PBI screener ensures we are safe from gun-toting pets

Old Jan 24, 05, 12:37 pm
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PBI screener ensures we are safe from gun-toting pets

While standing in line at PBI this weekend, I was treated to what I believe is about the wackiest screener act I have seen so far.

Two sets of passengers had their little doggies in Sherpa carry-ons...now I am certainly not disputing the Sherpa bags had to go through the X-ray, but after the little doggies were taken out of the bags and the owners walked through the metal detector holding them under-arm, and not setting off the alarm, the screener stopped them and insisted on wanding the dogs from head and toe and all around - like they actually believed the elderly people holding the dogs had somehow intentionally hidden a prohibited weapon on or inside the dog....or perhaps the dog itself had acquired a ceramic pistol with which it intended to hijack the plane to demand better tasting kibble for dogs everywhere.

The look on one of the dogs was priceless - complete disbelief... the same look I had along with a couple of my line neighbors. The screener was not mean or obnoxious about it, and in fact was quite friendly...but for pete's sake...wanding a small dog? I would hate to see how they would treat a "Persian Cat"
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Old Jan 24, 05, 1:48 pm
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Originally Posted by bocastephen
Two sets of passengers had their little doggies in Sherpa carry-ons...now I am certainly not disputing the Sherpa bags had to go through the X-ray, but after the little doggies were taken out of the bags and the owners walked through the metal detector holding them under-arm, and not setting off the alarm, the screener stopped them and insisted on wanding the dogs from head and toe and all around - like they actually believed the elderly people holding the dogs had somehow intentionally hidden a prohibited weapon on or inside the dog....or perhaps the dog itself had acquired a ceramic pistol with which it intended to hijack the plane to demand better tasting kibble for dogs everywhere.
This is what amazes me, pretty much across the board (i.e. not just TSA) - is people doing stuff as part of their "job" that seems to be so absurd or have no rational grounding in reality.

"We're taking this plane to Cuba. Kibble, Cuba! *bark* "
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Old Jan 24, 05, 2:05 pm
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It wasn't guns, it was the plans the little pooches might have been carrying that the screeners were worried about.

I've just started re-reading Papillon after many years and immediately got a good laugh when going through the glossary:

Plan: A metal cylinder for holding money which the convict carries in his lower intestine to safeguard it from frisking or theft.

The author writes: "They could make me take off all my clothes, spread my legs apart, make me cough or bend over double, for all the good it would do them. The plan was high up in the large intestine."

Of course, these days it would be plastic - but even if it were metal and the WTMD alarmed - the TSA would never find anything.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 2:51 pm
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Originally Posted by red456

Of course, these days it would be plastic - but even if it were metal and the WTMD alarmed - the TSA would never find anything.
And you wouldnt fly if you had an uresolved alarm.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 2:57 pm
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Originally Posted by eyecue
And you wouldnt fly if you had an uresolved alarm.

So then I'll make it plastic.

The point being that if someone wants to get something on a plane badly enough, it will get on, TSA or not.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 3:14 pm
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Originally Posted by red456
So then I'll make it plastic.

The point being that if someone wants to get something on a plane badly enough, it will get on, TSA or not.
those things that do alarm, do they check it or let it go? either way "if someone wants to get something on a plane badly enough, it will get on". instead of villifying the screeners for having to do their job to the letter, i would focus more on the management that leads them. we may disagree on how they checked the dogs, but is anyone really saying that the dog(s) shouldn't be checked?

although it seems pretty silly, i've seen some people walk through with two of those lapdogs with studded dog collars. the individual set off the alarm and wondered why she was being picked on. i don't know what happened to the rest of that... but same as the OP. the look on the dogs faces were priceless!
 
Old Jan 24, 05, 3:29 pm
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Just to confirm...neither the passenger or the dog set off the alarm...there was no 'official' cause to check either of them. The screener voluntarily took it upon himself to wand the dog (not the human) after it came through the metal detector. It had no collar or leash, as they were removed and send through with the Sherpa bag.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 3:34 pm
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Originally Posted by eyecue
And you wouldnt fly if you had an uresolved alarm.
And do you resolve alarms that people say are due to metal implants through the use of a "doctor's note"?

I am curious as to how many unresolved alarms have resulted in people not being allowed to fly.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 3:38 pm
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Then the screener was wasting other travelers' time and made him/herself and the TSA look foolish - again.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 3:39 pm
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Originally Posted by eyecue
And you wouldnt fly if you had an uresolved alarm.
Huh?

Scenario 1: person walks through WTMD and alarms. HHMD finds no metal. Patdown finds no metal. Alarm is "unresolved." Pax may or may not have metal object inserted into body cavity. Are you saying person doesn't fly until TSA finds some metal somewhere or debugs the WTMD?

Scenario 2: person walks through WTMD with keys in pocket and alarms. HHMD finds keys. Pax says "oops." Alarm is resolved, and pax that may or may not have metal object inserted into body cavity definately gets on airplane.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 3:45 pm
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Amazing

Just an amazing story. I can't add anything to this. Funny thing is...I am not surprised!
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Old Jan 24, 05, 3:45 pm
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Originally Posted by studentff
Huh?

Scenario 1: person walks through WTMD and alarms. HHMD finds no metal. Patdown finds no metal. Alarm is "unresolved." Pax may or may not have metal object inserted into body cavity. Are you saying person doesn't fly until TSA finds some metal somewhere or debugs the WTMD?

Scenario 2: person walks through WTMD with keys in pocket and alarms. HHMD finds keys. Pax says "oops." Alarm is resolved, and pax that may or may not have metal object inserted into body cavity definately gets on airplane.
Scenario 2 is the way to go - but you tell them you have a metal rod or pins or screws in your hip and you carry a fake note from a fake doc testifying to this "fact".
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Old Jan 24, 05, 3:55 pm
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What's to stop someone from using a fake doctor's note? One can print them up on a laser printer and handwrite the information in. What are they gonna do? Call up every doctor on the planet?

What happens if the doctor they're trying to call also happens to be that person's personal friend?

A PhD is a doctor. Even a D.O. is called a doctor.
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Old Jan 24, 05, 4:08 pm
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Originally Posted by bocastephen
Just to confirm...neither the passenger or the dog set off the alarm...there was no 'official' cause to check either of them. The screener voluntarily took it upon himself to wand the dog (not the human) after it came through the metal detector. It had no collar or leash, as they were removed and send through with the Sherpa bag.
if that was to my post, mine was in reply to the last two starting with eyecue's comment.
 
Old Jan 24, 05, 4:11 pm
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Originally Posted by ND Sol
And do you resolve alarms that people say are due to metal implants through the use of a "doctor's note"?

I am curious as to how many unresolved alarms have resulted in people not being allowed to fly.
instinctually a lot of people grab the metal detector or bump it for some reason.

from the sounds of it, the wanding and/or patdown would "resolve" the alarm.

unless it's more of a call for the TSA to really start doing cavity searches.

sidenote, does anyone think that's still origional or clever?
 

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