losing nationality while travelling

Old Apr 7, 18, 12:00 pm
  #1  
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losing nationality while travelling

ok i have a question
if a citizen of a country , travelled
and while he is in the destination. his government decided to revoke his nationality.. means he is no more a citizen of the country issued his passport.

does the country he lives in know that?
and well they prevent him from travelling to some third country?

i mean if im pakistani, travelled to turkey.
and while im in turkey, i lost my pakistani nationality.
can i travel by my pakistani passport from turkey to nepal
which gives pakistani visa on arrival.
??????
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Old Apr 7, 18, 12:08 pm
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What would the “hypothetical” reason be for losing your citizenship in the first place ?
I would assume your passport would no longer be valid and you would have issues departing the country you’re in (passport control departing said country.. boarding flight - wouldn’t you need to show your passport ? Entering new country with a bad passport ...)

Last edited by Mauibaby2008; Apr 7, 18 at 12:37 pm
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Old Apr 7, 18, 12:14 pm
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Originally Posted by Mauibaby2008 View Post
What would the “hypothetical” reason be for losing your nationality in the first place ?
I would assume your passport would no longer be valid and you would have issues departing the country you’re in (passport control departing said country.. boarding flight - wouldn’t you need to show your passport ? Entering new country with a bad passport ...)
ok are you sure of this or you just assume?
i mean do you answer based on knowledge?
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Old Apr 7, 18, 12:21 pm
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Originally Posted by travelociter View Post
ok are you sure of this or you just assume?
i mean do you answer based on knowledge?
I do not speak from knowledge or experience, and I don’t think you will find a user on Flyertalk that has ever been stripped of their citizenship. It sounds very extreme for that to happen.

Does Pakistan do this often ...? How does this happen? Has this happened to you? You will need to share a lot more details to get any good answers.

Is this person a refugee ? Somebody on the run from the law?

I am based in the USA and I don’t know what it is like to travel without a valid passport but I think it is safe to assume you won’t be able to travel without a valid one..

Last edited by Mauibaby2008; Apr 7, 18 at 12:40 pm
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Old Apr 7, 18, 12:23 pm
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this happened because of persons political opinion against government
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Old Apr 7, 18, 12:27 pm
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Originally Posted by travelociter View Post
this happened because of persons political opinion against government
Maybe apply for some type of refugee status, if the case is truly not criminal in nature... I would suggest consulting an immigration lawyer in Turkey before taking advice from anybody on Flyertalk tho ..

I would not try to travel to another country without a valid passport, I think it would just cause more trouble. But I really do not know, hopefully somebody with experience in that could chime in..

I am curious of how this person found out his citizenship was revoked, if they were traveling in Turkey at that time?

Last edited by Mauibaby2008; Apr 7, 18 at 12:39 pm
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Old Apr 7, 18, 2:44 pm
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You need qualified legal advice from someone familiar with the specifics of laws of each of the countries involved, e.g. at least Pakistan, Turkey, and Nepal, as well as the practices of the air carriers involved in your travel.

As this appears to be a real life situation and based on specific facts, relying on anonymous legal advice is less than useless. Moreover, based on the facts you have provided, no rational lawyer would provide advice.

Your bottom line question also has to take into account the distinct possibility that even if a given country might admit you or permit you to transit it, an air carrier might not transport you.
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Old Apr 7, 18, 4:19 pm
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Originally Posted by travelociter View Post
ok i have a question
if a citizen of a country , travelled
and while he is in the destination. his government decided to revoke his nationality.. means he is no more a citizen of the country issued his passport.

does the country he lives in know that?
and well they prevent him from travelling to some third country?

i mean if im pakistani, travelled to turkey.
and while im in turkey, i lost my pakistani nationality.
can i travel by my pakistani passport from turkey to nepal
which gives pakistani visa on arrival.
??????
There is often a delay between revoking citizenship, revoking a passport, and flagging a passport as invalid for use
in a way that is readily known by other countries than the country issuing the passport.

If this is about a Pakistani national losing Pakistani nationality without having surrendered their Pakistani passport and using it to fly from IST-KTM before the passport’s printed expiration date, it’s possible but not guaranteed. It really depends on how much the Pakistani government has an axe to grind and how quickly it grinds the axe — if it even grinds it between the citizenship revocation and the passport’s printed expiration date.

Originally Posted by Mauibaby2008 View Post


I do not speak from knowledge or experience, and I don’t think you will find a user on Flyertalk that has ever been stripped of their citizenship. It sounds very extreme for that to happen.

Does Pakistan do this often ...? How does this happen? Has this happened to you? You will need to share a lot more details to get any good answers.

Is this person a refugee ? Somebody on the run from the law?

I am based in the USA and I don’t know what it is like to travel without a valid passport but I think it is safe to assume you won’t be able to travel without a valid one..

Civil or criminal denaturalization by government? The former isn’t all as rare as the latter.

If the passport was validly issued to the person using it before its printed expiration date and we are talking about a Pakistani passport, some have indeed been able to travel with one that should have been considered not valid.

Last edited by TWA884; Apr 7, 18 at 6:52 pm Reason: Merge consecutive posts by the same member; please use the multi-quote function
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Old Apr 7, 18, 7:10 pm
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Most countries have rules (by international agreement) about revoking citizenship unless you have dual citizenship as it renders you stateless.

this happens occasionally now when individuals head off to fight with terror groups, and the country they left from doesn’t want them back for obvious reasons.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has established rules on how UN member countries manage stateless individuals (refugees or not). Given Pakistan is a UN member state it in theory has obligations, though hard to enforce perhaps. They have a website if you need support.

In a sense with respect to the passport in the original post, it is still a form of identity and my be used to identify one self, but would have no validity as a travel document to be be granted entry into any country.

Last edited by wackyflyer; Apr 7, 18 at 7:27 pm
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Old Apr 8, 18, 9:37 am
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Originally Posted by wackyflyer View Post
Most countries have rules (by international agreement) about revoking citizenship unless you have dual citizenship as it renders you stateless.

this happens occasionally now when individuals head off to fight with terror groups, and the country they left from doesn’t want them back for obvious reasons.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has established rules on how UN member countries manage stateless individuals (refugees or not). Given Pakistan is a UN member state it in theory has obligations, though hard to enforce perhaps. They have a website if you need support.

In a sense with respect to the passport in the original post, it is still a form of identity and my be used to identify one self, but would have no validity as a travel document to be be granted entry into any country.
This may well be inaccurate advice. For many purposes, an invalid passport is not considered valid ID by some. As with everything in this thread, the exact circumstances may matter a great deal.
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Old Apr 8, 18, 4:26 pm
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Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
This may well be inaccurate advice. For many purposes, an invalid passport is not considered valid ID by some. As with everything in this thread, the exact circumstances may matter a great deal.
The point I was making is that if you arrive at a port as a refugee with empty pockets and nothing to identify yourself the situation is a little more difficult that if you have a passport, that has been canceled as a political move, which I would assume makes an attempt to claim asylum somewhat easier.
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Old Apr 13, 18, 10:43 pm
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They could probably claim political asylum, and would also need to obtain papers as a stateless person. I wouldn’t be surprised if the passport is accepted for travel, depending on how up to date and technically integrated the immigration systems of the two countries are
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