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Countries that ban entry by people who have a US criminal record

Countries that ban entry by people who have a US criminal record

Old Sep 9, 18, 2:49 pm
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Lightbulb Countries that ban entry by people who have a US criminal record

I know this is an old thread but I wanted to know has anyone noticed in any of the countries that are listed ban or don't allow people into them if the person has a criminal record in the US?

I know Panama has now banned entry to anyone with a criminal record and shares that info with the US. I also know Japan does the same thing and bans anyone with a criminal record. Mexico also in 2016 started sharing criminal databases with the US. I know Canada does as well as is quite strict. Australia and New Zealand do the same.I think recently the UK also started banning people in the US with criminal records as it shares that info with the US.

Any other countries? that are listed in the compiled list mentioned in this thread?

what about Argentina?
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Old Sep 9, 18, 3:30 pm
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Welcome to FlyerTalk @worldtravel86,

I moved your question into a new thread from the List of countries/airports who take fingerprints and other biometric data thread.

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Old Oct 30, 18, 1:37 pm
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Japan

I have a friend who just went to Japan. She figured she would be honest and checked the "Yes" box on the question about having been convicted of a crime. She was pulled aside at immigration and detained for two hours. She is a US person and does not speak a lot of Japanese. After trying to convey to a total of three successive immigration agents that the infraction was a minor one from over 20 years ago, and that she was just trying to be honest, the third agent said to her in broken English "I think if this happened over 20 years ago, maybe your memory is not so good" and implied that she was mis-remembering the incident and should change the answer on the form. Many "gomen nasai" later she asked if she could change her answer and they let her in.
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Old Oct 30, 18, 5:50 pm
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Chile does when it comes to drug, sex and other comparable serious crimes as I suppose all US Visa Waiver Program countries do.
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Old Oct 30, 18, 7:14 pm
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Originally Posted by Viajero Perpetuo View Post
Chile does when it comes to drug, sex and other comparable serious crimes as I suppose all US Visa Waiver Program countries do.
A lot of US citizens with such US criminal record history manage to get entry into the UK/Ireland and the Schengen countries that are US VWP countries.
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Old Nov 30, 18, 7:53 am
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I can say from recent personal experience that Japan does not rigorously check. NOT checking the yes box yields a very high probability of being admitted to Japan and a very small possibility of being denied. Checking the yes box yields a very high probability of being denied and a very small possibility of being admitted. If it's an issue you can let your moral compass guide you on how you answer that question based on those immutable realities.

As for Chile, and Mexico, they do not even ask the question unless you are applying for a visa or something.

Brazil and China do ask the question on the visa application but do not rigorously check for a tourist visa. I cannot speculate what would happen if you answered yes but answering no seems not to ordinarily be a problem.
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Old Nov 30, 18, 11:05 am
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If you are form the US, the Chile immigration officer knows more than they will let on due to the tight two-way information sharing because of VWP. If you have US criminal problems related to drugs or sex offenses, you are very likely to be detained and deported no questions need be asked and as an Ibero-American country, they know that a verbal or check mark answer cannot be relied on. Also, the recent huge influx of immigrants into Chile in the past decade as "tourists" has made Chile even more wary of letting in persons with a criminal past.
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