandich's. 3200 St. Claude Ave, Bywater. 947-9553. Restaurant Mandich has always been predominantly a lunch place; its original clientele came from businesses on the riverfront, which start and shut down early in the day. That legacy lives on in the food, which is two or three cuts more ambitious and better than that of the typical neighborhood restaurant--although you shouldn't entertain any notions of finding anything unconventional. The dining room verges on the antique, but it's comfortable enough. Most of the customers are regulars, but they always welcome unfamiliar faces. Few enough restaurants of this ilk survive these days that a meal here becomes special.

5. Bruning's. West End Park. 282-9395. We're still waiting for the reconstruction of Bruning's old over-the-lake quarters. But in the long-wait-for-a-table meantime we note no slide in the quality of the food. A new specialty: big slabs of broiled redfish.

6. Fury's. 724 Martin Behrman Ave., Metairie. 834-5646. A neighborhood seafood cafe in the old style, with all that implies both in the way of honest, cooked-to-order food as well as outmoded (but also honest) atrocities. The shortcomings are easily ignorable, however, in view of the low prices and goodness of the basic specialties. Seafood dominates, with every imaginable combination platter, fried or broiled. But the specials are pure backstreet New Orleans cuisine, served to a clientele as regular as ever patronized a corner cafe.

7. Elizabeth's. 601 Gallier, Bywater. 944-9272. "Real Food Done Real Good" is the slogan of this unlikely cafe in the Bywater section. The food is also disarming: it's Southern food, as opposed to the very different Creole cooking usually found around town. They do breakfast and lunch weekdays only, and every bit of it is honest home cooking that always winds up delighting you more than you think it will.

8. Katie's. 3701 Iberville, Mid-City. 488-6582. In Mid-City, where there are more good old-style neighborhood restaurants than anywhere else in town, Katie's is one of the best. The layout is classic: two big rooms, one with a bar and a jukebox, the other with a window through which the kitchen passes its work to the waitresses. They not only excel at all the classics of local streetcorner cuisine (po-boys, red beans, seafood platters, etc.) but also get ambitious at times with the daily specials. The raw foodstuffs are of far greater intrinsic interest than in most such places.

9. Liuzza's, 3636 Bienville, Mid-City. HU2-9120. Liuzza's is your archetypal neighborhood "Bar & Rest." There is a signature item: the frozen glass schooners of root beer and not-so-root beer. Just like in the old days, the menu is implausibly large, starting with a really good roast beef po-boy and continuing with homestyle daily specials, seafood platters, and Italian dishes. Fresh-potato fries and the hole in the dining room wall through which you see evidence of a bursting kitchen are artifacts of the style, once far more commonplace than it is now.

10. Liuzza's By The Track. 1518 N. Lopez, Mid-City. 943-8667. This is the less-well-known of the two Liuzza's. And the better one, too—of only because the kitchen is more ambitious. They have the standard lineup of poor boy sandwiches and platters, but the chef is capable of producing some excellent specials--and he does. All of this is served in the circumstances of a neighborhood hangout, with prices to match.

11. Barrow's Shady Inn. 2714 Mistletoe, Uptown. 482-9427. Barrow's, well-hidden Uptown since 1943, fries incomparably light catfish that's so good you eat it like popcorn. And that's all they have. The fish has a little touch of pepper in the flavor that makes it unusual. You also get some fine homemade potato salad.

12. Cafe Atchafalaya. 901 Louisiana Ave., Uptown. 891-5271. Spare but comfortable, Cafe Atchafalaya serves not only Creole food but also the very different (and locally uncommon) dishes of the rest of the South. The latter tend to lower spice levels, but are so well made with such fine groceries that there's no lack of excitement. The homely daily specials are heartwarmingly wonderful. Unexpected delights abound: terrific jalapeno cheese bread comes shortly after you sit down, for example. "Slightly sophisticated, rather Southern" is the menu motto, and that about captures it.

13. Galley Seafood. 2535 Metairie Rd., Old Metairie. 832-0955. The proprietors are famous (justly) for the soft-shell crab po-boy at the Jazz Festival. This little place serves that year round, as well as a menu of small and large seafood platters, usually fried lightly to order. The blackboard shows off a passel of home cooking every day; the soups here are always especially good. They also boil the usual crustaceans for eating in or removing to home.

14. Gumbo Shop. 630 St. Peter, French Quarter. 525-1486. This best-named of all New Orleans restaurants isn't as old as its yellowed murals or antique dining room look. But never mind: if it's traditional everyday New Orleans eats you want, here they are. Gumbo and the other homestyle Creole specials are very credibly done every single day. Prices are a lot lower than they could be, given the popularity and great location of the restaurant.

15. West End Cafe. 8536 Pontchartrain Blvd., Lakeview. 288-0711. This is a successful hybrid of two cherished ideals: the classic neighborhood cafe and the casual fried-seafood restaurant. The result is uniquely enjoyable, even when the food falls a little short of your dreams. The West End is full of surprises; their occasional forays in to the world of ambitious cooking are quite successful. Good daily specials, especially things like meat loaf (a sellout every Tuesday) and soups. Boiled seafood is often available still steaming hot. If you have kids, hand them a roll of quarters and point them toward the claw machine, and you'll be able to have a conversation for a change.

16. Alonso's. 587 Central Ave., Jefferson. 733-2796. Alonso's, a great old neighborhood joint in Old Jefferson, closed a few years ago when the owner retired. A group of old customers who missed it too much bought it and kept place essentially the same. What they do here is seafood (fried and boiled), poor boy sandwiches, and blue-plate specials so predictable you could probably figure out the whole schedule with no prompting. On Tuesdays and Fridays here, they do an all-you-can-eat catfish thing that's very popular and pretty good, too. During the shank of the season, they'll also allow that surfeit on boiled crawfish or crabs.

17. Dunbar's. 4927 Freret, Uptown, 899-0734. Although the all-you-can-eat red beans and fried chicken has gone the way of all other too-good deals, this is still a very cheap, honest source of Creole-style home cooking. The place reminds me of the soul food restaurants of the Sixties, but the place and the food are better. Tulane and Loyola students come here a lot.

18. Mr. Ed's. 1001 Live Oak, Metairie. 838-0022. Mr. Ed operates a few deli-style restaurants in Metairie, but this is his main location, with an unadorned but comfortable dining room and a big menu of all the low-end local specialties. There's a tilt toward seafood platters and poor boys, with the rest of the day's specials being in the red-beans category. It's not brilliant cooking, but not bad. If you want to watch television, you can here.

19. Rip's Seafood Restaurant. 1917 Lakeshore Dr., Mandeville. 626-7585. Rip's is a reliable standard for the basic seafood appetites we have around here, and offers a view of the lake from the Mandeville seawall to boot. The place has been around since the Forties under a parade of owners; Ken Leveque, the guy who has it now, has turned it into one of the best casual seafood restaurants around. They serve a first-class poor boy sandwich (of seafood or anything else), boiled seafood, and fried platters. But they can also stretch into some carefully-prepared specials on a higher plane. The service staff is casual but happy. After or before you eat, take a stroll along the seawall, and look for crabs scuttling around on the lake bottom.

20. Joey K's. 3001 Magazine, Uptown. 891-0997. The Irish Channel is where you expect to find restaurants like Joey K's, and they take full advantage of that cliche here. All the backstreet dishes are here: red beans, fried catfish, brisket, liver and onions, etc., etc. Of course, we really do love all that stuff, and so the place does a good business with people who used to eat in joints like this when they didn't dress as well as they do today. Some specials are better than others, but the chances of having your palate satisfied are decent. It is inconceivable that your stomach will leave wanting for more. Just grubby enough to be convincing without becoming sleazy.

21. Casamento's. 4330 Magazine, Uptown. 895-9761. Although it's not as consistent as it once was, Casamento's--a big, long room covered with enough spanking-clean Art Nouveau tiles that it looks like a gigantic bathroom--is still a first-class vendor of oysters. They're terrific in either raw or fried form; no small number of patrons start with the first and finish with the second. The oyster loaf here is not a po-boy but a sandwich made on thickly sliced, toasted, buttered "pan bread." The Italian dishes are completely forgettable.

22. Petunia's. 817 St. Louis, French Quarter. 522-6440. The French Quarter and neighboring Marigny have, in lieu of the neighborhood cafes found in other parts of the city, a certain kind of cafe with a few too many plants and a menu of somewhat precious versions of Creole standards. They're popular among both Quarter residents and visitors. This is one of those, specializing in breakfasts, salads, crepes (the savory versions are incredibly rich, but good anyway), and a mixture of local cliches with some original takes on Creole cooking. It's all decent food, sold at prices below those prevailing in most of the Quarter.
23. Praline Connection. 542 Frenchmen, Marigny. 943-3934. The soul-food restaurant of the Nineties: hip, jazzy, and cooking slightly gussied-up but still homestyle Creole meals with good fresh ingredients. You get your beans and greens (whatever kind you like), your chicken, fish, and chops. Not entirely consistent, but usually pretty good. The original location in Marigny is hard to find a table in. The Warehouse District location is much bigger, encompassing a full-fledged jazz and blues hall.

24. Judice's. 421 E. Gibson, Covington. 892-0708. Judice's took over the antique former location of Nathan's, an ancient po-boy place in Old Covington. It serves a menu of breakfasts and lunches that include both very familiar food and some unexpected concoctions. The environment is that of the neighborhood hangout, with a large old bar dominating one side of the room. Everything is loose and casual.

25. Fiorella's. 1136 Decatur, French Quarter. 528-9566. Fiorella's has been a fixture in the French Market area for decades, but it was something of a mystery except to its regulars. Until recently. The Rocky & Carlo's people took the place over some time ago, and added a dinner menu (a few nights a week, anyway) to the basic collection of breakfasts and lunches that have always been here.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
YOUR THOUGHTS?
Tell me and other avid diners how you feel about this or any other
eating, cooking, or drinking topic at our interactive message board:
http://www.insideneworleans.com/rest...od/asktom.html
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m., WSMB 1350 AM
To call in to the show, dial 260-WSMB.

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Old Sep 16, 03, 3:21 pm
  #2  
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2003 update:

THE NEW ORLEANS MENU DAILY
By Tom Fitzmorris
Tuesday, September 16, 2003

THE 25 BEST NEW ORLEANS NEIGHBORHOOD RESTAURANTS

1. Jacques-Imo's. 8324 Oak, Riverbend 861-0886. Jack Leonardi, former K-Paul's cook, teamed up a decade ago with former Chez Helene owner Austin Leslie to create a convincing neighborhood Creole cafe uptown. Austin does the fried chicken and acts as the patron saint. Chances are that Jack will come by, introduce himself, take the temperature of your appetite, and improvise dishes to fill it. A little front dining room and the rear courtyard are both available. Always interesting, sometimes excellent, usually difficult to get a table.

2. Mandina's. 3800 Canal, Mid-City. 482-9179. Mandina's comes closer than any other restaurant to the Orleanian's cherished ideal of the old-time neighborhood cafe. A renovation a few years ago added tables and a parking lot, making the place even more inviting. The front room is busiest, with tables vying for space with the customers waiting for their turn at the bar. In the back is a utilitarian dining room that's a bit quieter. The best food on any given day will be the homestyle specials, with a further edge to non-seafoods. All portions are titanic, but somehow avoid grossness. The service staff has been here a long time and will not be impressed by anything you have to offer.

3. Uglesich's. 1238 Baronne, Lee Circle Area. 523-8571. Uglesich's is a concentrated dose of New Orleans funk--a bit much for some who, after inspecting the place and its neighborhood, drive on by. If you take the leap of faith you will be rewarded with food that some gourmet restaurants would do well to imitate. The oyster po-boy, for example, is made from oysters that are not only fried but shucked to order. Anthony and Gail Uglesich have pushed their menu's envelope far beyond sandwiches in recent years; you can now get an astounding assortment (considering the kitchen) of grilled, sauteed, and fried platters, many highly original. Beware: if they tell you something is spicy, believe them. Those raw oysters at the bar are good, too. There's never an open table when you walk in, but there will be by the time the food comes out. We may be in the last days of this 79-year-old restaurant. At this writing, Uglesich's they're closed for an extended summer vacation, but scheduled to re-open in October.

4. Mandich. 3200 St. Claude Ave, Bywater. 947-9553. Restaurant Mandich has always been predominantly a lunch place; its original clientele came from businesses on the riverfront, which start and shut down early in the day. That legacy lives on in the food, which is two or three cuts more ambitious and better than that of the typical neighborhood restaurant--although you shouldn't entertain any notions of finding anything unconventional. The dining room verges on the antique, but it's comfortable enough. Most of the customers are regulars, but they always welcome unfamiliar faces. Few enough restaurants of this ilk survive these days that a meal here becomes special.

5. Bruning's. West End Park. 282-9395. We're still waiting for the reconstruction of Bruning's old over-the-lake quarters. But in the long-wait-for-a-table meantime we note no slide in the quality of the food. A new specialty: big slabs of broiled redfish.

6. Fury's*. 724 Martin Behrman Ave., Metairie. 834-5646. A neighborhood seafood cafe in the old style, with all that implies both in the way of honest, cooked-to-order food as well as outmoded (but also honest) atrocities. The shortcomings are easily ignorable, however, in view of the low prices and goodness of the basic specialties. Seafood dominates, with every imaginable combination platter, fried or broiled. But the specials are pure backstreet New Orleans cuisine, served to a clientele as regular as ever patronized a corner cafe.

7. Bozo's. 3117 21st Street, Metairie. 831-8666. Bozo's has been around since the 1920s, moving from Mid-City to Metairie in the 1970s. Bozo's selects its seafoods well and cooks it all to order, adding a few minutes to the process but resulting in hot, greaseless and crisp eats. The menu is limited. The only fish is catfish--but perfect, small, wild fillets, cornmeal-encrusted and crunchy golden brown. Bozo's oyster bar is one of the best, perfect raw and great fried. I start every meal here with the chicken andouille gumbo. Service is professional, and owner Chris Vodonovich is always in the kitchen.

8. Katie's. 3701 Iberville, Mid-City. 488-6582. Mid-City has more good old-style neighborhood restaurants than anywhere else in town, and Katie's is one of its best. The layout is classic: two big rooms, one with a bar and a jukebox, the other with a window through which the kitchen passes its work to the waitresses. They not only excel at all the classics of local streetcorner cuisine (po-boys, red beans, seafood platters, etc.) but also get ambitious at times with the daily specials. The raw foodstuffs are of far greater intrinsic interest than in most such places.

9. Liuzza's By The Track. 1518 N. Lopez, Mid-City. 943-8667. The lesser-known of the two Liuzza's, but the slightly better one--if only because the kitchen is more ambitious. They have the standard lineup of poor boy sandwiches and platters, but the chef producing excellent specials. All of this is served in the cramped circumstances of a neighborhood hangout, with prices to match.

10. Liuzza's, 3636 Bienville, Mid-City. HU2-9120. Liuzza's is your archetypal neighborhood "Bar & Rest." There is a signature item: the frozen glass schooners of root beer and not-so-root beer. Just like in the old days, the menu is implausibly large, starting with a really good roast beef po-boy and continuing with homestyle daily specials, seafood platters, and Italian dishes. Fresh-potato fries and the hole in the dining room wall through which you see evidence of a bursting kitchen are artifacts of the style, once far more commonplace than it is now.

11. Barrow's Shady Inn. 2714 Mistletoe, Uptown. 482-9427. Barrow's, well-hidden Uptown since 1943, fries incomparably light catfish that's so good you eat it like popcorn. And that's all they have. The fish has a little touch of pepper in the flavor that makes it unusual. You also get some fine homemade potato salad.

12. Galley Seafood. 2535 Metairie Rd., Old Metairie. 832-0955. The proprietors are famous (justly) for the soft-shell crab po-boy at the Jazz Festival. This little place serves that year round, as well as a menu of small and large seafood platters, usually fried lightly to order. The blackboard shows off a passel of home cooking every day; the soups here are always especially good. They also boil the usual crustaceans for eating in or removing to home.

13. Charles Sea Foods*. Harahan: 8311 Jefferson Hwy. 737-9190 For most of the history of Harahan, this has been the only restaurant in town. It's always been a good one, but in the past few years they've added a growing range of specialties. This is one of the best places in the area to eat boiled seafood in season. They serve it the way they did before we became self-conscious about sucking the heads and pinching the tails. The fried and stuffed seafood platters are also good.

14. Cafe Atchafalaya. 901 Louisiana Ave., Uptown. 891-5271. Spare but comfortable, Cafe Atchafalaya serves not only Creole food but also the very different (and locally uncommon) dishes of the rest of the South. The latter tend to lower spice levels, but are so well made with such fine groceries that there's no lack of excitement. The homely daily specials are heartwarmingly wonderful. Unexpected delights abound: terrific jalapeno cheese bread comes shortly after you sit down, for example. "Slightly sophisticated, rather Southern" is the menu motto, and that about captures it.

15. West End Cafe. 8536 Pontchartrain Blvd., Lakeview. 288-0711. This is a successful hybrid of two cherished ideals: the classic neighborhood cafe and the casual fried-seafood restaurant. The result is uniquely enjoyable, even when the food falls a little short of your dreams. The West End is full of surprises; their occasional forays in to the world of ambitious cooking are quite successful. Good daily specials, especially things like meat loaf (a sellout every Tuesday) and soups. Boiled seafood is often available still steaming hot. If you have kids, hand them a roll of quarters and point them toward the claw machine, and you'll be able to have a conversation for a change.

16. Cafe Reconcile. 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 568-1157. The non-profit mission is unique: to lift undereducated, underskilled people into careers in the hospitality industry. A staff of pros orchestrates things, but the students do everything else. What comes out at breakfast and lunch comes as a surprise, particularly at the laughably low prices. This is very good Creole cooking, using good ingredients and served well. If you didn't know about the student aspect, you'd never know it.

17. Dunbar's. 4927 Freret, Uptown, 899-0734. Although the all-you-can-eat red beans and fried chicken has gone the way of all other too-good deals, this is still a very cheap, honest source of Creole-style home cooking. The place reminds me of the soul food restaurants of the Sixties, but the place and the food are better. Tulane and Loyola students come here a lot.

18. Mr. Ed's. 1001 Live Oak, Metairie. 838-0022. Mr. Ed operates a few deli-style restaurants in Metairie, but this is his main location, with an unadorned but comfortable dining room and a big menu of all the low-end local specialties. There's a tilt toward seafood platters and po-boys, with the rest of the day's specials being in the red-beans category. It's not brilliant cooking, but not bad. If you want to watch television, you can here.

19. Ye Olde College Inn. 3016 S. Carrollton Ave, 866-3683. The Rock 'n' Bowl guys bought this old (since the 1930s) Carrollton Avenue standby and did very little to it. The plan is to retain every scrap of that old-time New Orleans funkiness, but perhaps to brush up things a little. The College Inn has always been good, but already I'm seeing some improvements.

20. Joey K's. 3001 Magazine, Uptown. 891-0997. The Irish Channel is where you expect to find restaurants like Joey K's, and they take full advantage of that cliche here. All the backstreet dishes are here: red beans, fried catfish, brisket, liver and onions, etc., etc. Of course, we really do love all that stuff, and so the place does a good business with people who used to eat in joints like this when they didn't dress as well as they do today. Some specials are better than others, but the chances of having your palate satisfied are decent. It is inconceivable that your stomach will leave wanting for more. Just grubby enough to be convincing without becoming sleazy.

21. Casamento's. 4330 Magazine, Uptown. 895-9761. Although it's not as consistent as it once was, Casamento's--a big, long room covered with enough spanking-clean Art Nouveau tiles that it looks like a gigantic bathroom--is still a first-class vendor of oysters. They're terrific in either raw or fried form; no small number of patrons start with the first and finish with the second. The oyster loaf here is not a po-boy but a sandwich made on thickly sliced, toasted, buttered "pan bread." The Italian dishes are completely forgettable.

22. Landry's. 789 Harrison Ave, 488-6476. Not to be confused with the Landry's chain, this is a little corner seafood and short-order spot in Lakeview. Deliciousness starts at the oyster bar and proceeds without a misstep through sandwiches, daily specials, gumbo, and seafood platters. Inexpensive and unprepossessing.

23. Elizabeth's. 601 Gallier, Bywater. 944-9272. "Real Food Done Real Good" is the slogan of this unlikely cafe in the Bywater section. The food is also disarming: it's Southern food, as opposed to the very different Creole cooking usually found around town. They do breakfast and lunch weekdays only, and every bit of it is honest home cooking that always winds up delighting you more than you think it will.

24. Judice's. 421 E. Gibson, Covington. 892-0708. Judice's took over the antique former location of Nathan's, an ancient po-boy place in Old Covington. It serves a menu of breakfasts and lunches that include both very familiar food and some unexpected concoctions. The environment is that of the neighborhood hangout, with a large old bar dominating one side of the room. Everything is loose and casual.

25. Praline Connection. 542 Frenchmen, Marigny. 943-3934. The soul-food restaurant of the Nineties: hip, jazzy, and cooking slightly gussied-up but still homestyle Creole meals with good fresh ingredients. You get your beans and greens (whatever kind you like), your chicken, fish, and chops. Not entirely consistent, but usually pretty good. The original location in Marigny is hard to find a table in. The Warehouse District location is much bigger, encompassing a full-fledged jazz and blues hall.


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Old Sep 17, 03, 7:07 pm
  #3  
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What kind of top twenty-five list of neighborhood joints in New Orleans could leave off the Camellia Grill?

Sincerely,

William R. Sanders
Customer Service Coordinator
Starwood Preferred Services

[email protected]

[This message has been edited by Starwood Lurker (edited 09-17-2003).]
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Old Sep 22, 03, 11:36 am
  #4  
 
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Location: Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
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Camelia is great, but c'mon Lurker -- it's just a diner.

FWIW, I have had some of the best meals of my life at Uglesich's. It's hard to imagine the place ever closing.
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