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Visiting Machu Picchu. Need suggestions!

Visiting Machu Picchu. Need suggestions!

Old Mar 13, 18, 7:26 am
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Visiting Machu Picchu. Need suggestions!

Iím going to visit Peru by June, and Machu Picchu is part of my itinerary. This place is very ancient and I love discovering new things, especially when it talks about a countryís historical site. Aside from that Iím also taking part of the singles latin tour in Peru, plus a free tour in the countryís featured destinations. Now I need suggestions on the possible activities I can enjoy in the place. Please do tell me some Machu Picchu actions I can do while also enjoying my stay in Peru. Thanks!
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Old Mar 13, 18, 9:34 am
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Welcome to Flyertalk, christoff1980. I. am moving your thread to the South America Forum
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Old Mar 13, 18, 9:37 am
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Thank you so much! I really appreciate it
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Old Mar 13, 18, 10:33 am
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As of last July 1, you will not be allowed into Machu Picchu without a guide. Your guide, and the posted path that all groups must follow since that same date, will pretty much determine what you do within the ruins. The good news is that most guides are quite knowledgeable and the posted path goes through or by all the places you'd want to see, so that needn't be a problem (though some repeat visitors resent it). (As you search the Internet for information on Machu Picchu, keep in mind that anything posted before July 2017 may not reflect today's regulations.)

The other things you can do are to hike to the summit of Mount Machu Picchu, to the summit of Huyana Picchu (either requires an advance permit; you probably won't get both), to the Inca Bridge, to Intipunku (the Sun Gate) and perhaps a couple of other places. You don't have to be a super mountain climber to do those, but you do have to be in better than average physical condition as the hikes start at 8000' altitude and go up from there. There's also the Inca Trail hike to reach Machu Picchu, but if your tour doesn't include it, it won't be practical for you to do it on your own.
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Old Mar 14, 18, 7:24 am
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Originally Posted by Efrem View Post
As of last July 1, you will not be allowed into Machu Picchu without a guide. Your guide, and the posted path that all groups must follow since that same date, will pretty much determine what you do within the ruins. The good news is that most guides are quite knowledgeable and the posted path goes through or by all the places you'd want to see, so that needn't be a problem (though some repeat visitors resent it). (As you search the Internet for information on Machu Picchu, keep in mind that anything posted before July 2017 may not reflect today's regulations.)

The other things you can do are to hike to the summit of Mount Machu Picchu, to the summit of Huyana Picchu (either requires an advance permit; you probably won't get both), to the Inca Bridge, to Intipunku (the Sun Gate) and perhaps a couple of other places. You don't have to be a super mountain climber to do those, but you do have to be in better than average physical condition as the hikes start at 8000' altitude and go up from there. There's also the Inca Trail hike to reach Machu Picchu, but if your tour doesn't include it, it won't be practical for you to do it on your own.
This is actually a good news for me, having guides with you will keep you safe and head up with other events when visiting Machu Picchu. What I'm excited about is the hike to the summit of MP, this will be so challenging to me, I guess. Thanks! This is a great help. Have a great one!
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Old Mar 16, 18, 12:29 am
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Originally Posted by Efrem View Post
As of last July 1, you will not be allowed into Machu Picchu without a guide. Your guide, and the posted path that all groups must follow since that same date, will pretty much determine what you do within the ruins. The good news is that most guides are quite knowledgeable and the posted path goes through or by all the places you'd want to see, so that needn't be a problem (though some repeat visitors resent it). (As you search the Internet for information on Machu Picchu, keep in mind that anything posted before July 2017 may not reflect today's regulations.)

The other things you can do are to hike to the summit of Mount Machu Picchu, to the summit of Huyana Picchu (either requires an advance permit; you probably won't get both), to the Inca Bridge, to Intipunku (the Sun Gate) and perhaps a couple of other places. You don't have to be a super mountain climber to do those, but you do have to be in better than average physical condition as the hikes start at 8000' altitude and go up from there. There's also the Inca Trail hike to reach Machu Picchu, but if your tour doesn't include it, it won't be practical for you to do it on your own.
That's really some bad advice. Tour guides are not required for entrance, despite the new regulations.....and if this thread was posted where it's supposed to be in the "Peru" forum, the experts over there would further confirm this fact.

My Machu Picchu report. August 12, the new restrictions
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Old Mar 17, 18, 11:30 pm
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I went to Macchu Picchu as a daytrip out of Cuzco before the regulations, though I worked 2 hours on site as part of a tour and 2 hours without. The 2 hours without were late afternoon, which was good picture-taking time and I got to see some people who were just getting there after days on the Inca trail. It definitely looked like a prime place if hiking's your thing and you can handle a lot of the moderate stuff at some altitude (though not quite as high as Cuzco).

Ollyantambo, which is where the train stopped and the buses to MP left, had Inca sites of its own and a certain charm. I liked Cuzco as well...always something different every day at the Plaza de Armas (from bitter protests over plans to build a mine to a colorful parade). Also more Inca sites nearby, a chocolate museum and lots of atmosphere, though high enough that the altitude did get to me a bit.
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Old Mar 19, 18, 11:46 am
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Originally Posted by Efrem View Post
As of last July 1, you will not be allowed into Machu Picchu without a guide. .
I visited Machu Picchu this past Friday with a group of students. (my 11th visit). They were not enforcing the new half-day ticket rules nor the you must have a guide rule. That said, I wouldn't dream of visiting MP without a guide. What they ARE enforcing is that many of the paths through MP are one-way only and it has become impossible to just wander around aimlessly.
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Old Apr 3, 18, 8:34 am
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Visited the area in late December 2018 and did the one day Inca Trail to Machu Picchu (instead of just taking the bus up). If you don't mind a moderate-rigorous day hike, that's the way to do it - highly recommended (plus you get to see MP 2 days in a row). It was an amazing experience that still gives you a little taste of the surrounding area/landscape when you don't have time to do the full Inca Trail. It is a little pricey (and you can only do with when accompanied by a guide - they are the only ones that can get permits), but it allows you to see a couple of more secluded ruins before getting to Machu Picchu. Most tours follow a similar itinerary. You start very early in the morning (in Cuzco or Ollantaytambo), hike mostly uphill for the better part of the day, and by early afternoon arrive at the Sun Gate, where you get the first view of Machu Picchu from the distance. Then hike down to the citadel and spend a couple of hours there just taking it all in. You spend the night in Aguas Calientes. The following morning you take the bus back up and the guide takes you through the ruins and gives you the formal tour (absolutely necessary otherwise you will miss so much!). After the tour you are free to do whatever you want... hike up to Huayna Picchu or Machu Picchu Mountain (need tickets for both) and/or to the Inca Bridge (free, short, and scenic).
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