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Security Consultants Claim New Terrorist Bombs May Mean No More In-Flight WiFi

Security Consultants Claim New Terrorist Bombs May Mean No More In-Flight WiFi

Old Nov 4, 10, 4:38 am
  #16  
 
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R----ight... because no one had ever figured out how to remote-trigger a bomb before wifi was invented.
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Old Nov 4, 10, 4:44 am
  #17  
 
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Interesting, Gogo uses "capcha" to prevent automatic login systems. It's always been a nuisance to me, but it would prevent the scenario that this article worries about. I suppose not eliminating the "capcha" would be an acceptable price.
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Old Nov 4, 10, 7:58 am
  #18  
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Well, yes and no. They could have mobile broadband on the device, and use remote access to get to it when still in the broadband coverage area.

Use that to log into the gogo service and you have your connection for the rest of the flight.

Or they could go to Walmart and buy a $3 timer and use that
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Old Nov 4, 10, 8:07 am
  #19  
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Originally Posted by RichardKenner View Post
Interesting, Gogo uses "capcha" to prevent automatic login systems. It's always been a nuisance to me, but it would prevent the scenario that this article worries about. I suppose not eliminating the "capcha" would be an acceptable price.
Ever notice how captcha is increasingly becoming unintelligible to humans? Activating my son's Droid took 20 captcha attempts last week. The reason why captcha is unintelligible to humans now is because software from crackers has become very good.

So in theory, a terrorist could put a bomb in the hold of the plane that contains a netbook with a 20 hour battery that comes out of standby at the appointed time, logs into Gogo, and if successful, detonates (perhaps after receiving a confirmation Instant Message from a ground controller).

Seems rather involved to me. A netbook with the cellular broadband modem (some netbooks come with these built in) is far less convoluted, and has the advantage of built in location detection that works independent of GPS. A terrorist can buy a couple thousand of these, write some software, and not have to worry if the plane's Wi-Fi is working. IME, a plane departing ORD heading east provides good location signal to Google Maps until the place gets too high over Michigan (sometimes my blackberry turns itself on during the flight, I notice it over the pond, and see that Google Maps' last location was Detroit).

The only answer is ban everything except for naked passengers who have had a cavity search and whole body cat scan. For good measure, sedate the passengers.

Last edited by mre5765; Nov 4, 10 at 8:15 am
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Old Nov 4, 10, 8:12 am
  #20  
 
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As some have pointed out already, a captcha should be sufficient to foil any attempt at automated login by a preconfigured device. Of course, that does not rule out the possibility of the provider being compromised externally, but that is substantially harder.
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Old Nov 5, 10, 12:58 am
  #21  
 
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Originally Posted by Pharaoh View Post
This is crazy. In the extreme case, even Wifi connectivity is not necessary for nefarious purposes. A laptop with Wifi capability is quite sufficient. Will they try to ban all uses of laptops (or anything similar) now?
This will never come to pass. The business passengers will get upset, and once the business passengers are pissed off the airlines get very jumpy. The TSA will get its arse kicked and it'll back down
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Old Nov 5, 10, 5:01 am
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Originally Posted by oldjonesy View Post
This will never come to pass. The business passengers will get upset, and once the business passengers are pissed off the airlines get very jumpy. The TSA will get its arse kicked and it'll back down
When will this happen? People keep saying "Business Passengers will get pissed, TSA will back down." Why aren't they pissed about the countless other things? How is this different than all the other crud TSA does?

If TSA wants it, TSA will have it. There is nothing we or anyone else can do about it. Remember the no IFE? No Blankets? Where do you, can you, draw the line? Wifi? pfft....
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Old Nov 5, 10, 8:43 am
  #23  
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Originally Posted by Pharaoh View Post
This is crazy. In the extreme case, even Wifi connectivity is not necessary for nefarious purposes. A laptop with Wifi capability is quite sufficient. Will they try to ban all uses of laptops (or anything similar) now?
I've been on flights in the 1990s where hand baggage was so heavily restricted -- for "security reasons" -- that even laptops, cell phones and reading material were banned from being taken into the passenger cabin on board those flights. And I remember how a few years back the DHS/TSA wrote up restrictions on cabin baggage that were even more asinine than what I experienced on those flights to hot spots in the 1990s -- the way the US federal government wrote up those restrictions, even having a lap-child infant on the lap was technically a violation (even as it was not a violation that resulted in any enforcement action).

Last edited by GUWonder; Nov 5, 10 at 8:49 am
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Old Nov 7, 10, 9:13 pm
  #24  
 
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What's next. Banning laptops from the cabin?
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Old Nov 7, 10, 9:18 pm
  #25  
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Originally Posted by smartfoxxy View Post
If stopping the wifi service in a plane will cause safety to my travel, why not? But for a 14hour to 18hour travel, gosh it is really crazy to sit there and do nothing.
You know that people used to read books. That was not doing nothing.
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Old Nov 16, 10, 11:29 am
  #26  
 
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Gogo Going Buh-Bye? TSA considering banning onboard Wi-Fi

Atlanta Journal Constitution article "Wi-Fi for air travelers worries terror experts":

http://www.ajc.com/news/nation-world...ir-743309.html
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Old Nov 16, 10, 11:33 am
  #27  
 
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OH SH>>...the horse ran away, QUICK - SLAM THE BARN DOOR...
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Old Nov 16, 10, 11:37 am
  #28  
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If there's significant enough dollars to be made, the internet service will continue.

I wonder if the AFA just doesn't want to deal with the potential of fliers having access to pr0n.
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Old Nov 16, 10, 11:41 am
  #29  
 
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So many things wrong with this article.

In-flight wifi should simply be regulated to contain measures to prevent automated sign-in/purchase, e.g. including captchas. This goes a long way towards preventing terrorist devices from connecting to the internet and "phoning home".

There is no need to completely remove wifi, just tweak it to close one of many theoretical holes.
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Old Nov 16, 10, 11:48 am
  #30  
 
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Originally Posted by bubb1 View Post
In-flight wifi should simply be regulated to contain measures to prevent automated sign-in/purchase, e.g. including captchas.
Gogo already does. And always did.
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