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NY Times: Beware of start-ups selling travel on private jets

NY Times: Beware of start-ups selling travel on private jets

Old Jun 17, 16, 9:01 am
  #1  
nsx
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Join Date: Sep 1999
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NY Times: Beware of start-ups selling travel on private jets

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/14/bu...s-make-it.html

New companies pop up frequently, many with apps that allow travelers to book seats in minutes. But not all of them will survive.

BlackJet was founded in 2012 and aimed to apply the Uber model to private jets. It was backed by a founder of Uber, Garrett Camp, and celebrities like Ashton Kutcher. But about a year after it began, it laid off staff and suspended service.
I've found over the years that when any company promises you a great deal on services to be delivered far in the future in exchange for a one-time payment up front, you are unlikely to receive those services. Companies making such offers tend to be in serious financial trouble.

I bought a lifetime Ionosphere Club membership from Eastern Airlines in what turned out to be its last months. The membership was for their lifetime, not mine. After some initial resistance, Continental stepped up and honored Eastern memberships, making me a lifetime Presidents Club member. The merger with United made me a United Club lifetime member. This is the one case I can recall where up front payment actually delivered a great deal.

When you see an offer with a large up-front payment you've got to ask yourself one question: "Do I feel lucky?"
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Old Jun 17, 16, 1:59 pm
  #2  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
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Originally Posted by nsx View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/14/bu...s-make-it.html



I've found over the years that when any company promises you a great deal on services to be delivered far in the future in exchange for a one-time payment up front, you are unlikely to receive those services. Companies making such offers tend to be in serious financial trouble.

I bought a lifetime Ionosphere Club membership from Eastern Airlines in what turned out to be its last months. The membership was for their lifetime, not mine. After some initial resistance, Continental stepped up and honored Eastern memberships, making me a lifetime Presidents Club member. The merger with United made me a United Club lifetime member. This is the one case I can recall where up front payment actually delivered a great deal.

When you see an offer with a large up-front payment you've got to ask yourself one question: "Do I feel lucky?"
nice post and interesting new sub forum. hope to see vivid participation. on the topic at hand, up front is for suckers
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