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Am I allowed to bring an AGM battery on a flight for my CPAP machine?

Am I allowed to bring an AGM battery on a flight for my CPAP machine?

Old Jul 22, 18, 8:12 pm
  #1  
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Am I allowed to bring an AGM battery on a flight for my CPAP machine?

Hi, I use a deep cycle AGM battery that is 12 V and 35 AH (amp hours) to power my CPAP when there is no electricity available. I use this when camping. My CPAP is medically necessary and life saving, prescribed by my doctor.

This is what the AGM battery looks like. It is similar in size to a car or marine battery:

https://www.batteriesplus.com/produc...ls/SLADC12=35J




It is spill proof and contained in a battery box to prevent short circuiting.

Can I bring it with my, along with my CPAP machine, laptop bag, and purse as a carry on for a later camping trip? And also for use on the flight if I get sleepy? (Note: the CPAP unit must be on the same level as my head; it can't be on the floor).
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Old Jul 22, 18, 9:08 pm
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AFAIK Using it on the flight is airline dependent.

Using it on the flight is airline dependent. So in terms of using it on the flight I would check with the airline youíre flying. In terms of the battery, Iíve not seen anything that says itís OK to bring the battery outside of the case as an extra carry-on - iíve only seen that the machine itself is OK as an extra carry-on piece. But you might also check with the airline on that.
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Old Jul 22, 18, 10:16 pm
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FAA - Batteries Carried by Airline Passengers FAQ:

Q1. What kinds of batteries does the FAA allow in carry-on baggage (in the aircraft cabin)?

Nonspillable wet batteries (absorbed electrolyte), limited to 12 volts and 100 watt hours per battery. These batteries must be the absorbed electrolyte type (gel cells, AGM, etc.) that meet the requirements of 49 CFR 173.159a(d); i.e., no electrolyte will flow from a cracked battery case. Batteries must be in strong outer packagings or installed in equipment. Passengers are also limited to two (2) spare (uninstalled) batteries. Spare batteries terminals must be protected (non-conductive caps, tape, etc.) within the outer packaging. Batteries and outer packaging must be marked “nonspillable” or “nonspillable battery.” Note: This exception is for portable electronic devices, not for vehicle batteries. There are separate exceptions for powered wheelchairs
I'm no expert in matters of electricity, however, I suspect that you will have a problem with the 12 volts and 100 watt hours limit per battery. If my Google search calculations are accurate, that equals only 8.33 AH.

In addition, many airlines require prior notice for approval of battery operated electronic medical devices. At American Airlines, for example, it must be given at least 48 hours before the flight.
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Old Jul 22, 18, 10:20 pm
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Also this: https://www.tsa.gov/blog/2013/06/11/...ries-your-trip

Prohibited Batteries:

Car batteries, wet batteries, or spillable batteries are prohibited from both carry-on and checked baggage unless they are being used to power a scooter or wheelchair. If you need to pack a spare battery for a scooter or wheelchair, you must advise the aircraft operator so that the battery can be properly packaged for air travel.
Spare lithium batteries (both lithium metal and lithium ion/polymer) are prohibited in checked baggage.
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Old Jul 22, 18, 10:29 pm
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Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
FAA - Batteries Carried by Airline Passengers FAQ:

I'm no expert in matters of electricity, however, I suspect that you will have a problem with the 12 volts and 100 watt hours limit per battery. If my Google search calculations are accurate, that equals only 8.33 AH.

In addition, many airlines require prior notice for approval of battery operated electronic medical devices. At American Airlines, for example, it must be given at least 48 hours before the flight.

Hmmm...I didn't realize there was a limit of amp hours. That is unfortunate. Maybe I can appeal to TSA as this is medically necessary. Thanks also for the calling them in advance part.

Originally Posted by Finkface View Post
Also this: https://www.tsa.gov/blog/2013/06/11/...ries-your-trip

Prohibited Batteries:

Car batteries, wet batteries, or spillable batteries are prohibited from both carry-on and checked baggage unless they are being used to power a scooter or wheelchair. If you need to pack a spare battery for a scooter or wheelchair, you must advise the aircraft operator so that the battery can be properly packaged for air travel.
Spare lithium batteries (both lithium metal and lithium ion/polymer) are prohibited in checked baggage.
Well, I might have hope then, as this is not a car battery, but a leak-proof AGM battery. And it is also for a medical device. Thank you. I might call them or try to reason with them at the airport.
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Old Jul 22, 18, 10:36 pm
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Originally Posted by juliep View Post
Hmmm...I didn't realize there was a limit of amp hours. That is unfortunate. Maybe I can appeal to TSA as this is medically necessary. Thanks also for the calling them in advance part.



Well, I might have hope then, as this is not a car battery, but a leak-proof AGM battery. And it is also for a medical device. Thank you. I might call them or try to reason with them at the airport.
You still far exceed the 100 watt hours limit.

https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-...-wet-batteries
Non-Spillable Wet Batteries
Carry On Bags: Yes (Special Instructions)
Checked Bags: Yes
No more than two spare non-spillable wet batteries are allowed as long as each battery does not exceed 12 volts and 100 watt hours.


How do I determine the watt hours (Wh) rating of a battery?
A3. To determine watt hours (Wh), multiply the volts (V) by the ampere hours (Ah). Example: A 12-volt battery rated to 8 Amp hours is rated at 96 watt hours (12 x 8 = 96). For milliamp hours (mAh), divide by 1000 (to get to Ah) and then multiply by the volts.
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Old Jul 22, 18, 10:56 pm
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Originally Posted by juliep View Post
That is unfortunate. Maybe I can appeal to TSA as this is medically necessary.
It's an FAA regulation, not a TSA rule. Even if the TSA lets you bring it through the security checkpoint, the airline will not permit you to bring that battery on board the aircraft.

I strongly suggest that you ask your doctor to prescribe an alternative device that is powered by a battery which is allowed in carry-on luggage.
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Old Jul 26, 18, 12:47 am
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Originally Posted by Finkface View Post
You still far exceed the 100 watt hours limit.

https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-...-wet-batteries
Non-Spillable Wet Batteries
Carry On Bags: Yes (Special Instructions)
Checked Bags: Yes
No more than two spare non-spillable wet batteries are allowed as long as each battery does not exceed 12 volts and 100 watt hours.


How do I determine the watt hours (Wh) rating of a battery?
A3. To determine watt hours (Wh), multiply the volts (V) by the ampere hours (Ah). Example: A 12-volt battery rated to 8 Amp hours is rated at 96 watt hours (12 x 8 = 96). For milliamp hours (mAh), divide by 1000 (to get to Ah) and then multiply by the volts.
My apologies for replying so late.

Yep, after looking at that info, I have to agree. It's not even close. Ugh.Thank you for mentioning that.

Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
It's an FAA regulation, not a TSA rule. Even if the TSA lets you bring it through the security checkpoint, the airline will not permit you to bring that battery on board the aircraft.

I strongly suggest that you ask your doctor to prescribe an alternative device that is powered by a battery which is allowed in carry-on luggage.
Ok, I will. Thank you. They make smaller batteries, but they are more expensive. I will see if I can get one.
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Old Jul 26, 18, 2:22 pm
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Originally Posted by TWA884 View Post
It's an FAA regulation, not a TSA rule. Even if the TSA lets you bring it through the security checkpoint, the airline will not permit you to bring that battery on board the aircraft.

I strongly suggest that you ask your doctor to prescribe an alternative device that is powered by a battery which is allowed in carry-on luggage.
This is correct. It all comes down the airline and the FAA with those pesky watt hours.

Happens a lot in checked baggage for us. Let's take some Anker powerbanks as an example.

This one is fine because it doesn't exceed the limit.

This one on the other hand is a no go.

In which case, we notify the airline to come and take it out of the bag.

My suggestion echoes that of TWA's, have your doctor proscribe a battery powered one either temporarily or permanently.

At least you can use a CPAP, I've never been able to get used to it and I'm waiting on a dental device.
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Old Jul 29, 18, 9:01 pm
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Originally Posted by LoganTSO View Post
This is correct. It all comes down the airline and the FAA with those pesky watt hours.

Happens a lot in checked baggage for us. Let's take some Anker powerbanks as an example.

This one is fine because it doesn't exceed the limit.

This one on the other hand is a no go.

In which case, we notify the airline to come and take it out of the bag.

My suggestion echoes that of TWA's, have your doctor proscribe a battery powered one either temporarily or permanently.

At least you can use a CPAP, I've never been able to get used to it and I'm waiting on a dental device.
Thanks for showing me those links, as I am in the market for a smaller battery like that for charging cell phones et al.

I agree. Some people have neve been able to use a CPAP for various reasons (leaks, feeling suffocated, etc.). I hope the dental device works for you. That would be easier in many ways than a CPAP machine.
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