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Acceptable Identification for Domestic Travel [Consolidated Thread]

Acceptable Identification for Domestic Travel [Consolidated Thread]

Old Oct 26, 11, 2:16 pm
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Acceptable Identification for Domestic Travel [Consolidated Thread]

I have searched the past forums for information on acceptable ID, but as the rules seem to change constantly, I did not see recent info. My question is what is acceptable ID? I am a federal employee with the nice standard federal employee ID badge (with microchip) which by the way is the same standard ID that TSA people have. According to my fellow federal employees and based on past experience flying, this is acceptable government issued ID for the checkpoints. Today flying home to DC, I flew out of LEX. The TSA agent would not accept the ID badge because according to him, it has to have a birth date on it. TSA website makes no mention of birthdate on what is acceptable ID. It does not refer to federal employee ID badges as acceptable, but it does refer to DOD badge which is exactly the same. Anyone know any info on this?
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Old Oct 26, 11, 2:36 pm
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Welcome to Flyertalk.

The list of acceptable ID's is here - http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtrav...documents.shtm

Employee ID's is not on the list, except for airline or airport workers. While the badge may look the same, they are probably considering who is issuing it in their decision to accept a DOD badge and not yours.

I can get a document that looks exactly like my drivers license, but they won't accept it if they know it's not a real license.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 3:04 pm
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Airline employee IDs will not have a date of birth either, although they may have a date of hire for non-rev seniority purposes, and an expiration date which I imagine is also on the OP's federal employee badge.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 5:37 pm
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Originally Posted by lindagtg View Post
I have searched the past forums for information on acceptable ID, but as the rules seem to change constantly, I did not see recent info. My question is what is acceptable ID? I am a federal employee with the nice standard federal employee ID badge (with microchip) which by the way is the same standard ID that TSA people have. According to my fellow federal employees and based on past experience flying, this is acceptable government issued ID for the checkpoints. Today flying home to DC, I flew out of LEX. The TSA agent would not accept the ID badge because according to him, it has to have a birth date on it. TSA website makes no mention of birthdate on what is acceptable ID. It does not refer to federal employee ID badges as acceptable, but it does refer to DOD badge which is exactly the same. Anyone know any info on this?
The DOD ID card (commonly referred to as a "CAC Card") is on the allowed list. But the ID card that is issued to non-DOD federal employees and contractors (commonly referred to as a "PIV Card") is not on the list. Even though CAC and PIV cards do look very similar, and PIV cards are issued to all TSA employees, they are technically not allowed.

That being said, I would not be surprised to hear of stories where the PIV card was accepted. Simply because the TDC confused it for a CAC card.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 6:42 pm
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You may want to print the list of acceptable ID's and take it with you to the airport, as there are numerous reports here of standard ID's, labeled as acceptable and appearing on the TSA list, having not been recognized by TSA.

I personally had a TSO at SEA refuse to accept my US passport as acceptable ID. She insisted that I had to show "government issued ID" such as a drivers license; I requested a supervisor, who allowed me to pass through using my passport as ID, though she told me that I should bring my drivers license next time. Since then I have used my passport as ID without a problem, but you just never know.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 7:27 pm
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What you probably have is a PIV or the HSPD-12 credential. This should work everywhere as it is apparently magical and stuff.

At first glance, these state-of-the-art smart cards, with embedded computer chips and sophisticated security features, may not seem that different from previous government credentials. In reality, these credentials are a quantum leap forward in the overall effort by government and industry to significantly advance identity and access management. In addition to fundamental improvements in physical security or facility access, the inherit technological features of these cards can profoundly advance the federal government's ability to extend security, support real mobility, enhance collaboration and increase productivity. [Source]
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Old Oct 26, 11, 7:37 pm
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Originally Posted by ScatterX View Post
What you probably have is a PIV or the HSPD-12 credential. This should work everywhere as it is apparently magical and stuff.



The only problem is, the majority of the card's security is in the contact interface. But the TDC's (currently) don't have anyway to validate that data so they just have to look at the printed features of the card.

Also, it's worth mentioning that the author of that article has a sizable financial interest in PIV cards. A fact which is not clearly disclosed anywhere in the article.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 8:34 pm
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Cordelli, the TSA link you posted, is actually where I found the information about acceptable IDs, but thank you. Part of what I noticed is that it has a list of acceptable ID, but it doesn't actually say acceptable IDs are limited to that list. As to who is issuing the ID, my understanding is the reason they started to standardize the ID badge between different federal government agencies was not only so it would be easier to identify a real one, but also the process you have to go through to get one. They don't give you that permanent badge (although it does have an expiration date) until they finish their background check on you, which includes fingerprinting you and verifying certain thing for at least the past 5 years of your life. It is not as extensive as a security clearance, but it was certainly more difficult to get than my driver's license.

Janus, that info is good to know. Considering that I fly out of DCA, where both the airline employees and TSA agents accept the PIV, you would think DC area TSA would of all people know the difference between a CAC and PIV (since so many of us in the area have one of those), and thus if PIV is not really acceptable, would not let me and my coworkers use it.

However, I still don't know the answer as to whether or not the ID badge has to have your birth date on it, like the LEX TSA agent said. Janus, do you know if the CAC has the birthdate on it?
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Old Oct 26, 11, 8:35 pm
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Originally Posted by Janus View Post
..the TDC's (currently) don't have anyway to validate that data so they just have to look at the printed features of the card.
Which makes them pretty useless. The cards are fairly useless too.

Originally Posted by Janus View Post
Also, it's worth mentioning that the author of that article has a sizable financial interest in PIV cards. A fact which is not clearly disclosed anywhere in the article.
Who'da thunk it?

It's amazing that a card that could make even the most hardened terrorist's heart melt into a ginormous pool of humanitarianism, while simultaneously curing cancer and singing show tunes, can't even get you on an airplane.

I'm starting to think the whole idea was just to make some political insider rich.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 8:45 pm
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Originally Posted by lindagtg View Post
Cordelli, the TSA link you posted, is actually where I found the information about acceptable IDs, but thank you. Part of what I noticed is that it has a list of acceptable ID, but it doesn't actually say acceptable IDs are limited to that list. As to who is issuing the ID, my understanding is the reason they started to standardize the ID badge between different federal government agencies was not only so it would be easier to identify a real one, but also the process you have to go through to get one. They don't give you that permanent badge (although it does have an expiration date) until they finish their background check on you, which includes fingerprinting you and verifying certain thing for at least the past 5 years of your life. It is not as extensive as a security clearance, but it was certainly more difficult to get than my driver's license.

Janus, that info is good to know. Considering that I fly out of DCA, where both the airline employees and TSA agents accept the PIV, you would think DC area TSA would of all people know the difference between a CAC and PIV (since so many of us in the area have one of those), and thus if PIV is not really acceptable, would not let me and my coworkers use it.

However, I still don't know the answer as to whether or not the ID badge has to have your birth date on it, like the LEX TSA agent said. Janus, do you know if the CAC has the birthdate on it?
1) Any federal or state issued ID is supposed to work for TSA, including the CAC and PIV

2) ABQ accepts both the CAC and PIV. Other locations with a significant government or military presence do as well. Some locations are hit and miss, depending on the whims of the clerk.

3) The CAC does not have birth date printed on it, but has that info imbedded in the smart chip and the barcode. Very few people and places, including the TSA and airports, have the ability to read the info off the smart chip (or to even tell if it is real), thereby making it essentially useless for it's intended purpose.

4) I know of no requirement that your government issued ID must have your date of birth, or address, or anything else besides you name. The CAC/PIV has only your name.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 8:48 pm
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Originally Posted by lindagtg View Post

However, I still don't know the answer as to whether or not the ID badge has to have your birth date on it, like the LEX TSA agent said. Janus, do you know if the CAC has the birthdate on it?
From the TSA website

Q. Can I fly without ID?

A. Adult passengers, 18 and over, are required to show a valid U.S. Federal or State-issued photo ID that contains a name, date of birth, gender, expiration date and a tamper-resistant feature. A passenger that refuses to provide any ID and will not cooperate in the identity verification process will not be allowed to enter the screening checkpoint. If you lose your primary ID or it has expired, TSA may accept other forms of ID to help verify your identity.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 9:00 pm
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Originally Posted by cordelli View Post
From the TSA website.[/B]
This may sound like semantics to most, but posting this statement on the TSA webpage does not make it a requirement. Does the "birth date" part have a regulation or at least a properly promulgated rule behind it?
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Old Oct 26, 11, 9:36 pm
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Originally Posted by ScatterX View Post
This may sound like semantics to most, but posting this statement on the TSA webpage does not make it a requirement. Does the "birth date" part have a regulation or at least a properly promulgated rule behind it?
Let me be diplomatic and say ... opinions on that subject differ.
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Old Oct 26, 11, 10:27 pm
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Originally Posted by lindagtg View Post
Janus, that info is good to know. Considering that I fly out of DCA, where both the airline employees and TSA agents accept the PIV, you would think DC area TSA would of all people know the difference between a CAC and PIV (since so many of us in the area have one of those), and thus if PIV is not really acceptable, would not let me and my coworkers use it.
If you dig around the TS/S forums you'll see countless examples of TSA accepting and not accepting valid/invalid ID. This is just another example of that. Also, DCA TSA knows full well that their purse strings frequent their airport. Which makes me think they would be a little more lenient on certain things.

Originally Posted by lindagtg View Post
However, I still don't know the answer as to whether or not the ID badge has to have your birth date on it, like the LEX TSA agent said. Janus, do you know if the CAC has the birthdate on it?
DOB is on the back: http://www.cac.mil/CardInfoGeneva1.html

As for requiring DOB, I think everything on TSA's allowed list does include DOB (though not sure about TWIC, Airline/Airport ID, and Canadian ID). The PIV card standard (NIST's FIPS 201-1) does not require DOB.
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Old Oct 27, 11, 6:16 am
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Originally Posted by jkhuggins View Post
Let me be diplomatic and say ... opinions on that subject differ.
Agreed. And these opinions differ wildly. Some might say that it's a requirement just because TSA says it is. Since they can make up anything they want and refuse to let you into the secure area (or fine you, or threaten to have your arrested), they apparently already won that argument.

I'm old school and think the government should actually have a properly promulgated rule for requiring citizens to identify themselves while traveling freely throughout these United States. @:-) And I also think they should be transparent about it (I'm a skeptic/pessimist "from Missouri"). Silly me.

Originally Posted by Janus View Post
If you dig around the TS/S forums you'll see countless examples of TSA accepting and not accepting valid/invalid ID. This is just another example of that. Also, DCA TSA knows full well that their purse strings frequent their airport. Which makes me think they would be a little more lenient on certain things.
I agree completely. It's a self-serving 'local' implementation. The TSA would say they are creating randomness to keep the evil mongers confused.
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