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US travelers, did your powerful passport helped you before in a developed country?

US travelers, did your powerful passport helped you before in a developed country?

Old Aug 4, 18, 11:36 am
  #1  
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US travelers, did your powerful passport helped you before in a developed country?

Dual citizen here, recently became a US citizens!! Traveling to my country of origin for a visit, and was wonder if got any trouble from government officers for no real reasons, would the embassy support me? Is the US passport respected in these countries in general? anyone with experience he could share where flashing his blue passport was enough to get him out of trouble?
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Old Aug 4, 18, 2:51 pm
  #2  
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Iím not exactly sure what youíre concerned about

Iím not exactly sure what youíre concerned about - are you planning to break the law when you go back to your home country? This is exactly a practical question but Iíll leave it for a bit to see if others have suggestions. I would imagine it depends on what your country of origin as well.
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Old Aug 4, 18, 4:29 pm
  #3  
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Originally Posted by squeakr View Post
are you planning to break the law when you go back to your home country?
Absolutely no! My "former" country officials and police officers are the ones who are famous of breaking the law! For example, they can deny you boarding your plane to go back to your country for any bogus reason! They can stop you while in a car and claim that you were driving drunk, even though you were not drunk and were not driving in the first place!! I still need to go back to see my old parents though..
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Old Aug 4, 18, 4:39 pm
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If it is the 'law' its doubtful.

My neighbors growing up were from Haiti. The boy my age was born in Haiti. Even though he had US Citizenship and a US Passport, he could not visit after age 16 as he would be immediately drafted. The embassy would have been of no help, as that was the law. Haiti still considered him a citizen.

So, be careful going back to your home country thinking the US passport can provide immunity. Many countries would still recognize you as a citizen of their country and subject to their laws (especially regarding compulsory military service).
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Old Aug 4, 18, 6:03 pm
  #5  
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Originally Posted by bitterproffit View Post
...So, be careful going back to your home country thinking the US passport can provide immunity. Many countries would still recognize you as a citizen of their country and subject to their laws (especially regarding compulsory military service).
Just because one country acknowledges dual citizenship does not mean the other also does.

Many countries require its citizens to arrive & depart using the passport of that country.

USA passports are not well respected by some countries/government officials. Is not the "passport of choice" if you do a lot of international travel.

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Old Aug 5, 18, 7:19 am
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In general for dual citizens, the second country is unable to intervene whilst you're in the first country. For example I have dual UK, Swiss nationality. The UK government will generally not get involved whilst I'm in Switzerland, as my Swiss nationality is what counts here. I do however occasionally enter Switzerland with my UK passport, but that's no problem as there largely free movement between the two countries (at least until Brexit).
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Old Aug 6, 18, 6:01 am
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Originally Posted by catandmouse View Post
In general for dual citizens, the second country is unable to intervene whilst you're in the first country. For example I have dual UK, Swiss nationality. The UK government will generally not get involved whilst I'm in Switzerland, as my Swiss nationality is what counts here. I do however occasionally enter Switzerland with my UK passport, but that's no problem as there largely free movement between the two countries (at least until Brexit).
If the OPís country of origin is the one being visited and is the country of which the OP is also a citizen, the US too will generally not provide consular help to the OP in the (non-US) country of citizenship if the OP gets in trouble there. But the devil is in the details, in terms of who receives help and the nature of the help.
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