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Swedish Consumer Agency opens investigation in SAS post-strike

Swedish Consumer Agency opens investigation in SAS post-strike

Old Sep 23, 22, 9:41 am
  #76  
 
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Originally Posted by fassy View Post
Names are... kind of arbritrary... a lot of my contacts in China, Taiwan, Korea, Thailand, India and a lot of African nations do use English (Christian) names if they have any business with Europeans or Americans.

Some are rather creative in finding a good like Charlene for Sha Li but others are just pick up any name from a western TV show they like.
In a lot of schools in Hong Kong, students are told to have a Western name (make one if your parents haven't given you one), and some parents chose to only put Western names in their children's birth certificate - which is an awesome thing because you'll ever have the issue of people can't pronounce your name. I address myself with my Western name, in fact every one of my friend in Hong Kong called me that and I used that for all my FFP/hotel programme etc. without my Chinese names. I should have removed all those Chinese names on my passport when I got married 23 years ago and then the ordeal with SAS/Egypt Air would never have happened. The name only makes sense if you know Chinese, and if not they are just unpronounceable sounds.
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Old Sep 25, 22, 4:02 am
  #77  
 
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I find the use of Western name by Asian folks still very odd. The Japanese don't do it and I have no problem reading or pronouncing their names, the same with many Chinese, Korean or Singaporese names. Names like Li, Chen, Zhang, Fei, Wu, Ni are not hard to pronounce for Westerners. The main issue is that a lot of folks have the exact same names so its hard to distinguish when you have 8 xiaosomethings, hos or bingbings in a meeting. Having a 5 feet Chinese guy show up in a meeting calling himself Jason, Hunter or a Chinese woman called Cinderella or Mercedes just doesn't add up.
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Old Sep 25, 22, 4:51 am
  #78  
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Originally Posted by FlyingMoose View Post
I find the use of Western name by Asian folks still very odd. The Japanese don't do it and I have no problem reading or pronouncing their names, the same with many Chinese, Korean or Singaporese names. Names like Li, Chen, Zhang, Fei, Wu, Ni are not hard to pronounce for Westerners. The main issue is that a lot of folks have the exact same names so its hard to distinguish when you have 8 xiaosomethings, hos or bingbings in a meeting. Having a 5 feet Chinese guy show up in a meeting calling himself Jason, Hunter or a Chinese woman called Cinderella or Mercedes just doesn't add up.
While not that common in Japan, it does happen. Mostly people who spend a lot of time in the US as expats, or maybe from their university days in the US. We can only guess if it is the foreign language skills of the average American? More common amongst Japanese people is that they cut syllable out of their names, to something that is more palatable for foreigners.

It is not just Americans though, I find that Brits just refuse to even try to pronounce words in any other logic than British English intonation. I notice that some of my British colleagues struggles to understand if I pronounce Haneda in the Japanese way, rather than the British way with a strong high intonation on the second syllable. So the abbreviated names are kind of needed in UK as well.

I did once ask a Singapore Chinese colleague where his English calling name was coming from, as it was not his official name. The answer was his mother called him that from a very early age.
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Old Sep 25, 22, 7:20 am
  #79  
 
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Originally Posted by FlyingMoose View Post
I find the use of Western name by Asian folks still very odd. The Japanese don't do it and I have no problem reading or pronouncing their names, the same with many Chinese, Korean or Singaporese names. Names like Li, Chen, Zhang, Fei, Wu, Ni are not hard to pronounce for Westerners. The main issue is that a lot of folks have the exact same names so its hard to distinguish when you have 8 xiaosomethings, hos or bingbings in a meeting. Having a 5 feet Chinese guy show up in a meeting calling himself Jason, Hunter or a Chinese woman called Cinderella or Mercedes just doesn't add up.
What about Ng?

Those you wrote are last names, and the English pronunciation is not the same as what you say it in Cantonese/Mandarin etc. I don't remember how many times I had to correct my kids to silent the last letter when they were trying to pronounce words in Cantonese.

Zh is not as easy as you think if you want to pronounce it properly, my Chinese teacher was trying very hard to correct their pronunciations.
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Old Sep 25, 22, 7:34 am
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Originally Posted by CPH-Flyer View Post
While not that common in Japan, it does happen. Mostly people who spend a lot of time in the US as expats, or maybe from their university days in the US. We can only guess if it is the foreign language skills of the average American? More common amongst Japanese people is that they cut syllable out of their names, to something that is more palatable for foreigners.

It is not just Americans though, I find that Brits just refuse to even try to pronounce words in any other logic than British English intonation. I notice that some of my British colleagues struggles to understand if I pronounce Haneda in the Japanese way, rather than the British way with a strong high intonation on the second syllable. So the abbreviated names are kind of needed in UK as well.

I did once ask a Singapore Chinese colleague where his English calling name was coming from, as it was not his official name. The answer was his mother called him that from a very early age.
What about Lego and Ikea?
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Old Sep 27, 22, 4:20 am
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Data point: My request for compensation under EU261 sent in on July 8th, has been approved today (Sept 27th) and they say that money will be transferred in 8-9 business days.
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Old Sep 27, 22, 5:51 am
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Originally Posted by jerry_greece View Post
Data point: My request for compensation under EU261 sent in on July 8th, has been approved today (Sept 27th) and they say that money will be transferred in 8-9 business days.
Is it only the EU 261 without any extra cost like lodging/food?
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Old Sep 27, 22, 6:13 am
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Yep. Only EU261 (400 euro for intra-Europe trip).
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Old Sep 27, 22, 8:19 am
  #84  
 
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Originally Posted by FlyingMoose View Post
I find the use of Western name by Asian folks still very odd. The Japanese don't do it and I have no problem reading or pronouncing their names, the same with many Chinese, Korean or Singaporese names. Names like Li, Chen, Zhang, Fei, Wu, Ni are not hard to pronounce for Westerners. The main issue is that a lot of folks have the exact same names so its hard to distinguish when you have 8 xiaosomethings, hos or bingbings in a meeting. Having a 5 feet Chinese guy show up in a meeting calling himself Jason, Hunter or a Chinese woman called Cinderella or Mercedes just doesn't add up.
As an Asian person with a "normal" western name (not Cinderella or Mercedes or Coconut), my Chinese name is nearly always butchered by westerners from all walks of life. Except the ones who have studied Chinese extensively. Using an English name I chose for myself helps us move on swiftly rather than them trying but failing to pronounce it (or me lying and saying it was correct).

People studying Chinese are usually encouraged by their teachers to choose a Chinese name (or have one chosen for them) too. Is that also bizarre or unacceptable? Why not let people choose the names they want to use instead of judging whether they should stick with the one from "their" culture or not.
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Old Sep 27, 22, 10:00 am
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Have they got a minute to look into ETraveli/MyTrip/GotoGate?
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Old Sep 30, 22, 9:24 am
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Originally Posted by Agneisse View Post
People studying Chinese are usually encouraged by their teachers to choose a Chinese name (or have one chosen for them) too. Is that also bizarre or unacceptable? Why not let people choose the names they want to use instead of judging whether they should stick with the one from "their" culture or not.
While I never studied Chinese, I did this for a while and it was not appreciated by any of the locals. I don't really care if people adopt names, provided they add up if its meant to ease cultural interactions. I've meet a disproportional amount of Asian people that adopted the name "Tony" for some reason, which resonates surprisingly well. Its the over the top names that stand out, just like when you would call your Western kid any of those names.

One of my favorite Chinese colleagues is called Rudolph which gets him a ton of attention and compliments at the end of the (Western) year. He frequently stops using his Western name during that period.
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Old Oct 2, 22, 3:25 pm
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Originally Posted by FlyingMoose View Post
While I never studied Chinese, I did this for a while and it was not appreciated by any of the locals. I don't really care if people adopt names, provided they add up if its meant to ease cultural interactions. I've meet a disproportional amount of Asian people that adopted the name "Tony" for some reason, which resonates surprisingly well. Its the over the top names that stand out, just like when you would call your Western kid any of those names.

One of my favorite Chinese colleagues is called Rudolph which gets him a ton of attention and compliments at the end of the (Western) year. He frequently stops using his Western name during that period.
Lots of foreign diplomats and senior business leaders get chinese names when they are posted to China and I would assume they are doing so on proper cultural advice rather than offending people left and right. If Wikipedia is to be believed then this is nearly all of the recent career diplomats (charge d'affaires) at the US embassy*, every German ambassador since 1984, every French ambassador since 1990, every Australian ambassador ever except one weirdo in 1984 etc.

Anyway we can agree to disagree I think it is amusing when people call themselves Superman, Usnavy, or Princess, just like when some foreigners study chinese and choose odd names (e.g. really wuxia names) that native parents would never pick for their kids.

* Not sure how to post links on FT, https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%BE...BB%8A%EF%BC%89 and the bottom section links to the equivalent for other countries.

Last edited by Agneisse; Oct 2, 22 at 3:30 pm
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Old Oct 3, 22, 6:25 am
  #88  
 
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Originally Posted by FlyingMoose View Post
While I never studied Chinese, I did this for a while and it was not appreciated by any of the locals. I don't really care if people adopt names, provided they add up if its meant to ease cultural interactions. I've meet a disproportional amount of Asian people that adopted the name "Tony" for some reason, which resonates surprisingly well. Its the over the top names that stand out, just like when you would call your Western kid any of those names.

One of my favorite Chinese colleagues is called Rudolph which gets him a ton of attention and compliments at the end of the (Western) year. He frequently stops using his Western name during that period.
Maybe they like the actor Tony Leung

The whole point of our Chinese names (at least in Hong Kong and Taiwan), it is often with 2 characters, and the characters mean something when they are used together (not exactly a phrase but it represents something and you won't know if you don't know the actual characters). So, if you don't know Chinese, what's the point? I really should have removed all my Chinese names in all registries as they do more harm than good in Scandinavia. Mr. asked if I wanted any Chinese names in their birth certificates and I said, "Hell no, I don't want them to go through what I have been through." They took Mr's middle and last names with first names that are pronounced the same in Scandinavian language and English.
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Old Nov 2, 22, 12:39 am
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Originally Posted by GUWonder View Post
It’s certainly not the Commonwealth of Virginia, of Pennsylvania, of Massachusetts, nor of Kentucky.



Well, here’s the Canadian government using the same words:



And on the site’s page where they say “British Commonwealth”, they even have a banner in honor of the memory to their late head of state:

https://www.international.gc.ca/worl....aspx?lang=eng
gosh, imagine a government getting something wrong - or someone misinterpreting the words on that page. It was the British Commonwealth in 1931, it certainly is not in 2022.
it’s the Commonwealth of Nations, and since the American states you mentioned aren’t nations of course they’re not involved. The “British” Commonwealth ceased to be a thing decades before most of us here were born.
her Madge wasn’t head of State to many Commonwealth nations.
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Old Nov 2, 22, 12:59 am
  #90  
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Originally Posted by BadgerBoi View Post
gosh, imagine a government getting something wrong - or someone misinterpreting the words on that page. It was the British Commonwealth in 1931, it certainly is not in 2022.
its the Commonwealth of Nations, and since the American states you mentioned arent nations of course theyre not involved. The British Commonwealth ceased to be a thing decades before most of us here were born.
her Madge wasnt head of State to many Commonwealth nations.
Define many.... She was head of state of 32 at the point of coronation, and 15 when she passed away. Looking at the average head of state, I would say that is quite a lot.
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