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Jetstar- 24 hour Mistake Policy - Help

Jetstar- 24 hour Mistake Policy - Help

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Old Mar 15, 19, 3:33 am
  #16  
 
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And it is NOT a blanket "24 hour free cancellation" rule. The airlines can CHOOSE to offer that...OR a 24 hour fare hold. You don't get both, or even your choice. They only have to offer one.
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Old Mar 15, 19, 6:15 am
  #17  
 
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Originally Posted by Dave Noble View Post
How would it be a marketing advantage if all airlines were obligated to provide such a feature. If everyone has it, then there is no marketing advantage
The marketing advantage would come from a lesson of negative publicity for a brand.

But even if it was voluntary
I think if an airline in AUS offered such a change facility they would be perceived as acting more fairly to consumers and hence their brand value would increase.

Over the next year or two we will see in AUS the big corporates taking the lead from the results of the Banking Royal Commission and positioning themselves to act more fairly and ethically than they have in the past. This will be financial and non financial industry players. They will want to be seen to be fair corporate citizens.

There was was a story in the Fin Review today about QF allowing a woman who is getting cancer treatment a pause in her FF account similar to their offering to new parents. It made sense and so they changed the rules.

here it is but it might be behind a paywall. https://www.afr.com/brand/chanticlee...0190315-p514ft
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Old Mar 15, 19, 1:38 pm
  #18  
 
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Originally Posted by Dave Noble View Post
The airline does have to comply with it where DOT has juristiction, but it has no control over flights between AU and NZ
Perhaps, but this particular rule relates to where the ticket is purchased, not where it is flown. According to the U.S. DOT, this rule applies to all airlines that market their flights to consumers in the U.S., so if you are an American using an airline's U.S.-facing Web site, the airline must allow holds or cancellations for tickets purchased a week in advance.
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Old Mar 15, 19, 2:00 pm
  #19  
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Originally Posted by mikew99 View Post
Perhaps, but this particular rule relates to where the ticket is purchased, not where it is flown. According to the U.S. DOT, this rule applies to all airlines that market their flights to consumers in the U.S., so if you are an American using an airline's U.S.-facing Web site, the airline must allow holds or cancellations for tickets purchased a week in advance.
If you were to complain to DOT about a AU-NZ journey it would say that it is outside its juristiction

people have tried using DOT regarding things such as fares from Europe to Central/South america that have tramsitted through the USA and these have been rejected since it has no juristiction on even these

The US has no control over anything AU-NZ
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Old Mar 15, 19, 2:31 pm
  #20  
 
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Originally Posted by Dave Noble View Post
If you were to complain to DOT about a AU-NZ journey it would say that it is outside its juristiction

people have tried using DOT regarding things such as fares from Europe to Central/South america that have tramsitted through the USA and these have been rejected since it has no juristiction on even these

The US has no control over anything AU-NZ
But the U.S. does have control over tickets sold in the U.S. It's the ticket purchase the U.S. DOT rule applies to; the journey itself is irrelevant.

So as not to derail this thread with a discussion that is likely off topic, I'll point to a prior discussion of the U.S. DOT 24-hour reservation requirement, which also contains links to the official U.S. DOT rule, so you may read it for yourself.
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Old Mar 15, 19, 2:43 pm
  #21  
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Originally Posted by mikew99 View Post
But the U.S. does have control over tickets sold in the U.S. It's the ticket purchase the U.S. DOT rule applies to; the journey itself is irrelevant.

So as not to derail this thread with a discussion that is likely off topic, I'll point to a prior discussion of the U.S. DOT 24-hour reservation requirement, which also contains links to the official U.S. DOT rule, so you may read it for yourself.
There is mothing in the OP that suggests that the sale was made in the USA
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Old Mar 15, 19, 2:59 pm
  #22  
 
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Originally Posted by Dave Noble View Post
There is mothing in the OP that suggests that the sale was made in the USA
Correct; as I mentioned in my first post in this thread, I merely wanted to clarify the common misunderstanding that the U.S. DOT rule applies only to flights to/from the U.S. (I think many people confuse this with the U.S. tarmac delay rule, which does depend on the route.) As I explain in the linked thread and supporting documents, I want to emphasize that the U.S. DOT rule applies to tickets sold by any airline to consumers in the U.S., regardless of route.
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Old Mar 15, 19, 6:45 pm
  #23  
 
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DOT rules are completely irrelevant to flights bought on Jetstar websites other than those involving HNL .....


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Old Mar 15, 19, 6:50 pm
  #24  
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Originally Posted by mikew99 View Post
Perhaps, but this particular rule relates to where the ticket is purchased, not where it is flown. According to the U.S. DOT, this rule applies to all airlines that market their flights to consumers in the U.S., so if you are an American using an airline's U.S.-facing Web site, the airline must allow holds or cancellations for tickets purchased a week in advance.
This is simply incorrect. One cannot pick out snippets without reading the entire provision.

If only because the DOT rule by its terms has a specific exclusion for flights operated by foreign (to the US) carriers and provides that the entire Part (of the Rule) applies only to "all flights to and from the U.S. of a foreign carrier if the carrier operates scheduled passenger service." 14 CFR 259.2 (Applicability).

This language is unsurprising as neither the US government nor its DOT has jurisdiction over flights between places outside the US.

That said, and to get back on topic, all three of the US legacy carriers: AA, UA, and DL, initially complained bitterly about the Rule. They now all have cancellation policies which exceed the minimum required by the Rule. That is largely because consumers value it and offering it is considered brand-enhancing and not costing particularly much.

That does not help OP.
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Old Mar 15, 19, 8:45 pm
  #25  
 
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Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
This is simply incorrect. One cannot pick out snippets without reading the entire provision.

If only because the DOT rule by its terms has a specific exclusion for flights operated by foreign (to the US) carriers and provides that the entire Part (of the Rule) applies only to "all flights to and from the U.S. of a foreign carrier if the carrier operates scheduled passenger service." 14 CFR 259.2 (Applicability).

This language is unsurprising as neither the US government nor its DOT has jurisdiction over flights between places outside the US.

That said, and to get back on topic, all three of the US legacy carriers: AA, UA, and DL, initially complained bitterly about the Rule. They now all have cancellation policies which exceed the minimum required by the Rule. That is largely because consumers value it and offering it is considered brand-enhancing and not costing particularly much.

That does not help OP.
The repeated discussion about "jurisdiction" of flights outside the U.S. is not relevant, because this issue pertains to the purchase of tickets (in the U.S., by consumers in the U.S.) from the airline, over which the DOT does assert jurisdiction.

I've read this U.S. DOT's rule many times over the past few years, and I come to the same conclusion each time: The rule applies based on the purchase of the ticket in the U.S. ("each U.S. and foreign air carrier that has a website marketed to U.S. consumers"). I've linked to the thread containing relevant documents above; if you could share additional links which say otherwise, the I will (happily) stand corrected.

I agree this is not relevant to the OP; I just wanted to correct the notion that somehow the U.S. DOT rule on purchases within the U.S. does not apply simply because the flight itself is not to/from the U.S.
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Old Mar 16, 19, 12:47 am
  #26  
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