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SU1492 returns to SVO and catches fire 05/05/19

SU1492 returns to SVO and catches fire 05/05/19

Old May 5, 19, 3:25 pm
  #16  
 
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They say that the plane was struck by lightning and went to a kind of manual mode which is called direct-law. Pilot decided to return to Moscow and peformed a hard landing which resulted in fire. As a person who live in Russia and a client of Aeroflot I think that we must admit the lack of competence either in Sukhoi manufactere whos plane cant stand a lightning strike without becoming unruly, or the lack of competence of Aeroflot pilot who cant handle the plane that direct-law mode. And thats truly horrible and sad, we feel so much pain for passengers who became victims of this
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Old May 5, 19, 3:28 pm
  #17  
 
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Yes, the hand luggage thing is definitely something that needs to be addressed in the coming months and years. Although it is discussed a lot on FT, it needs to be infused into the general mentality of the flying public, a bit like smoking being a no no. One thing that has mentioned again and again here, from our standpoint, is to always have your wallet and passport/ID on you, and not shut up in the overhead (like I usually do).
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Old May 5, 19, 3:59 pm
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Seems the Superjet has had no end of problems, and despite a very cheap price tag the ongoing operational problems make it too costly for the airlines using the aircraft.

Only Interjet (Mexico) and CityJet (Ireland, but wet lease to other airlines) fly them in the west.

https://aviationanalyst.co.uk/2018/1...hoi-superjets/

Lightning strikes are very common and I seem to recall that on average each aircraft is hit once a year. That should not cause a crash.

Horrible for those affected.
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Old May 5, 19, 4:00 pm
  #19  
 
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Originally Posted by Concerto View Post
Yes, the hand luggage thing is definitely something that needs to be addressed in the coming months and years. Although it is discussed a lot on FT, it needs to be infused into the general mentality of the flying public, a bit like smoking being a no no. One thing that has mentioned again and again here, from our standpoint, is to always have your wallet and passport/ID on you, and not shut up in the overhead (like I usually do).
After reading a report by a FTer about an emergency evacuation of a UA 777 at CDG in 2008 (post 12) I started keeping my shoes on during takeoff (and landing) and my wallet, phone and passport on my body (usually cargo pants pocket).

Various media sites now report that only 37 people survived the Moscow crash land. I really hope that deaths can’t be tied to irresponsible passengers delaying the evacuation by opening overhead bins and/or taking their bags with them, but if that is indeed the case, something needs to be done about that.
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Old May 5, 19, 4:05 pm
  #20  
 
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Update on fatalities is now at 41. What a terrible loss for everyone involved.
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Old May 5, 19, 4:06 pm
  #21  
 
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Well, I keep my shoes on during takeoff and landing anyway. That's been the general advice here and elsewhere, and I follow it now. But one is not born knowing these things, you learn it as you go along, and here we are more plugged in than ordinary people who take flights. Seems to me that getting away from the back of the plane as fast as possible would have enhanced your chances of getting out of this one. But I would have been very hard put to shed my seatbelt during the landing phase and run for the front. Looks like they only had seconds once down. And yes, as those pilots (WX) told me, the Superjet-100 has been plagued with problems. The Bombardier planes too, apparently, but that is another story.
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Old May 5, 19, 4:14 pm
  #22  
 
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Originally Posted by notquiteaff View Post


After reading a report by a FTer about an emergency evacuation of a UA 777 at CDG in 2008 (post 12) I started keeping my shoes on during takeoff (and landing) and my wallet, phone and passport on my body (usually cargo pants pocket).

Various media sites now report that only 37 people survived the Moscow crash land. I really hope that deaths can’t be tied to irresponsible passengers delaying the evacuation by opening overhead bins and/or taking their bags with them, but if that is indeed the case, something needs to be done about that.
In future they should be prosecuted and jailed although there is very little regard for safety regulations in Russia. I have been on many flights to Moscow where Russians defy the rules and take/make calls on their cellphones during take off and landing.
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Old May 5, 19, 4:47 pm
  #23  
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That video upthread is clearly chilling.
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Old May 5, 19, 5:03 pm
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Here's one vantage point of the full evacuation - flight deck crew didn't leave until well after the last slide pax - and one actually climbs back up to go back into the plane

https://www.pprune.org/showthread.php?p=10463896
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Old May 5, 19, 6:07 pm
  #25  
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Lack of Response

Looking at the video. Absolute disgrace that no fire engine was there for so long. Some serious questions need asked
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Old May 5, 19, 6:19 pm
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Originally Posted by gav0106 View Post
Looking at the video. Absolute disgrace that no fire engine was there for so long. Some serious questions need asked
I see foam on the AC at 1:51 into the full-length video. US Code requires a response time of 3 minutes (Link: https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/14/139.319). What's your personal record?

Lots of armchair experts and heroes here.

My condolences to those lost and hopes that lessons can be learned from the investigation.
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Old May 5, 19, 7:05 pm
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Russian tabloid has some interviews with the flight attendant and passenger

https://www.kp.ru/daily/26974.3/4031162/

https://www.kp.ru/daily/26974.3/4031131/

"Flight attendant Maxim Moiseev until the last fought for the lives of passengers. Staying inside the aircraft, he also pushed the surviving people along an inflatable ramp. And, inhaling gas, lost consciousness."

Female flight attendant stationed at front door:

"When the plane stopped, evacuation began immediately. Fire was visible. Everybody screamed that we were burning. But there was no flame inside the plane. It was already later that the passengers told that the portholes were melting from the heat. I have not seen anyone ... I pushed the door with my foot and pushed the passengers. So that they do not stay on evacuation. Right everyone by the collar."

Pax in 10C

" I am grateful to God that it all happened that way. Thank you flight attendants, they saved me. The girls stood nearby. The room where there was gas and dark, the highest temperature, they helped people out to help them out, helped them down the ramp, ”says Dmitry Khlebnikov."

Based on this it was smoky and hot but flames weren't in the cabin while people were evacuating.

As for the lightning strike...

"- The lightning struck the plane, there was a strong clap, and in the course of the movement - on the left - a flash flashed.

- Problems with communication began, the light signaling went out.

- It was heard how the strongest hail knocked on the hull - it was decided to return to the airport.

- At this time, the plane has already poured smoke.

- Passengers even before landing, reached for the exit in order to be on the ground soon.

- Someone even managed to call relatives and call out: "We are falling.""
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Old May 5, 19, 7:22 pm
  #28  
 
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Originally Posted by arlflyer View Post
I see foam on the AC at 1:51 into the full-length video. US Code requires a response time of 3 minutes (Link: https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/14/139.319). What's your personal record?
“Within 3 minutes from the time of the alarm...”

So the question is, when was the alarm issued? I was once was aboard a UA 747 that made an emergency return and landing at SFO due to one of the engines having a problem. The ARFF (fire engines) were awaiting us on the side of the runway as we were landing and chased us for a little bit as far as I could see. Of course, it was otherwise a very uneventful landing for us passengers.

In this case, did the aircraft return without anyone expecting an emergency landing, I.e., did the three minutes start when the fireball was seen by someone in the tower? Should there have been firefighting resources close by? Or perhaps they were? I think we will learn more about this over time.

Disclaimer: armchair airport traffic controller, pilot, firefighter, ...

Last edited by notquiteaff; May 5, 19 at 7:29 pm
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Old May 5, 19, 7:45 pm
  #29  
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Originally Posted by arlflyer View Post
I see foam on the AC at 1:51 into the full-length video. US Code requires a response time of 3 minutes (Link: https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/14/139.319). What's your personal record?

Lots of armchair experts and heroes here.

My condolences to those lost and hopes that lessons can be learned from the investigation.

Yes armchair experts we are with friend who work in this field. The fact emergency was called, no engines near by etc etc. The investigation should bring answers but I don’t hold my breath.

Also this is Russia not US. Not everything is done by Us standard. Just because US has 3 minutes doesn’t mean rest of world does.
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Old May 5, 19, 8:01 pm
  #30  
 
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Originally Posted by notquiteaff View Post


“Within 3 minutes from the time of the alarm...”

So the question is, when was the alarm issued? I was once was aboard a UA 747 that made an emergency return and landing at SFO due to one of the engines having a problem. The ARFF (fire engines) were awaiting us on the side of the runway as we were landing and chased us for a little bit as far as I could see. Of course, it was otherwise a very uneventful landing for us passengers.

In this case, did the aircraft return without anyone expecting an emergency landing, I.e., did the three minutes start when the fireball was seen by someone in the tower? Should there have been firefighting resources close by? Or perhaps they were? I think we will learn more about this over time.

Disclaimer: armchair airport traffic controller, pilot, firefighter, ...
Originally Posted by gav0106 View Post



Yes armchair experts we are with friend who work in this field. The fact emergency was called, no engines near by etc etc. The investigation should bring answers but I don’t hold my breath.

Also this is Russia not US. Not everything is done by Us standard. Just because US has 3 minutes doesn’t mean rest of world does.
Supposedly the pilot squawked 7600 (no comms), then 7700 (emergency) so it's possible ARFF did not know it should roll until later in the sequence.
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