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Sample Anti-Body-Scanner Letters to Congress, Airlines

Sample Anti-Body-Scanner Letters to Congress, Airlines

Old Oct 27, 10, 10:39 am
  #1  
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Sample Anti-Body-Scanner Letters to Congress, Airlines

[EDIT, JANUARY 6, 2011 - I plan to periodically update this post and the sample letters within it to reflect new developments. Send me a PM or post here if you have thoughts. - DD]

Hey folks, this is coming up in multiple threads and it appears it's time to consolidate. We're getting some new FTers drawn by anti-WBI Google searches and Facebook, so I've included a lot of information so those just joining us can get a sense of what the FTer community's objections may be to the AITs (although there are a lot of different objections; I'm not claiming to speak for the community as a whole, just trying to get interested people started in writing letters.)

In addition, there's a fantastic anti-AIT brochure at www.dontscan.us. There are also more anti-AIT websites; FTer Sydneysider has compiled a list in the first post of the Organized Resistance thread.

Based on InkUnderNail's terrific letter in the Resistance thread, I crafted the letter I've attached below, which anyone trying to fight the AITs has my express permission to 'borrow' in whole or in part. (I'd recommend a few edits to your own letter, tho, just so Congress doesn't start seeing these as form letters and discarding them.)

Here's a link to see who your elected representatives are:

http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml

You can email them, although having spent some time working for government I can tell you that printed letters or phone calls are more effective. I personally printed and faxed my letters, since mail to Congress is subject to extreme delays for security reasons.

If you want to send a hard copy through the mail, but don't have time to scrounge up paper/stamps, etc., there's a service at Postful.com that will send a letter through the U.S. postal service for $1. It's fast and easy. Also, EZGram.com will actually look up your representatives for you, and auto-fill them into the body of a letter you can pay $1 to print and mail. All you have to do is enter your address and cut/paste your text.

(Not that I need to say this, probably, but please keep your letters smart and civil. These are elected representatives we're addressing. I understand a lot of us are really angry about the loss of our rights, but it's easier for those in power to write us off as unbalanced crazies and not take our requests seriously if we don't seem reasonable.)


(insert today's date)

(insert the name of the official and the address to which you are directing the letter)


Dear Sir or Madam,

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has implemented the installation of advanced imaging technology (AIT) scanners. These are the devices that have the ability to "look" through clothing and "see" if there are any prohibited items underneath. When the machines were introduced, we were told they would not be used for primary screening. However, they are now being installed on the front lines of airport security queues nationwide.

It's apparent through the continued silence of Congress that our elected representatives have no sustained objection to what is being done in the name of increased security. I urge you to reconsider this position for the reasons I'll outline below.

Firstly, it has yet to be proven that these machines are safe enough to use on huge segments of the American population, every day of the year. When interested people ask questions about AIT's there is a contention that the Department of Homeland Security has certified the scanners against potential risk. Unfortunately, it appears the committee that examined the scanners and has assured the public of their safety is comprised chiefly of these machines’ manufacturers (“Are Scanners Worth the Risk?,” New York Times, September 7, 2010.)

TSA holds a long list of groups that it says are involved with determining and ensuring the safety of the devices, including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); The U.S. Army Public Health Command; and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. However, those organizations say they have no responsibility for the safety of TSA's machines. Further, the Department of Homeland Security refuses to release exposure data to top non-TSA safety experts. (Seattle Times, "Scientists Can't Check TSA's Scanner-Safety Claims," December 21, 2010.)

The TSA says its machines emit radiation doses "smaller than a cell phone." However, to ensure the doses are as low as they say, TSA should ensure the devices are serviced and monitored. Experts agree that malfunction of the machines, like a slowdown or spike in the intensity of the scanning beam, could cause radiation illness in passengers. These machines are not being administered or run by radiologists or medical technicians, but by ordinary TSA screeners - it's my understanding there are no special educational requirements on the part of people hired to operate the scanners. Not even a college degree is needed.

According to the Seattle Times article, the FDA and many state radiation-safety offices license, inspect and monitor almost all medical radiation devices. But even identical X-ray machines used in nonmedical government venues (i.e. prisons) fall outside the FDA's responsibility.

The machines present a detailed image of the nude body to an off site observer. I am not a prude, but I have an objection to this process - especially for minor children and the disabled. The TSA asserts that the images are not detailed, but they will not release sample images for independent observers to assess. Some sources indicate the specificity of the images is actually much greater than claimed - one person quoted said they could be used to "count the beads of sweat on (a passenger's) back."

The public has been assured these machines do not save images of naked Americans accused of no crimes, but the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) found in a FOIA lawsuit that the machines are required to be able to save images when they are ordered by the TSA. ("US airport body scanners can store and export images", The Register [theregister.co.uk], January 12, 2010.) This is in direct contradiction to TSA's claims. Also, tens of thousands of images were saved in courthouses in Florida and Washington using similar scanning machines (“Feds Found Storing Checkpoint Body Scan Images,” CBSNews.com, August 4, 2010.) It would be relatively easy for government to link the images with identifying information - since ID must be provided to enter the checkpoint secured area - for database compilation purposes.

This virtual strip search should not be done just because law-abiding Americans want to get on a plane, unless there is cause to believe that they are concealing something. Courts have repeatedly upheld the legal standard of reasonable suspicion (Terry v. Ohio, 392 U.S. 1 (1968)); this standard is currently being violated by the TSA.

Allegedly, the individual has the right to ‘opt out’ of the AIT scanners; according to the TSA there are signs posted at each AIT station informing travelers of that right. However, the anecdotal evidence of thousands of passengers on websites like WeWontFly.com indicate that these signs are often not present, or are very small with nearly illegible type and are placed in a secure area that is difficult to exit.

There are other concerns with these scanning machines - entering an AIT requires a passenger to abandon his or her belongings on the X-ray conveyor belt. This has given rise to a spate of recent incidents regarding theft or accusations of theft by TSA screeners ("TSA officer sentenced in thefts from passengers," Philadephia Inquirer, December 16, 2010; "Investigation: TSA thefts at NYC airports", ABCNews.com, January 4, 2011.)

Also, concerns are beginning to rise that the installation of the scanners may have been motivated by large monetary contributions to and lobbying of our elected representatives on the part of these machines' manufacturers rather than what is in the public interest. ("Scanner firms rely on Washington insiders," The Washington Post, December 24, 2010.) Apparently AIT machine manufacturers, including L3 Communications and Rapiscan, have more than tripled their lobbying efforts - to the tune of tens of millions of dollars funneled to key lawmakers - in the last couple of years.

The list of problems with the machines continues. Recently a study was done that indicates the machines may not effectively detect powdered explosives ("An evaluation of airport x-ray backscatter units based on image characteristics," by Leon Kaufman and Joseph W. Carlson, Journal of Transportation Security, December 2010.) Also, there's the question of the taxpayer funds being spent both to install and staff the machines. ("Staffing May Add $2.4 Billion to Body Scanner Costs, GAO to Say," BusinessWeek.com, March 17, 2010.)

Finally, if there are problems found on the scanner image, or someone exercises their right to opt out of the AIT machine, the TSA will perform a ‘pat down’ at the checkpoint. Having been subject to one of these ‘pat downs,’ I can testify that these searches are more akin to friskings that accused criminals receive upon arrest. Enhanced procedures have been introduced that allow TSA officers routinely to touch the genitalia of passengers, including those of underage minors. Evidence is mounting that these friskings would be more accurately described as sexual assaults in any other context.

As a law-abiding American without so much as a speeding ticket to my name, I resent the repeated insistence by government that I should allow this intrusive infringement upon my rights and privacy - as well as that of my fellow Americans - simply to travel to another part of the country. Airlines and air transportation generally has been heavily subsidized by taxpayer dollars over the years. This gives the general public a hefty say in what goes on in these facilities.

It would appear that terrorism-related incidents occur in miniscule numbers compared to the millions of people whose rights have now been violated (in ways both large and small) by these TSA procedures. I’m personally not against a reasonable search for terrorist equipment or activity, but it’s my considered opinion that current processes are beyond what ought to be considered lawful by our elected representatives. This is especially true given the fact that foreign companies are allowed to ship cargo on U.S. passenger planes that hasn’t even been disassembled or X-rayed (“TSA will not meet air cargo screening deadline,” Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 17, 2010.) Why are these companies totally exempt from even basic security measures, while my family has to decide between two grossly invasive procedures every time we visit the airport?

I am concerned that this expansion of the administrative search has been done without any Congressional authority and has not been vetted through the courts. Every day thousands of travelers are subjected to these searches and if they resist or question the process, the TSA will threaten to not allow them to fly. This coercive measure usually succeeds as many travelers have a significant amount of time and resources invested in the need to travel.

Thank you for your time. The Constitution guarantees all Americans freedom from unreasonable search and seizure, and an invasive procedure which clearly violates the spirit of this cherished document should not be implemented lightly. I would appreciate it if you or your staff would look into what is going on with security at our airports. I agree that security is important, but our basic right to be secure in our person and effects should not be easily overridden by a Federal agency acting outside of its defined powers.

Sincerely,

(put your signature here)

Your Name
Your Address
Your City and State
Your Phone Number
Your voting district, if you choose to include that information
The following is a list of contact info for the major U.S. airlines - PM me if I've forgotten any. I'll also be glad to add info for major metro transit authorities or other relevant offices. I've included links to the airlines' online complaint forms (most of the airlines don't have general email addresses, although I'm posting each executive email address when I can find one that appears legitimate. Note: These addresses are publicly available on the Web, so I don't think I'm violating anyone's legal rights by re-posting them here.) I'm personally going to print and mail letters to these folks.

American Airlines, Inc.
Gerard J. Arpey, President and CEO
4333 Amon Carter Blvd
Fort Worth, TX 76155-2605
Phone: 817-963-1234
Fax: 817-967-2841
Online complaint form

Gerard J. Arpey
President and CEO
(817) 963-1234
[email protected]

Delta Airlines, Inc.
Daniel Carp, Chairman
Richard Anderson, CEO and Director
1030 Delta Blvd.
Atlanta, GA 30320
Phone: 404-715-2600
Fax: 404-715-5042
Online complaint form

Richard Anderson
CEO and Director
[email protected]

Frontier Airlines, Inc.
Bryan Bedford, Chairman, President & CEO
7001 Tower Road
Denver, CO 80249
Phone: 720-374-4200
Fax: 720-374-4375
Online complaint form

[email protected] (?)

Southwest Airlines Company
Gary Kelly, Chairman, President & CEO
2072 Love Field Dr.
Dallas, TX 75235
Phone: 214-792-4000
Fax: 214-792-5015

Here's another good letter to Southwest Airlines from Ink, and one from flapping arms - both of these are short enough to fit into Southwest's online comment page, which limits to 2500 char. (Go to 'email us')

Gary Kelly, Chairman, President & CEO
[email protected]

Jim Ruppel
Vice President, Customer Relations
(214) 792-4223
[email protected]

US Airways Group, Inc.
W. Douglas Parker, Chairman, President & CEO
111 W. Rio Salado Pkwy.
Tempe, AZ 85281
Phone: 480-693-0800
Online complaint form

W. Douglas Parker, Chairman, President & CEO
(480) 693-6775
[email protected]

United Continental Holdings
Glenn F. Tilton, Chairman
Jeffery Smisek, President, CEO and Director
77 W. Wacker Dr.
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: 312-997-8000
Email: [email protected] (include your contact info and your Mileage Plus number if you have one)

Glenn F. Tilton, Chairman
(877) 228-1327
[email protected]

Here's some verbiage to start off those who'd like to direct missives to them. Again, feel free to copy and use if you're trying to fight the AITs, although you might want to make some edits. You also should consider attaching whatever you've already sent to your elected reps. FTer flapping arms included his status as shareholder in his letter to WN, which is also GREAT information to use.

Another official you may consider, who's been talking in the press about all the anti-AIT mail he's been getting:

Geoff Freeman, Executive Vice President
U.S. Travel Association
1100 New York Avenue, NW
Suite 450
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 408-8422
fax: (202) 408-1255
[email protected]

(insert today's date)

(insert the name of the official and the address to which you are directing the letter)


Dear Sir,

Attached please find a copy of correspondence I recently shared with my elected representatives. Since the issue of airline security is one that directly affects the financial health and well being of airlines such as your own, I feel you ought to be informed there is a groundswelling movement directed at stopping the Federal Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) from gross abuses of the person and effects of those who choose to travel via aircraft.

Until such time as TSA’s processes are reviewed by Congress and the courts, I personally intend to dramatically reduce the frequency and distance (cost) of airline trips I purchase for leisure travel. I feel that the currently required invasion of my privacy necessitates this step. Along with this invasion, of course, has come a requirement to invest noticeably more time, money and mental suffering in the need to arrive several hours early for a flight, and in contemplation of what is now an increasingly likely chance I will be significantly delayed or caused to miss my scheduled departure.

It is my understanding the TSA now shoulders costs and legal responsibilities formerly borne by the airlines in screening passengers, thus the hesitance by airline executives in helping to address these issues. Apparently major airline CEOs, including yours, support the TSA and its current practices. I urge your leadership team to reconsider your support. I feel the bottom line of America’s air travel companies may at some point be affected by the hesitance of customers to purchase airline travel, given the increased costs via government intervention in what should be the private affairs of common people.

Very truly yours,

(put your signature here)

Your Name
Your Address
Your City and State
Your Phone Number
Your Frequent Flier Number (for whatever airline you are sending this to)
Go get 'em, folks! This is still the USA and we still have rights to our opinions as citizens. Remember the old saying by Pastor Martin Niemoller..we don't want to speak up after it's too late and we're being asked to step through an AIT before we're permitted to [fill in the blank - the possibilities are endless.]

Last edited by divemistressofthedark; Jan 6, 11 at 8:46 pm
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Old Oct 27, 10, 10:47 am
  #2  
 
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The first one is pretty long. The folks these will be going to have the attention span of a gnat.
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Old Oct 27, 10, 10:51 am
  #3  
 
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While the content is very good, it should be 1/3 to 1/2 the length it is at present. These people get hundreds of letters a day, make it short, concise, and to the point. Such a long letter is likely to get a form letter response about how the TSA is doing everything possible to protect us and our liberties
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Old Oct 27, 10, 10:53 am
  #4  
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Originally Posted by Global_Hi_Flyer
The first one is pretty long. The folks these will be going to have the attention span of a gnat.
And how many times do people complain here about form letters they get in return? Don't you think that after awhile that aides (the folks that really read the letters) will just start to dismiss boilerplate letters?

Would be best to have some guidelines (short, concise, unemotional letters) done by some bullet points listed in this forum.
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Old Oct 27, 10, 10:59 am
  #5  
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My intent here is to provide a lot of information so folks can pick and choose. While I personally sent the longer version, people are free to adapt whatever points resonate with them in drafting their own letters.

We're starting to see new members who aren't familiar with the finer points of anti-WBI sentiment and who may or may not know precisely why they are so bad or what exactly our objections to them are. If someone wants to bullet point a list of priorities he or she thinks is important, by all means, please do so. Also, please post a copy of your own letter - someone may read it and think of some salient point I left out of the OP. FWIW, I did say in the OP that I think people should edit their letters so these don't appear to be form letters.

And, I'll edit the first post to include the fact that there's a fantastic brochure for download at www.dontscan.us, that provides a great overview of what we're about.

Last edited by divemistressofthedark; Oct 27, 10 at 11:14 am
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Old Oct 27, 10, 11:07 am
  #6  
 
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Originally Posted by LessO2
And how many times do people complain here about form letters they get in return? Don't you think that after awhile that aides (the folks that really read the letters) will just start to dismiss boilerplate letters?

Would be best to have some guidelines (short, concise, unemotional letters) done by some bullet points listed in this forum.
Unfortunately, whats contained in those letters are necessary to be stated. Unless we give the congresscritter or his lackey all the information we can, it won't help our cause.

Tho, TBH, I'm starting to lose faith. There's too many kettles, and not enough of us.
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Old Oct 27, 10, 11:15 am
  #7  
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You do know there are now 14,000 people in the Facebook group right, MM?

(There's a lot of linkage to FT going on over there, which is partly why I'm writing this)
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Old Oct 27, 10, 11:22 am
  #8  
 
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Originally Posted by divemistressofthedark
You do know there are now 14,000 people in the Facebook group right, MM?

(There's a lot of linkage to FT going on over there, which is partly why I'm writing this)
Of course, I am a member there too.

We all talk a good game, then the media trots out 6 kettles and I know nothing will change.

<--in a pessimistic mood today.
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Old Oct 27, 10, 4:07 pm
  #9  
 
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Here is a copy of my letter to AA

Hi folks,
Please feel free to offer any constructive comments. It has not yet been sent. Thanks...

Dear Sir or Madam:

I joined the American Airlines AAdvantage program in August 1993 as a high school student when I was preparing to take my first AAdvantage trip to visit my prospective university. Since that time, I attended that university, graduated with honors, earned degrees and experience, entered the workforce, and started my own business which is now prospering. Now, at the age of 34, I have been an Executive Platinum passenger for over 5 years in a row. I am a resident of the Dallas-Fort Worth area, proud to call American Airlines my airline, and proud to call the United States of America my home. I am living the American dream.

However, the extent of my loyalty and pride will only go so far. I am outraged and appalled at the practices that are occurring at airports around the country by low-level security agents under the auspices and direction of the TSA. The screening techniques that are being used on law-abiding citizens on an everyday basis and at whim are unacceptable and must be stopped. The use of whole-body imaging and enhanced pat-downs are egregious violations of the rights of American citizens guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution.

I am writing to inform you that I have made the decision to reduce my business travel and personal travel in 2011 to the lowest levels possible that will still allow me to earn income and honor family commitments until this hysterical madness comes to an end. I have officially notified my clients of this decision and I have proudly explained to them the reason for my decisions. I have the support of my business partner who has also made the same pledge. As well, my clients have all responded positively and are in support of my decision.

Although the TSA may shoulder the burden of the direct costs of security, the persistence of the American people must not be underestimated. Ultimately, the tide will turn and the ramifications of these rights violations will impact the airlines financially. I ask that you consider this letter carefully and do your part to stand up for the rights of the free and honest Americans who are being violated by the TSA and its current practices. Thank you for your attention and concern.

Sincerely,
TXagogo
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Old Oct 27, 10, 5:02 pm
  #10  
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My suggestion:

Dear Sir or Madam:

I joined the American Airlines AAdvantage program in August 1993 as a high school student when I was preparing to take my first AAdvantage trip to visit my prospective university. Since that time, I attended that university, graduated with honors, earned degrees and experience, entered the workforce, and started my own business which is now prospering. Now, at the age of 34, I have been an Executive Platinum passenger for over 5 years in a row. I am a resident of the Dallas-Fort Worth area, proud to call American Airlines my airline, and proud to call the United States of America my home. I am living the American dream.

However, the extent of my loyalty and pride will only go so far. I am outraged and appalled at the practices that are occurring at airports around the country by low-level security agents under the auspices and direction of the TSA. The screening techniques that are being used on law-abiding citizens on an everyday basis and at whim are unacceptable and must be stopped. The use of whole-body imaging and enhanced pat-downs are egregious violations of the rights of American citizens guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution.

(I would put something a little more human to the last part of that last paragraph, saying something to the effect that it's a shame that having dignity is something else that is not allowed past the checkpoint, and that you do not intend to continue flying at the cost of it).

I am writing to inform you that I have made the decision to reduce my business travel and personal travel in 2011 to the lowest levels possible that will still allow me to earn income and honor family commitments until this hysterical madness comes to an end. I have officially notified my clients of this decision and I have proudly explained to them the reason for my decisions. I have the support of my business partner who has also made the same pledge. As well, my clients have all responded positively and are in support of my decision.


I would shorten that to: My family and my clients support my decision to reduce my travel in the year 2011, quite possibly to the level where attaining any status with American, or any other airline, is unlikely.


Although the TSA may shoulder the burden of the direct costs of security, the persistence of the American people must not be underestimated. Ultimately, the tide will turn and the ramifications of these rights violations will impact the airlines financially. I ask that you consider this letter carefully and do your part to stand up for the rights of the free and honest Americans who are being violated by the TSA and its current practices. Thank you for your attention and concern.

I would say: It is ironic that I fly an airline named American, as I feel that what we are subject to at the airport by the TSA is anything but American. When exactly will leisure travelers and, more importantly, business travelers will just say "enough?" I have reached that tipping point, and by my discussions with other American Airlines customers, I am likely not the only person who feels this way.

I look forward to your response.


If you do anything to the letter, I would definitely take out the "low level security" thing.

Just my two cents.
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Old Oct 27, 10, 5:35 pm
  #11  
 
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Thanks LessO2. I am leaving in the first paragraph as originally written to give the letter a personal feel to it. I want it to stand out from the typical "here is my gripe" letter. I appreciate the suggestions!
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Old Oct 27, 10, 6:24 pm
  #12  
 
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You want short,

Here is short:

Dear Congressperson:

I recently had the experience of traveling by air to (insert trip description). Of course, this required that I go through the security lanes at the airport manned by the TSA.

They tried to get me to go through the the new scanner, but I asked not to as I have heard that some of these emit radiation and I really think that it is a significant infringement of my rights have to allow someone to look at my naked body just so I can get on an airplane to (trip description).

So instead of getting scanned I was surprised to get frisked just like a common criminal. Is this proper? Is this part of a new law? I never had to do this before.

I am embarrassed and more than a bit angry at this. This does seem right to me. I do not like having a stranger rub their hands all over me and I do not need to be scanned with more radiation.

Not only that, this scanner line was a lot slower. A whole lot slower. What with the pocket emptying and the pat downs, it is much slower.

Please look into this. I believe that the TSA may be going to far.

Thanks

(your name)
And another

Dear (Congressperson):

Thank you for your time.

I travel a lot and it is necessary for my work. I am really upset about the installation of the new scanners that are a virtual strip search that the TSA uses at my airport.

They are slow. They are inconvenient. I do not want to be hit with any more radiation than necessary to get a medical diagnosis. And, if I ask to opt out, I am patted down like a police suspect. Is this really legal? It is very uncomfortable.

Please take an opportunity to look into what is happening to people that just want to get on an airplane.

(Your name)
And one more

Dear (congressperson):

I would like to take a vacation, but I have heard that they have new scanners at the airport that will look at my (age) little baby (boy/girl) naked before they will let us get on the plane. A friend says that they can opt out but will get rubbed all over by some stranger. That is just wrong!

Surely this is incorrect information. If this is happening, it can not be something that congress approved. The old metal detector and occasional search were fine, but this is just too much. Is this even legal?

Thank you for your time.

(your name)
I could do this all day long....

Let's try one for the CEOs

Dear (name of airline executive)

My name is (your name). I am a very frequent flier on your airline, (loyalty account number), have flown (number of miles) in the last (number) of years. I love flying on (name of airline) and I always enjoy the experience. I have spent many happy hours flying to and from (place) on (name of airline).

That is until now. The total experience is greatly ruined by the travesty that is the screening process at the airport. It is so bad, that I have begun to look at alternatives to flying.

I wish I could put a stop to the naked image scanners and the retaliatory pat downs for opting out. I do not need the extra radiation and the extra time these machines take make it even harder to travel.

I can not stop them, but you may have more influence. These new procedures are costing you passengers. Not to other airlines, but to other modes of transportation. These are customers that may be very difficult to win back. And I have talked to many associates, and it is more than just me.

Thanks for your great airline, and I hope I can stay.

(your name)
And for what it is worth, this is the response to my long letter to WN:

Dear INK,

Thank you for taking the time to contact us. We appreciate the opportunity to address your concerns regarding the Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

It's important to explain that the implementation of imaging technology is solely determined by the TSA and not by the airline. The TSA has a responsibility to ensure the security of the traveling public. However, they also recognize that there is a delicate balance between privacy and security; therefore, imaging technology is optional for all passengers. Please visit the TSA’s web site for more information (including locations where imaging technology is currently being used) regarding this screening method.

Again, we appreciate your taking the time to share your thoughts. Should your future plans require air travel, we hope we will merit your consideration.

Sincerely,

(Persons' Name), Southwest Airlines

Last edited by InkUnderNails; Oct 27, 10 at 7:57 pm
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Old Oct 27, 10, 8:02 pm
  #13  
 
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Another letter to Disney from a happy camper found on
http://www.disboards.com/showthread.php?p=38740333
My family and I returned from our first Disney vacation last month (09/06 through 09/13). We stayed at the Caribbean Beach Resort at Walt Disney World and everyone had a wonderful time. Our entire time at Disney was magical. It had been over 20 years since I had been to Disney as a child when my parents took my sisters and me. Experiencing Disney through the eyes of a father and seeing the smiles on my children (ages 5 and 2) was priceless. Thank you for being able to provide such a magical experience. The last night of our stay, we received a pamphlet with a discount (free dinning plan) to return in 2011 and experience a new vacation. My wife and I eagerly talked about doing another vacation in 2011 that night and the week after we returned from vacation.

However, we now have a growing concern that we am not sure how to address. We live in NW Indiana and must fly from Chicago to Orlando in order to visit Disney. A new set of rules by The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has my wife and I concern. TSA has announced the expansion of their whole body imaging (WBI) program to major airports by next year. This means that either we must choose to

1) expose our family to a dose of ionized radiation by the WBI machine so that it can create a nude image of each of our family members which can be stored and/or released to the internet if the operator so chooses,

2) if we opt-out of the WBI machine then our family will be groped/frisked by a TSA agents to included our private parts in order to ascertain the same level of details that the WBI does or

3) choose not to fly which means we cannot visit Disney and instead find something closer (drive able) to spend our next vacation at.

My wife and I have a strong concern over option 1 on our children and exposing them at such an early age to radiation from a machine that has not undergone long term testing for possible side effects. In addition, the ability of the machine to store nude images of our children for the operator or anyone online to see if very unsettling. Option 2 is no better and again our children will be subjugated to being felt up in places where they have been told is a no-no for a stranger to touch them. As such right now my wife and I are having a very hard time deciding how to get to Disney to re-experience the magic. It is not an issue of not being able to afford another Disney vacation for us. It is an issue of not wanting to have our children experience the unpleasant nature of air travel under the current/future TSA rules.

Right now, my wife and I are happy that we were able to experience at least one family Disney vacation. This is bitter sweet, however, if we cannot experience more in the future due to the air travel experience that TSA is creating.
A pox on the TSA
Wimpie is offline  
Old Oct 27, 10, 8:48 pm
  #14  
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Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nashville, TN - BNA
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I dunno, I'm a fan of this phrase:

I am outraged and appalled at the practices
^

I could do this all day long....

Let's try one for the CEOs
*cackling*

keep 'em comin', folks!!
divemistressofthedark is offline  
Old Oct 27, 10, 11:43 pm
  #15  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 733
Fantastic thread!

Originally Posted by divemistressofthedark
I dunno, I'm a fan of this phrase:

I am outraged and appalled at the practices
My personal favorite in this genre is "I am shocked, appalled, and disgusted". Anyone feel free to use it...
barbell is offline  

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