Go Back  FlyerTalk Forums > Travel&Dining > Travel Safety/Security > Practical Travel Safety and Security Issues
Reload this Page >

Can One Board a Flight to the US with an Expired US Passport?

Can One Board a Flight to the US with an Expired US Passport?

Old Mar 12, 18, 2:34 pm
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 3,030
Can One Board a Flight to the US with an Expired US Passport?

i don't think I've ever seen this question answered - usually, it comes up, and morphs into a discussion of how to get an ESTA in the non-American passport to get aboard the flight. I'm not asking about ways to get back to the US if stuck abroad, and yes, we all know, as a US citizen once you make it to the US you will be admitted.

Also not asking about how this might be finessed at airports with US pre-clearance (e.g., Canada, Ireland.)

Again, the question - anyone know whether airlines will allow someone to board a US bound flight if the only passport held by the passenger at flight time is an expired US Passport?
BigFlyer is offline  
Old Mar 12, 18, 7:07 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 177
TIMATIC instructs the airline websites, check-in agents, and gate agents not to issue that person a ticket or check them in:

Summary

No, the documentation you hold is NOT sufficient for the journey you have specified.

Type: Critical

Passport

Passport required.

Document Validity:

Passports and other documents accepted for entry issued to nationals of USA must be valid on arrival.

Could that person somehow possibly find a sympathetic agent at the ticket counter for an emergency ticket with an expired US passport and a sob story about an imminent family death back home, and how the traveler had never believed there would be a need to renew the passport? Possibly.

But obviously they'd be much better off getting a same-day, emergency passport at the local US consulate or embassy.


Originally Posted by BigFlyer View Post
i don't think I've ever seen this question answered - usually, it comes up, and morphs into a discussion of how to get an ESTA in the non-American passport to get aboard the flight. I'm not asking about ways to get back to the US if stuck abroad, and yes, we all know, as a US citizen once you make it to the US you will be admitted.

Also not asking about how this might be finessed at airports with US pre-clearance (e.g., Canada, Ireland.)

Again, the question - anyone know whether airlines will allow someone to board a US bound flight if the only passport held by the passenger at flight time is an expired US Passport?
Newbie2FT is offline  
Old Mar 12, 18, 7:20 pm
  #3  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 3,030
Didn't think to check Timatic. And, indeed, I get the dreaded red x if I input the info with an expired US passport.

Interestingly, checking Timatic to enter the UK on 15 March with a UK passport that expired on 9 January 2018 - gets the green check mark for OK to board. As does checking same dates to enter Germany with an expired German passport. Or to enter Germany with an expired French passport with the same dates. But, can't enter Germany with an expired UK or Greek passport for the same dates.

Originally Posted by Newbie2FT View Post
TIMATIC instructs the airline websites, check-in agents, and gate agents not to issue that person a ticket or check them in:



Could that person somehow possibly find a sympathetic agent at the ticket counter for an emergency ticket with an expired US passport and a sob story about an imminent family death back home, and how the traveler had never believed there would be a need to renew the passport? Possibly.

But obviously they'd be much better off getting a same-day, emergency passport at the local US consulate or embassy.
BigFlyer is offline  
Old Mar 12, 18, 8:08 pm
  #4  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 3,030
How are you accessing Timatic? I am accessing through the KLM website (actually, it takes me to "Traveldoc" which I assume is a Timatic product of some sort even though it says it is powered by ICTS Europe Systems). However, this interface basically gives a "yes" or "no", without a statement of the rules such as you are seeing.

Originally Posted by Newbie2FT View Post
Hmmm, it looks like TIMATIC says .......
BigFlyer is offline  
Old Mar 12, 18, 8:19 pm
  #5  
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 177
Originally Posted by BigFlyer View Post
How are you accessing Timatic? I am accessing through the KLM website (actually, it takes me to "Traveldoc" which I assume is a Timatic product of some sort even though it says it is powered by ICTS Europe Systems). However, this interface basically gives a "yes" or "no", without a statement of the rules such as you are seeing.
Here is the link to TIMATIC, directly from its owner IATA, where I've retrieved the quotes I've posted:

https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/pas...quirements.htm
Newbie2FT is offline  
Old Mar 13, 18, 9:06 am
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: LAS
Programs: Hilton Diamond, IHG Spire Ambassador, Radisson Gold, Hyatt Discoverist
Posts: 2,906
Originally Posted by BigFlyer View Post
Didn't think to check Timatic. And, indeed, I get the dreaded red x if I input the info with an expired US passport.
If you put the info in with the expiration date a year later, it will be cleared, and then when you show it to the check in agent she's probably unlikely to scrutinize it that closely.

Probably.
jphripjah is offline  
Old Mar 13, 18, 9:22 am
  #7  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: DCA
Programs: UA US CO AA DL FL
Posts: 42,857
Originally Posted by jphripjah View Post
If you put the info in with the expiration date a year later, it will be cleared, and then when you show it to the check in agent she's probably unlikely to scrutinize it that closely.

Probably.
That is poor advice.

The expiration date will stand out when the carrier enters or compares APIS data. It should also cause DHS to kick back the flight manifest to the carrier if the carrier manually processes documents. But, depending on the carrier, it may well scan using the RFID and that too will kick back the expired date.

Some of this is on OP who has not supplied the route or carrier. But, more than likely that a city with non-stop air service to the US has a US consulate which can supply a passport-replacing document (single use temporary document which gets OP back to the US). As OP correctly notes, as a USN he can't be denied entry -- it may simply take some time, or not. The issue is boarding the flight to the US.

Thus, rather than dreaming up all manner of ways around this and surmising that staff won't check something as rudimentary as expiration date, just see the consulate and all will be well.
Often1 is online now  
Old Mar 13, 18, 1:45 pm
  #8  
Moderator: Travel Safety/Security, Travel Tools, California, Los Angeles
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: VNY | BUR | LAX
Programs: AAdvantage | MileagePlus
Posts: 11,770
Exclamation Moderator's Note: Stay on Topic

Folks,

Please keep in mind FlyerTalk Rule 5 when posting here:
Stay On Topic

FlyerTalk exists for the discussion of frequent flyer programs and the related travel experience. With the exception of the few areas specifically designated for the discussion of other topics, confine your comments as closely as possible to these topic areas and to the topic of the thread and forum in which you are posting.
The OP's question is whether a US citizen with an expired US passport will be permitted by the airline to board a US bound flight.

This has nothing to do with whether British or German subjects with expired passports will be allowed to board flights to their respective countries or with the various types of British passports.

In addition, the Practical Travel Safety and Security Issues forum, according to the forum's sticky post, is the place to ask questions and get information to help you travel safely and with minimal hassle. Before replying to this thread, ask yourself, "If I were traveling today, is this something I need to know?" If you wish to discuss other countries practices, please feel free to start new informational threads specifically dealing with those topics. Discussions of what should or should not be the practices belong in the Checkpoints and Borders Policy Debate forum.

Off topic posts have been deleted.

Thank you for understanding,

TWA884
Travel Safety/Security co-moderator

Last edited by TWA884; Mar 13, 18 at 1:52 pm
TWA884 is offline  
Old Mar 14, 18, 6:23 am
  #9  
Original Member
 
Join Date: May 1998
Location: New York, NY, USA
Programs: AA 2MM, Bonvoy LTT
Posts: 11,495
As with all airline policies, YMMV. The answer depends on airline and/or individual check-in agent/station manager. I've had agents from one airline not allow check-in/boarding to Singapore with a US passport under 6 months validity while another airline did.

If you want to play it safe, go to US embassy/consulate and get a emergency passport. It's issued in a couple of hours, cost the same as a 10-year passport, issued with 1 year validity which you can trade it by mail back in the US for the 10-year without additional fee.
seawolf is offline  
Old Mar 28, 18, 5:43 pm
  #10  
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 39
I know that at a land crossing, a citizen can get in without a passport or an expired one. Once they verify your info of course. LPRs can get in too if they have expired GC or don't have it on them, but they have to be in status and pay a 500+ dollar fine. An expired GC denotes just the expiration of the document, not the status. This was straight from the mouth of a CBP officer at San Ysidro.
lfcfan is offline  
Old Mar 28, 18, 5:46 pm
  #11  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 3,030
The issue is not getting in if you make it to US soil (or a preclearance officer.) The hurdle is the airline letting you board.
BigFlyer is offline  
Old Mar 28, 18, 6:21 pm
  #12  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: DCA
Programs: UA US CO AA DL FL
Posts: 42,857
Originally Posted by BigFlyer View Post
The issue is not getting in if you make it to US soil (or a preclearance officer.) The hurdle is the airline letting you board.
This.

A US national cannot be denied entry to the US by the US. So, if OP makes it to immigration on landing, he may get a bit of extra scrutiny, but once everything checks out, he will be fine.

But, I can't think of a carrier which would permit OP to board a flight to the US. That is all the more so if OP is boarding at an airport near a US consulate which can, of course, issue a temporary passport replacing document (emergency passport).

This is not to suggest that there is not some ray of hope somewhere that this might occur. But, only by a carrier employee willing to put his job on the line.
Often1 is online now  
Old Mar 28, 18, 6:56 pm
  #13  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 3,030
Not to be too pedantic - OK, I confess I love to be pedantic - but I assume you meant to refer to US citizens, not US Nationals. US Nationals are people born in American Samoa.

In fact, some of them just sued today to be considered citizens by virtue of being born in American Samoa: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-a...enship-n860721



Originally Posted by Often1 View Post
This.

A US national cannot be denied entry to the US by the US. So, if OP makes it to immigration on landing, he may get a bit of extra scrutiny, but once everything checks out, he will be fine.

But, I can't think of a carrier which would permit OP to board a flight to the US. That is all the more so if OP is boarding at an airport near a US consulate which can, of course, issue a temporary passport replacing document (emergency passport).

This is not to suggest that there is not some ray of hope somewhere that this might occur. But, only by a carrier employee willing to put his job on the line.
BigFlyer is offline  
Old Mar 28, 18, 7:16 pm
  #14  
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Watchlisted by the prejudiced, en route to purgatory
Programs: Just Say No to Fleecing and Blacklisting
Posts: 88,273
Originally Posted by BigFlyer View Post
Not to be too pedantic - OK, I confess I love to be pedantic - but I assume you meant to refer to US citizens, not US Nationals. US Nationals are people born in American Samoa.

In fact, some of them just sued today to be considered citizens by virtue of being born in American Samoa: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-a...enship-n860721
All US citizens are US nationals, but not all US nafionals are US citizens. US nationals include people who are US citizens and it also includes many American Samoans without US citizenship.

US nationals or US citizens is otherwise a largely interchangeable reference, but there are some legal distinctions that do relate to border control functions of sorts. But the point is that the big hurdle is in the foreign-located US national/citizen reaching the US, not in getting in if in possession of a legitimate US passport, expired or otherwise, on arrival to the US.
GUWonder is offline  
Old Mar 28, 18, 8:35 pm
  #15  
Moderator: Travel Safety/Security, Travel Tools, California, Los Angeles
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: VNY | BUR | LAX
Programs: AAdvantage | MileagePlus
Posts: 11,770
Exclamation Moderator's Note: Topic Drift

Folks,

Per the forum's sticky post, the Practical Travel Safety and Security Issues forum is the place to ask questions and get practical information to help you travel safely and with minimal hassle.

Before posting, please ask yourself, “If I were traveling today, is this something I need to know?”

Debating the distinctions between US citizen and US nationals belongs in the Checkpoints and Borders Policy Debate forum.

Thank you for understanding,

TWA884
Travel Safety/Security co-moderator
TWA884 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread